Professor – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:01:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Professor – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 The 14 Hottest Pokemon Teachers, Ranked https://jasonpowers.org/the-14-hottest-pokemon-teachers-ranked/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:01:55 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/the-14-hottest-pokemon-teachers-ranked/ The internet is collectively craving the two newest Pokemon teachers introduced in Pokemon Scarlet and Purple, the latest game in the franchise. Each generation of Pokémon gives us new monsters to collect, worlds to explore, and a new Pokémon teacher to help guide new trainers. Most games come with a teacher, but in Scarlet and […]]]>

The internet is collectively craving the two newest Pokemon teachers introduced in Pokemon Scarlet and Purple, the latest game in the franchise. Each generation of Pokémon gives us new monsters to collect, worlds to explore, and a new Pokémon teacher to help guide new trainers. Most games come with a teacher, but in Scarlet and Purplethe copy you choose determines the teacher you will encounter on your new Pokémon journey.

When new teachers, Sada and Turo, were introduced, fans couldn’t help but but notice that both were ridiculously beautiful. The Pokemon The franchise has certainly had hot teachers before, but something about the teachers in the Paldea region in particular has players all hot and bothered.

In honor of the release of Scarlet and Purple, we took the opportunity to rank the most popular Pokémon teachers for your viewing pleasure. While this ranking may not be exhaustive, it sure is sexy.

14. Laventon

Image via The Pokemon Company/Game Freak

Professor Laventon made his first appearance in Pokemon Legends: Arceus and while we appreciate his style, he’s not exactly what we would consider hot. Laventon is more of a wacky uncle than someone to date. We wouldn’t mind if he offered us one of those cool pom pom hats.

13. Elm

Image via The Pokémon Company

Professor Elm has its moments, but Professor Johto Pokémon was not designed with attractiveness in mind. Elm is one of the more low-key teachers, barely making an appearance in the main plot of his respective games, and not much is known about him other than being a little giddy than the other teachers. . This clumsy professor has a special place in our hearts for giving us our first Cyndaquil but we can’t rank him higher because we just don’t know him enough.

12. Oak

Image via The Pokémon Company

Professor Oak is the quintessential Pokemon teacher and while not unattractive, he gives off some grandpa vibes that keep him down the leaderboard. Oak is definitely one of the most helpful teachers because he introduced us to the world of Pokémon and we will always respect him for that. Although we personally don’t find it hot, there is definitely someone who does.

11. Magnolia

Image via The Pokémon Company

Professor Magnolia is a professor in the Galar region and although she doesn’t do much in her respective game, she looks cool. She is an elegant woman and we would like to take a tour of her jewelry collection. With her dignified attitude and kind eyes, we know Magnolia is a trap. Magnolia gets bonus points for her love of the corgi-inspired Pokemon, Yamper.

10. Rowan

Image via The Pokémon Company

Professor Rowan has a gruff, more serious demeanor than other Pokémon professors and his introduction into Pokemon Diamond and pearl is considered by many fans to be a turning point in the series. Rowan is the first professor to have such a commitment to personal style that he refuses to wear the usual lab coat and some believe his sharper character design ushered in an era of better looking Pokémon professors. We have a thing for a man with authority and Rowan has it in spades.

9. Juniper

Image via The Pokémon Company

Notable for being the first female Pokémon professor, Professor Juniper was introduced in Pokemon Black and White. Juniper has one of the friendliest personalities in games, as she’s smart, fun, and confident. Along with her intelligence and kindness, fans have also noted that Juniper has a very motherly look to her – which could be a plus or a minus depending on what you like. While we’re not personally interested in it, there are certainly people who are, given the overwhelming amount of Juniper fanart on the internet.

8. Willow

Image via The Pokémon Company / Niantic

Although he may be a Pokémon researcher only in the Pokemon Go games, Professor Willow has gathered many fans of her rugged beauty. With gear straight from a sporting goods store, Willow is one of the most outdoor-loving teachers out there. After an in-game kidnapping plot (yes, really), Willow came back with a new look that some fans loved and others were. less impressed with.

7. Birch

Image via The Pokémon Company

He may not be a stereotypical idol, but Professor Birch is a healthy type of attraction. Professor Hoenn wears cargo shorts, flip flops, and a satchel, so you know he’s serious in the fashion department. Kidding aside, Birch looks like the type of guy who would be nice to everyone he meets and you know he’d be happy just sitting on the couch with your favorite movie or video game. Birch is the guy you would take home to your parents, and that certainly counts for something.

6. Sycamore

Image via The Pokémon Company

When Professor Sycamore was first announced in Pokemon X and Yes, the Internet immediately dubbed him the hottest Pokémon teacher. The admiration for the Professor’s obvious good looks has faded a bit in recent years, but he is undeniably still a handsome man. Sycamore’s look seems loosely inspired by late 2000s indie bands and you can definitely see the appeal of going to a local gig with Professor Kalos.

5. Burnet

Image via The Pokémon Company

She may not be the main teacher in her games, but Professor Burnet earns that title thanks to her extensive research into Ultra Wormholes. First appearing in the Alola region, Burnet is an outgoing and loyal person and is married to the (also sexy) Professor Kukui. We respect her eternal thirst for her husband and we also enjoy Burnet on her own as a badass Pokemon finder.

4. Tower

Image via The Pokemon Company/Game Freak

We all knew Professor Turo would be high on this list. The man is clearly proud of his looks and why wouldn’t he be, with such a strong canvas to begin with? His haircut and lab coat look really expensive, and while he can walk around in what’s essentially a futuristic jumpsuit, that’s only a problem if you let him. We would like to attend a lecture given by this professor.

3. Sada

Image via The Pokemon Company/Game Freak

Professor Sada is the prehistoric half of the futuristic Professor Turo and is just as sexy. We love Sada’s saber-toothed accessories, perfectly styled hair, and steely gaze that shows she’s serious. just like her Purple counterpart, Sada is almost too attractive. It’s no wonder fans have collectively lost their minds over these two handsome teachers.

2. Sonia

Image via The Pokémon Company

Sonia begins as an assistant to her grandmother, Professor Magnolia, but becomes a full-fledged Pokémon teacher by the end of Pokémon Sword and Shield. Sonia is an avid Pokémon researcher who is determined to succeed, and we can only admire that quality. She’s also arguably the cutest teacher on this list with her heart clips in her hair and infected smile. We can’t decide if we want to be her or date her.

1. Kukui

Image via The Pokémon Company

The first place in our ranking goes to Professor Kukui from Alola. This Pokémon teacher has it all: a sweet, laid-back personality, combat savvy, and abs of steel. The only professor on this list to also be a champion for his region, Kukui knows his stuff when it comes to Pokémon. He gets along well with children, he is athletic and he is basically a superhero — how not to faint?

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As a professor at UC, I support the strikers. Our schools shouldn’t have let it come to this https://jasonpowers.org/as-a-professor-at-uc-i-support-the-strikers-our-schools-shouldnt-have-let-it-come-to-this/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:46:05 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/as-a-professor-at-uc-i-support-the-strikers-our-schools-shouldnt-have-let-it-come-to-this/ UCLA scholars join tens of thousands of their peers across the University of California system on strike Wednesday. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times) Nearly 48,000 employees at the University of California’s 10 campuses went on strike this week. These union members — including postdoctoral fellows, university researchers, and graduate students employed as instructors, teaching assistants, and […]]]>

UCLA scholars join tens of thousands of their peers across the University of California system on strike Wednesday. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times)

Nearly 48,000 employees at the University of California’s 10 campuses went on strike this week. These union members — including postdoctoral fellows, university researchers, and graduate students employed as instructors, teaching assistants, and tutors, among other roles — demand higher salaries, childcare benefits, better working conditions and access to affordable housing.

It’s no mystery why 98% of United Auto Workers members who voted on the strike supported it. The Average UC System Graduate Student Earns $24,000 annually — nearly $15 000 less than the average apartment in Santa Cruz costs a year. This is obviously an impossible salary to live on.

As a former teaching assistant and current professor, I know better than anyone the value of positions for these workers in a university system. In my experience, most college professors are assigned one teaching assistant, some more than one, depending on the size of the class and the position of the professor. With some variations, most teaching assistants are responsible for all interactions with students outside of class. In other words, if a student has a question, they meet in person or email the TA, not the professor.

But the real workload is filing. Professors typically have their teaching assistants do it all, which means reading hundreds of pages of student work a week, commenting on said work, and then entering grades according to the categorization method used by the professor in question. This is an overwhelming amount of work, all on top of the already strenuous responsibilities of grad school.

I felt lucky when I was “awarded” to a TA position in graduate school – my program used the term “awarded” as if it was not a paid job but a a prize awarded only to a select few who had achieved such a prodigious position. I’ve worked with one of the best writers of the past two decades, and I haven’t been saddled with the heavy responsibility of grading student assignments. But my experience is a rare exception to the standard TA pattern that feels more like indentured servitude than reasonable post-college employment.

An assistant on my campus said to me, “I have to strike…we can’t do anything else. They will not negotiate with us. They don’t even want to talk to us… We need more money. I can’t even pay the rent. I have a scholarship and still have to take out student loans just to get by. But we can’t do that anymore. I heard that sentiment — “we can’t take it anymore” — repeated by everyone I spoke to about the strike.

The workers demand a base salary of $54,000, more than double their current average salary. UC officials offered some workers a 7% raise in the first year and 3% each year thereafter. While officials say they can’t meet financially all the demands of the workers, the investment advantages of the UC system was $152.3 billion at the end of the 2021-22 academic year, according to the UC president’s office. Some UC administrators receive half a million dollars wages. It’s not so much a question of whether the system needs more money, but of distributing it fairly.

UC is not content to just let down its student employees. It is to drop the whole system, including the provosts, the professors and the most important element: the student body.

I support the strike because I support my students. I am still figuring out what this means right now for me as a teacher. I have two basic choices to continue the courses: continue to teach them in person or switch to online teaching. The former means crossing a physical picket line, while the latter looks like an empty gesture of solidarity that doesn’t help disrupt the system to support the strike.

For now, I give my lessons in person. I believe this is the only way to honor my primary responsibility to provide my students with the best possible education. But I’m also worried that if it means I downplay the effectiveness of the strike, I’m not helping my students in the long run. Ultimately, the better these employees are taken care of, the better they will fulfill their vital role in the education of our undergraduate students, which should be the priority of any public institution of higher learning.

When interviewing one of my classes, I discovered that all but one of the 26 students supported the strike (and only half were content to move classes online, which makes sense; this generation of undergraduates had already seen his secondary education drastically interrupted by the COVID pandemic).

Students and staff deserve more from their university system. As negotiations continue, UC has put its faculty in the difficult position of compromising on education and working around the university’s shortcomings.

But that’s nothing new for the seasoned educator. After all, part of our job has always been to bridge the gap between societal fairness and bureaucratic greed.

Joseph Holsworth teaches literary theory and criticism at UC Santa Cruz and is a veteran of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

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A California professor pursues the second Jeopardy! tournament title https://jasonpowers.org/a-california-professor-pursues-the-second-jeopardy-tournament-title/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 18:42:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/a-california-professor-pursues-the-second-jeopardy-tournament-title/ Sam Buttrey returns to “Jeopardy!” stage on Monday when the final of the Tournament of Champions begins. (Previous coverage in the video above.) Buttrey, an associate professor of operations research at the Naval Postgraduate School, earned his spot in the finals after winning the semifinals on Thursday, November 10. It was Final Jeopardy. The clue: […]]]>

Sam Buttrey returns to “Jeopardy!” stage on Monday when the final of the Tournament of Champions begins. (Previous coverage in the video above.) Buttrey, an associate professor of operations research at the Naval Postgraduate School, earned his spot in the finals after winning the semifinals on Thursday, November 10. It was Final Jeopardy. The clue: “By ferry, the distance between these 2 twinned Mediterranean islands is about 40 miles from Alcudia to Ciutadella”, Buttrey correctly answered, “what are Mallorca and Menorca?” His bet of $10,601 was enough to advance him to the final. Professor NPS is now in the running for a second “Jeopardy!” title after winning the first teachers’ tournament last December. But winning this second title will not be easy. Buttrey takes on Andrew He and Super Champion Amy Schneider. A champion will not be crowned overnight. The finals will follow a best-of-seven format. The first competitor with three wins wins the tournament title and a grand prize of $250,000. Although we don’t yet know who will win. One thing is clear. The winner will be from California as all three contestants are from the Golden State. He’s from San Francisco and Schneider is from Oakland. “Danger!” airs weeknights at 7 p.m. on KSBW 8.

Sam Buttrey returns to “Jeopardy!” stage on Monday when the final of the Tournament of Champions begins.

(Previous coverage in the video above.)

Buttrey, an associate professor of operations research at the Naval Postgraduate School, earned his place in the finals after winning the semifinals on Thursday, November 10.

It boiled down to Final Jeopardy. The clue: “By ferry, the distance between these 2 twinned Mediterranean islands is about 40 miles from Alcudia to Ciutadella”, Buttrey correctly answered, “what are Mallorca and Menorca?” His bet of $10,601 was enough to advance him to the final.

Professor NPS is now in the running for a second “Jeopardy!” title after winning the first teachers’ tournament last December. But winning this second title will not be easy. Buttrey takes on Andrew He and Super Champion Amy Schneider.

A champion will not be crowned overnight. The finals will follow a best-of-seven format. The first competitor with three wins wins the tournament title and a grand prize of $250,000.

Although we don’t yet know who will win. One thing is clear. The winner will be from California as all three contestants are from the Golden State. He’s from San Francisco and Schneider is from Oakland.

“Danger!” airs weeknights at 7 p.m. on KSBW 8.

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Epidemiology professor Marc Lipsitch talks about Covid-19 surveillance strategies | New https://jasonpowers.org/epidemiology-professor-marc-lipsitch-talks-about-covid-19-surveillance-strategies-new/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 06:52:23 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/epidemiology-professor-marc-lipsitch-talks-about-covid-19-surveillance-strategies-new/ Harvard epidemiology professor Marc Lipsitch discussed lessons from the Covid-19 pandemic regarding disease surveillance strategies at a Harvard School of Public Health seminar on Wednesday. Lipsitch, who has led the Center for Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since last year, reflected on the strategies different countries are using […]]]>

Harvard epidemiology professor Marc Lipsitch discussed lessons from the Covid-19 pandemic regarding disease surveillance strategies at a Harvard School of Public Health seminar on Wednesday.

Lipsitch, who has led the Center for Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since last year, reflected on the strategies different countries are using to track the spread of Covid-19.

Lipsitch said most countries, with the exception of Luxembourg and the UK, relied on case notification as the “basic unit of surveillance” during the pandemic.

However, he noted that the number of reported cases is an “unreliable measure of disease activity” because people may not be prompted to take a Covid test or report a positive result.

“It’s a very strange type of quantity to report, because it’s not an epidemiological quantity such as incidence, prevalence, or duration,” he said. “But it’s a complex function of those quantities.”

Lipsitch instead hailed the surveillance strategies used in Luxembourg and the UK

He said Luxembourg randomly takes a “substantial fraction” of its “small population” each week to measure the spread of the virus. This strategy has enabled Luxembourg to monitor the effectiveness of its countermeasures against Covid-19.

The UK used two surveillance methods at the start of the pandemic, according to Lipsitch. One was repeated at different times during the pandemic, while the other tracked households over time.

Lipsitch said the methods used in Luxembourg and the UK are based on the belief that the “best way” to track infection in a country is to measure the spread in a random sample.

Lipsitch also stressed the importance of data completeness. For example, Lipsitch said the United States lacks data examining the race and ethnicity of people infected with SARS-CoV-2.

Still, there are ways to “extract” additional detail from the “admittedly imperfect data that’s collected in a place that doesn’t have random sampling,” according to Lipsitch.

Lipsitch said studies over the past year show that taking data from hospital populations can be a cheaper alternative to random sampling of the general population.

Lipsitch pointed out that seemingly constant factors — such as genetic sequence, disease severity and contagiousness — can change over time as the virus mutates and the population develops resistance.

“What Covid has taught us is that actually it’s all surveillance issues,” he said. “All are changing through the pandemic.”

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Cedarville University students try to help sick professor Chuck Elliott find a new kidney https://jasonpowers.org/cedarville-university-students-try-to-help-sick-professor-chuck-elliott-find-a-new-kidney/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:50:08 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/cedarville-university-students-try-to-help-sick-professor-chuck-elliott-find-a-new-kidney/ “Being part of this project has given me insight into an area of ​​suffering that is not commonly talked about,” said Sarah Force, a communications and worship leader from Springfield, Pennsylvania. “I didn’t really understand the difficulty of waiting for an organ and what it was like. I will be advocating for organ donation long […]]]>

“Being part of this project has given me insight into an area of ​​suffering that is not commonly talked about,” said Sarah Force, a communications and worship leader from Springfield, Pennsylvania. “I didn’t really understand the difficulty of waiting for an organ and what it was like. I will be advocating for organ donation long after this project.

The students have given their teacher a task that Elliott finds impossible to complete on his own, he said.

“The hardest part of it all wasn’t the physical aspect, although it was difficult. Ironically, it was because of the communication problem that I didn’t know what to do,” Elliott said. “All my doctors put a lot of pressure on me to be very proactive in finding a living donor. For me, that’s the most impossible part of it. I don’t have the courage to ask someone for something so important.

Elliott’s need for a donated kidney dates back to his 20-year teaching career at Hong Kong Baptist University in the former British Crown colony, where he began to suffer from debilitating headaches. Attributing the headaches to stress, the real source of the problem – high blood pressure – went untreated for years, leading to permanent kidney damage.

In the fall of 2021, Elliott was placed on the kidney transplant list and his kidneys failed in May 2022. As a result, doctors recommended Elliott start dialysis, which he undergoes for eight hours each night.

Elliott and his wife discussed how they want something good to come out of this difficult experience.

“By sharing the hard times, people can also share the good ones. When the kidney happens, it’s not a win because of me, it’s a win because of God,” Elliott said. “I have a group of people standing by my side who are sharing the joyous conclusion of how God is going to put it all together. And, there’s a great lesson in communication there. We’re getting to practice what we’re talking and now it comes down to saving someone’s life. It’s a pretty powerful thing.

Some Cedarville faculty and staff have pursued the idea of ​​being a match, but no match has been identified, the university said.

The students participating with Largent and Force are Madelyn Robey, a senior from West Chester who is majoring in marketing; Janessa Colburn, a communications major from Damascus, Oregon; Hannah Kuntz, a second-year communications student from Liberty Township; and Haley Thompson, a broadcasting major from Ruskin, Fla. Other students, including Laura King, a young communications student from Dublin, lead an advocacy effort for Elliot.

Potential kidney donors should contact The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center at wexnermedical.osu.edu/KidneyDonor or by phone: 800 293-8965 Option 3.

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Chicago professor OiYan Poon among affirmative action protesters amid Supreme Court oral arguments today https://jasonpowers.org/chicago-professor-oiyan-poon-among-affirmative-action-protesters-amid-supreme-court-oral-arguments-today/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 23:08:41 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/chicago-professor-oiyan-poon-among-affirmative-action-protesters-amid-supreme-court-oral-arguments-today/ CHICAGO (WLS) — Chicagoan OiYan Poon and her daughter spent Monday morning protesting on the steps of the Supreme Court. Poon co-wrote an amicus brief in support of affirmative action with more than 1,200 expert researchers and professors on Asian Americans and college access. “It was really important for me to be here because I’ve […]]]>

CHICAGO (WLS) — Chicagoan OiYan Poon and her daughter spent Monday morning protesting on the steps of the Supreme Court.

Poon co-wrote an amicus brief in support of affirmative action with more than 1,200 expert researchers and professors on Asian Americans and college access.

“It was really important for me to be here because I’ve been working on research on race and college access for 10, 15 years,” said Poon, who is currently a visiting professor of education at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Oral arguments began Monday morning on cases involving admissions policies at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina.

Students for Fair Admissions sued the schools in 2014, alleging discrimination against Asian American applicants.

The group is led by longtime conservative activist Edward Blum.

SEE ALSO | Chicago analysts intervene in Supreme Court case involving race-based affirmative action

He had previously enlisted white students to challenge the race-based admissions policy at the University of Texas and lost.

“Mr. Blum decided a long time ago that having white candidates challenging the systems is a less sympathetic casualty than, say, an Asian American candidate,” said Alvin Tillery, who heads from the Center for the Study of Diversity. & Democracy at Northwestern University.

In the 1960s, many colleges and universities began to consider the racial background of applicants in order to diversify their campuses.

Anthony S. Chen, a Northwestern professor of political science and sociology, is co-author of a book on affirmative action.

“What really stands out for you is that when you look at the development of affirmative action and college admissions over time, that’s how important the role this breed plays today is. limited compared to the role she played before. And that’s because the court said he had to play a limited role,” he said.

Based on its current makeup, many legal experts believe the High Court will end affirmative action in college admissions, which could also impact workplace diversity efforts.

“If the court goes so far as to endorse a completely colorblind approach to the law, it’s hard to overstate how dramatic the effect this could have on politics of all kinds across the country is,” Carolyn said. Shapiro, co-director of the Chicago-Kent’s Institute at the United States Supreme Court.

DePaul and Loyola universities as well as the University of Chicago have taken public stances on the Harvard and UNC cases, urging judges to maintain affirmative action.

Poon is worried, but hopeful.

“It feels like game seven in a very long battle. And hopefully we win and a diverse democracy wins,” she said.

Copyright © 2022 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

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Afraid of Kim’s nukes? Build a bunker, says South Korean teacher https://jasonpowers.org/afraid-of-kims-nukes-build-a-bunker-says-south-korean-teacher/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 07:56:16 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/afraid-of-kims-nukes-build-a-bunker-says-south-korean-teacher/ Lee says his shelter could protect him from a nuclear disaster and withstand a direct hit from a conventional missile Anthony Wallace Text size If North Korea launches a nuclear attack on the South, architecture professor Lee Tae-goo has a plan: He will retreat to his purpose-built bunker and remain underground for at least two […]]]>

Lee says his shelter could protect him from a nuclear disaster and withstand a direct hit from a conventional missile

Anthony Wallace

Text size

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Johnny Depp and Jeff Beck are suing a professor who accused them of plagiarism | Music https://jasonpowers.org/johnny-depp-and-jeff-beck-are-suing-a-professor-who-accused-them-of-plagiarism-music/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 19:11:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/johnny-depp-and-jeff-beck-are-suing-a-professor-who-accused-them-of-plagiarism-music/ Johnny Depp and Jeff Beck are suing teacher and folklorist Bruce Jackson over his allegations that the duo’s song Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade on their collaborative album 18 plagiarize a poem written by an incarcerated man. In August, Jackson accused Depp and Beck of taking lines from the poem he documented in his 1974 book Get […]]]>

Johnny Depp and Jeff Beck are suing teacher and folklorist Bruce Jackson over his allegations that the duo’s song Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade on their collaborative album 18 plagiarize a poem written by an incarcerated man.

In August, Jackson accused Depp and Beck of taking lines from the poem he documented in his 1974 book Get Your Ass in the Water and Swim Like Me. Various lines appear in both works: “I’m in shreds, I know, but I ain’t got no stink / God bless the lady who’ll buy me a drink” and “What that awesome motherfucker really needs, child, is a bath.”

The poem has no definitive author but was told to Jackson by a Missouri State Penitentiary inmate named Slim Wilson. Neither Wilson nor Jackson were named co-writers of the track.

Following Jackson’s allegations, a spokesperson for the duo said they would review the claims and add additional copyright credits “if appropriate.”

But Rolling Stone Reports that the couple have now filed a lawsuit against Jackson for unspecified damages, legal fees and a statement that they have not committed copyright infringement. Their lawsuit claims that Jackson “does not own any copyright in the words” of the poem, only for his own recordings or transcriptions, which the couple claim not to have infringed.

Jackson told Rolling Stone, “They haven’t written a word of Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade and they’re suing the person they stole it from who caught them doing it. From my point of view, it’s like a burglar chasing a landlord because he cut his hand on the kitchen window he broke on entering.

Artwork for 18

The lawsuit claims that Jackson sent letters to Depp and Beck in August alleging “nearly every word” of the song was “copied from Hobo Ben, including the title.” He also allegedly suggested that the “inflection, key and rhythm” mirrored the recording he made of Slim Wilson giving the toast in the 1960s, and that Depp and Beck had sampled his recording to “build parts of the vocal track”.

The suit says Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade is an “original work of authorship and creativity”, but admits that “there may be certain elements” of the song that “mirror the lyrics” of Hobo Ben.

Lawyers for Jackson, Rachel and Michael Jackson – also his children – have called the lawsuit a “brazen attempt to distract the public from their repeated attempts to claim authorship of a song they did not write”. .

They accused Depp and Beck of hypocrisy for claiming it was not possible to copyright a toast while claiming authorship of Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade on album 18.

Their statement continued: “It is important to understand that Depp and Beck have not denied that the lyrics and vocal nuances performed on Sad Motherfuckin’ Parade appear to have been duplicated by Depp and Beck, that they appropriated When this story first broke, Depp and Beck released a statement to Rolling Stone saying that “where appropriate, additional credits will be added to all forms of the album.” they reneged on that promise?

Depp and Beck’s lawsuit described Jackson’s allegations as an “old-fashioned shakedown.” Jackson’s statement called their request a ‘publicity stunt’ and clarified that he had not made ‘formal financial requests’ to the pair, but said ‘any monies will be donated directly to organizations that reinforce his lifelong commitment to preserving African American culture and traditions. ”.

Depp and Beck’s album 18 received a mostly negative response from critics. In a two-star review, Michael Hann of The Guardian described it as “a particular and extremely uneven record”. In another two-star review, Mark Beaumont of the Independent said, “It’s hard enough to find a coherent purpose for it, beyond just a Hollywood slap in the face.”

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The Mind of a Teacher: English Teacher, CHC Director Dr. Chauna Craig | Culture https://jasonpowers.org/the-mind-of-a-teacher-english-teacher-chc-director-dr-chauna-craig-culture/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 18:07:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/the-mind-of-a-teacher-english-teacher-chc-director-dr-chauna-craig-culture/ “Never in my life have I had such a caring and compassionate teacher as Dr. Craig,” said Madison Reddick (junior, music). Caring, compassionate, helpful and encouraging are some of the words students who have taken classes with Dr. Chauna Craig have used to describe her. Dr Craig has taught at the IUP since 2000 according […]]]>

“Never in my life have I had such a caring and compassionate teacher as Dr. Craig,” said Madison Reddick (junior, music).

Caring, compassionate, helpful and encouraging are some of the words students who have taken classes with Dr. Chauna Craig have used to describe her.

Dr Craig has taught at the IUP since 2000 according to a curriculum vitae available on the IUP website. She is currently a professor in the Department of English, as well as Principal of Cook Honors College (CHC).

But, as is the case with almost all other teachers, she is not limited to the classroom.

Originally from Montana, Craig enjoys spending her free time traveling and hiking, which she does occasionally with her dog. Over the past summer, she has visited and hiked in Alaska, Oregon and Colorado.

“I used to take [the mountains] taken for granted when I lived in Montana because I was surrounded by it, but after moving to Pennsylvania I realized how much I love nature,” Craig said.

Craig’s love of nature goes beyond simply appreciating the setting and hiking, and spills over into some of his other passions, like writing.

Although she didn’t notice it at first, Craig says after reading a review of her latest book, ‘Wings & Other Things’, she realized how much her passion for nature flowed into her writing. , as the reviewer pointed out that it portrays the natural setting vividly. Looking back, Craig would even say that nature played a role in inspiring him while writing the book.

However, the main inspirations for “Wings & Other Things” were early feminist texts, as the book is made up of a collection of short stories, each focusing on women feeling stuck in their lives, as well as the act of “spreading their wings” and taking off.

“[These texts] were deeply important to women’s literature, so I wanted to pay homage to them,” Craig said.

“Wings & Other Things” is not Craig’s first book, however. According to review aggregator website “Goodreads,” she is credited with writing two other books: “The Widow’s Guide to Edible Mushrooms,” in which she is credited as the sole author, and “Permafrost Vol. 38.” , edited by Jaclyn Bergamino and written in collaboration with 38 other writers.

Her first book, however, was never published, as she wrote it when she was five years old.

“I wrote my first book when I was five and it was about a family of mice celebrating Christmas, so you know…a total rip off of ‘A Mouse Family Christmas’, which was my favorite book ever. era,” Craig said.

According to Craig, it was her passion for reading and writing that led her to become a teacher. Craig said she needed to be in an environment where people liked to read and write, so she followed an academic path for as long as she could, and once she finished school, she became a teacher.

Craig looks back on his years of study with emotion. She says that most students would find it surprising to learn that in her undergraduate days, she was a sister of Delta Delta Delta (colloquially known as Tri Delta) sorority. However, her most nostalgic memories of her undergraduate years are not related to Greek life, but rather to when she was on her college radio station.

If she could talk to herself, Craig would tell her to take it easy on life decisions and explore lots of possibilities. A tip that Craig finds useful for current undergraduates as well.

“I wish I had been less scared and had a little more confidence in myself,” she said.

A lover of nature and literature, Craig is not only a teacher, but also a writer and a role model for her students.

“Dr. Craig goes above and beyond for his students, whether inside or outside the classroom,” said Milady Lagunas (junior, political science). of the most interesting I had at the specialized college and I really enjoyed it!”

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World’s first knitting teacher retires https://jasonpowers.org/worlds-first-knitting-teacher-retires/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 09:07:53 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/worlds-first-knitting-teacher-retires/ Tilak Dias’ academic career started when he joined the University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka as an Assistant Lecturer in Knitting Technology after earning a “Diplom-Ingenieur” degree in Textile Engineering with Summa Cum Laude from the Technische Universität Dresden in 1981. In 1988 he obtained a ‘Dr.-Ingenieur’ also in textile engineering with Magna Cum Laude from […]]]>

Tilak Dias’ academic career started when he joined the University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka as an Assistant Lecturer in Knitting Technology after earning a “Diplom-Ingenieur” degree in Textile Engineering with Summa Cum Laude from the Technische Universität Dresden in 1981. In 1988 he obtained a ‘Dr.-Ingenieur’ also in textile engineering with Magna Cum Laude from the Universität Stuttgart.

World-class research

After serving the University of Moratuwa for over a decade, Tilak joined the Department of Textiles at UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, now the University of Manchester) in 1992, with the vision of conduct world-class research with technologists and researchers working at the forefront of knitting systems research.

During the early years of his tenure at UMIST, Tilak focused his research on quality control and assurance of the knitting process; his doctoral research at the Institut fὕr Textil- und Verfahrenstechnik (ITV) Denkendorf provided the impetus for this line of research which resulted in the development of intelligent microprocessor-based thread delivery systems to control the stitch length of fabrics produced on computerized flat knitting machines and circular knitting machines with a very high degree of precision.

Technical medical textiles

The integration of mechatronic systems with flat knitting machines has revolutionized weft knitting technology, where the needles, stitch cam settings, fabric shrinkage and needle bed draw-off are controlled very precisely by hand. using microprocessors. This technology was first introduced by machine manufacturer Stoll GmbH for the knitting industry to improve modeling and shaping efficiency.

However, Tilak realized as early as 1990 the potential of this technology as a tool for creating complex, seamless 3D shell structures and shaped spacer structures for non-fashion related applications, and decided to use this technology as a platform to develop a new area of ​​research. knitted medical textiles, designed for a pre-determined functionality, e.g. medical products/devices formed in three dimensions to conform to the patient’s medical needs, by merging flat knitting and 3D body scanning technologies.

electronic textiles

In 2002 Tilak expanded his research into the integration of electronics into textiles and is the most established academic in the UK to have embarked on this line of research. His research at UMIST resulted in a number of groundbreaking inventions – the Scan2Knit custom compression stocking technology in 2002 (marketed by Advanced Therapeutic Materials Ltd.) and the technology to produce three-dimensionally shaped shoe uppers seamless in 2004, with his colleague William Hurley. , which resulted in the now famous Nike ‘FlyKnit’. A spin-off company SmartLife Technology was also created by UMIST to exploit Tilak’s research into knitted electrodes, conductive pathways, and stretch sensors.

knitting teacher

Tilak then joined Nottingham Trent University (NTU) in 2010 as a Professor of Knitting and formed the Advanced Textiles Research Group (ATRG) within the Nottingham School of Art and Design in 2011, to pursue his vision research on advanced knit structures and electronic textiles.

The perception of the title of Tilak, the teacher of knitting, which is a craft activity, is very different from some of the research he has undertaken, such as the development of infurrable wire mesh for satellite technology – Using advanced textiles to enhance UK-based technology and manufacturing capability in the US satellite space telecommunications industry.

During the final phase of his college career at NTU, Tilak invented a technology to embed micro-semiconductor devices into yarn fibers to produce smart e-textiles.

Keynote speaker Will Hurley, a co-investigator on the project, says electronic yarns have the potential to revolutionize the textile industry and industries that use textiles.  © NTU.

Tilak has supervised 25 doctorates and 5 MPhil and was named inventor on 80 patents. His research has resulted in the establishment of three UK-based academic ventures and he has given over 60 guest lectures. Tilak also edited the first book on e-textiles and is the author of over 180 scientific papers for leading international journals and research conferences.

Nottingham School of Art and Design

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