UNMC fills 25-bed covid unit, doctor warns of delta variant

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Top metro doctors said they are seeing a familiar and unwanted trend as hospitalizations for COVID-19 begin to skyrocket. Health officials at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have said most of their COVID patients are not vaccinated. pulled to stop a potential push. One of the doctors from Nebraska Medicine said that in the past month things have changed. Now they are admitting more and more younger patients as the delta variant spreads. “Unfortunately, you know, the, the tendency to see these cases increase is incredibly daunting,” said UNMC Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases Dr. Angela Hewlett. As the delta variant crosses the subway, it sends more and more more people in hospital. Angela Hewlett of Nebraska Medicine said at the end of June that they had three patients with COVID. At present, the COVID unit at Nebraska Medicine is full, holding 25 patients. They are working to open a second unit so that she can take more patients. While she doesn’t expect things to go as badly as they did last fall, things aren’t looking good either. “That being said, our vaccination rate is still not high enough to protect us from an outbreak and that could potentially cause a lot of hospitalizations and also potentially death, “Hewlett said. Vaccines are key here. Hewlett said. that most patients right now are not vaccinated and, from what they’re hearing from these people, it has a lot to do with misinformation on social media. machine, they all wish they could go back and get vaccinated, ”Hewlett said. She said that even if you’ve had COVID-19 before, that doesn’t mean you’re fully protected. “The natural immunity persists for a period of time, probably several months, but it tends to wane over time, and you can still be sensitive,” Hewlett said. Even if you don’t get extremely sick from COVID, Dr Hewlett wants people to know that even mild symptoms can lead to long-term problems you don’t want. It is therefore preferable to be vaccinated. “It’s not just whether you live or die. It’s also about those complications that can really disrupt things in your life that you really want to do. There are people who are going to, you know, have a disability, you know for months and months, ”Hewlett said.

Top metro doctors said they are seeing a familiar and unwanted trend as hospitalizations for COVID-19 begin to skyrocket.

Health officials at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have said most of their COVID patients are not vaccinated.

Now they’re begging you to get your shot to stop a potential flare-up.

One of the doctors from Nebraska Medicine said that over the past month things have changed.

Now they are admitting more and more younger patients as the delta variant spreads.

“Unfortunately, you know, the trend for these cases to increase is incredibly daunting,” said Angela Hewlett, associate professor of infectious diseases at UNMC.

As the Delta variant crosses the metro, it sends more and more people to the hospital.

Dr Angela Hewlett of Nebraska Medicine said in late June that they had three patients with COVID.

Right now, Nebraska Medicine’s COVID unit is full, accommodating 25 patients.

They are working on opening a second unit to be able to take more patients.

While she doesn’t expect things to go as badly as they did last fall, things aren’t looking good either.

“That being said, our vaccination rate is still not high enough to protect us from an outbreak and it could potentially cause many hospitalizations and also potentially death,” Hewlett said.

Vaccines are the key here.

Dr Hewlett said most patients right now are not vaccinated and, from what they are hearing from these people, it has a lot to do with misinformation on social media.

“One of our intensive care doctors who said if all of these people could have a time machine, they would all wish they could go back and get the shot,” Hewlett said.

She said that even if you’ve had COVID-19 before, that doesn’t mean you’re fully protected.

“Natural immunity persists for a while, probably several months, but then it tends to wane over time, and you can still be sensitive,” Hewlett said.

Even if you don’t get extremely sick from COVID, Dr Hewlett wants people to know that even mild symptoms can lead to long-term problems you don’t want.

It is therefore preferable to be vaccinated.

“It’s not just whether you live or die. It’s also about those complications that can really disrupt things in your life that you really want to do. There are people who are going to, you know, have a disability, you know for months and months, ”Hewlett said.


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