Professor – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 10:00:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Professor – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 How we chose the list of companies https://jasonpowers.org/how-we-chose-the-list-of-companies/ Tue, 17 May 2022 10:00:31 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/how-we-chose-the-list-of-companies/ A year ago, the ninth annual Disruptor 50 list was born under very different circumstances. A year ago, companies were going public at a record pace and using a variety of tools to access public markets. We expected the companies on last year’s list to come out quickly, and many of them did. The party […]]]>

A year ago, the ninth annual Disruptor 50 list was born under very different circumstances. A year ago, companies were going public at a record pace and using a variety of tools to access public markets. We expected the companies on last year’s list to come out quickly, and many of them did. The party was raging.

A year later, the music stopped. Most new public companies were left without a president, and many fell through. Meanwhile, those who have remained deprived are, to extend the metaphor, floating in the air. They may still have high valuations, but there is little point in having them test the public markets.

Public or private, however, start-ups face the same market conditions: rising costs, rising wages, rising interest rates, supply chain disruptions, strong but jittery consumption, and businesses wondering if they must continue to invest in growth or begin to prepare times. The companies on the Disruptor 50 2022 list face these challenges, but they also represent the way forward, a chance to innovate out of a new crisis.

More CNBC Disruptor 50 2022 coverage

Disruptive innovation is anti-inflationary by definition. Classic disruption targets a set of new technologies at a problem and finds a solution that is both better and cheaper. Disruptors 2022 aim for a wide range of solutions, unraveling supply chains, controlling carbon emissions, democratizing access to financial services and improving health outcomes for vulnerable populations.

We anticipate that the 50 companies on this tenth annual list will continue to grow and innovate while inspiring change in their biggest incumbent competitors as we follow them through this year and next. Many, perhaps more than ever, will become long-lasting Disruptor 50 businesses.

This year, six Disruptors made the list for the fourth time. Impossible Foods made the list for the fifth time (it first made the list in 2015, at a time when it barely had enough product for a live taste test). Stripe is an eight-time Disruptor 50, joining Airbnb as the only companies in the history of the list with this distinction, and its $95 billion valuation is the richest in the Disruptor 50’s 10-year history.

But Stripe is the outlier. The bulk of the 2022 list is made up of companies that have only earned a spot for the first or second time. It’s a sign of a generational shift in the Disruptor 50, from a group of companies that took advantage of the emerging ubiquity of smartphones and emerged from the depths of the Great Recession, to a new generation of startups. -mission-driven ups born in an era of social and political upheaval but (mostly) favorable market conditions, suddenly facing the possibility of a recession and, most likely, a much longer path to the public markets .

Here’s how we picked this year’s list:

All private, independent startups founded after January 1, 2007 were eligible to be nominated for the Disruptor 50 list. Nominated companies were required to submit a detailed analysis, including key quantitative and qualitative information.

Quantitative metrics included company-submitted data on workforce size and diversity, scalability, and sales and user growth. Some of this information was not recorded and was only used for scoring purposes. CNBC also brought data from a pair of outside partners – PitchBook, which provided data on fundraising, implied valuations and investor quality; and IBISWorldwhose database of industry reports we use to compare companies based on the industries they are trying to disrupt.

CNBC’s Disruptor 50 Advisory Council – a group of 55 leading thinkers in innovation and entrepreneurship from around the world (see list of members below) – then ranked the quantitative criteria by importance and ability to disrupt established industries and state-owned enterprises. This year, the board again found that scalability and user growth were the most important criteria, followed by sales growth and the use of breakthrough technologies (including, most often, artificial intelligence and machine learning). These categories received the highest weighting, but the ranking model is designed to ensure companies score high on a wide range of criteria to make the final list.

Companies were also asked to submit important qualitative information, including descriptions of their primary business model, ideal customers, and recent company milestones. A team of more than 30 CNBC editorial staff, including TV anchors, reporters and producers, as well as CNBC.com writers and editors, as well as numerous advisory board members, read the submissions. and provided overall qualitative assessments of each company.

Qualitative scores were combined with a weighted quantitative score to determine which 50 companies made the list and in what order.

Special thanks to the CNBC Disruptor 50 2022 Advisory Board, who once again volunteered their time and insights. As always, we appreciate their contributions:

  • Rob Adams, Managing Partner, Congress Avenue Ventures and Fellow of the University of Texas IC2 Institute
  • Ron Adner, Professor, Dartmouth College Tuck School of Business
  • Anita Anantharam, Professor, University of Florida
  • Suzanne Bergmeister, Executive Director, James Madison University Gilliam Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Edward Blair, Chair of Entrepreneurship, University of Houston
  • Robert Brunner, Disruption Director, University of Illinois Gies College of Business
  • Candida Brush, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Babson College
  • Howard W. Buffett, President, Global Impact LLC and Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • John Sibley Butler, Professor, University of Texas
  • Gary Chan, Professor, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Jim Chung, Associate Vice President for Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, George Washington University
  • Shawn Clark, Professor/Director, Penn State University
  • Benjamin M. Cole, Endowed Chair in Entrepreneurship, Fordham University Gabelli School of Business
  • Chris Coleridge, Principal Faculty of Management Practice, University of Cambridge
  • Jason D’Mello, Associate Professor, Loyola Marymount University
  • Donna De Carolis, Dean, Drexel University Close School of Entrepreneurship
  • Monica Dean, Executive Director, University of Southern California Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership
  • Judi Eyles, Director, Iowa State University Pappajohn Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Clare Gately, Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Waterford Institute of Technology and EDHEC Business School
  • Ari Ginsberg, Professor of Entrepreneurship and Management, New York University Stern School of Business
  • Michael Goldberg, Executive Director, Case Western Reserve University Veale Institute for Entrepreneurship
  • Michael Goldsby, Emeritus Professor of Entrepreneurship, Ball State University
  • Henrich R. Greve, Professor of Entrepreneurship, INSEAD
  • Anil K. Gupta, President and Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, University of Maryland
  • Mike Haynie, Vice Chancellor and Professor of Entrepreneurship, Syracuse University
  • Lisa Hehenberger, Associate Professor and Director, Esade Business School Center for Social Impact
  • Michael Hendron, Academic Director and Associate Professor, Brigham Young University-Provo Rollins Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Keith Hmieleski, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Texas Christian University
  • Jim Jindrick, Director of Corporate Engagement (retired), University of Arizona
  • Neil Kane, Assistant Professor and ESTEEM Program Director, University of Notre Dame
  • Sandra Kauanui, Director, Daveler & Kauanui School of Entrepreneurship at Florida Gulf Coast University
  • Donald F. Kuratko, Distinguished Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship, Indiana University-Bloomington Kelley School of Business
  • Rob Lalka, Professor of Business and Executive Director, Tulane University Freeman School of Business Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • Debra Lam, Executive Director, Georgia Tech Partnership for Inclusive Innovation
  • Marie Josée Lamothe, Professor, McGill University
  • Vincent Lewis, Associate Vice President, Entrepreneurial Initiatives, University of Dayton
  • Alex McKelvie, Associate Dean and Professor of Entrepreneurship, Syracuse University Whitman School of Management
  • Scott Newbert, Academic Director, Baruch College Field Programs in Entrepreneurship
  • Dan Olszewski, Director, University of Wisconsin-Madison Weinert Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Banu Ozkazanc-Pan, Associate Professor of Engineering Practice, Brown University
  • Gerhard Plaschka, Professor, DePaul University
  • Julia Prats, Professor of Entrepreneurship, IESE Business School
  • Jeff Reid, Professor of Practice and Founding Director, Georgetown University Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Lyneir Richardson, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice, Rutgers Business School
  • Matthew Rutherford, Professor and President, Oklahoma State University
  • Amelia Schaffner, Founding Director, Emory University Goizueta Business School Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation
  • Mark Schenkel, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Belmont University
  • Albert Segars, Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • John H. Shannon, Professor, Seton Hall University
  • Lewis Sheats, Director, Saint Louis University Chaifetz Center for Entrepreneurship
  • Robert Stein, Executive Director, University of Pittsburgh Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence
  • Thales Teixeira, co-founder and CEO, Decoupling.co and Fmr. Professor, Harvard Business School
  • David Touve, Senior Director, University of Virginia Darden School of Business Batten Institute
  • Ari Wallach, CEO, Longpath Labs
  • David Zvilichovsky, Senior Academic Professor, Tel Aviv University and Professor of Global Modular Courses, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School

Sign up for our quirky weekly newsletter that goes beyond the annual Disruptor 50 list, offering deeper insight into the companies making the list and their innovative founders.

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KV-Gyanvapi Question: Lucknow University Faculty Association Unanimously Supports Dalit Professor https://jasonpowers.org/kv-gyanvapi-question-lucknow-university-faculty-association-unanimously-supports-dalit-professor/ Sun, 15 May 2022 16:47:39 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/kv-gyanvapi-question-lucknow-university-faculty-association-unanimously-supports-dalit-professor/ The Lucknow University Professors Association (LUTA) has unanimously passed a resolution in favor of its Dalit professor Ravi Kant Chandan who is in the eye of the storm following his remarks during an online debate on the issue of the Kashi Vishwanath-Gyanvapi temple complex. The association, during the meeting of its executive committee on Saturday, […]]]>

The Lucknow University Professors Association (LUTA) has unanimously passed a resolution in favor of its Dalit professor Ravi Kant Chandan who is in the eye of the storm following his remarks during an online debate on the issue of the Kashi Vishwanath-Gyanvapi temple complex.

The association, during the meeting of its executive committee on Saturday, described as “unilateral” and “unfair” the action of the university to demand an explanation from his colleague for his remarks made in the debate.

Some people had objected to a quote given by Ravi Kant Chandan, associate professor of Hindi at the University of Lucknow, during the debate.

“This unilateral action by the university administration to demand an explanation from a teacher is unfair. On May 10, a group of students stormed inside Lucknow University, harassed Ravi Kant and shouted objectionable slogans in indecent and innately angry language,” LUTA said in its resolution.

“An unpleasant incident could have happened to Ravi Kant,” the association said. He demanded strict action from the university administration against all those involved in this incident.

The LUTA executive regretted that the police administration did not follow up on Ravi Kant’s letter and felt that ex parte action was not warranted, said Vineet Kumar Verma and Rajendra Kumar Verma , respectively president and general secretary of LUTA.

LUTA’s stance comes days after hundreds of Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) activists staged a protest on the campus of Lucknow University (LU) on Tuesday (May 10), demanding an apology from Ravi Kant Chandan for his alleged derogatory remarks made during a televised debate. on the Kashi Vishwanath temple in the context of recent developments on an investigation by Maa Shringar Gauri Sthal in the Kashi Vishwanath-Gyanvapi complex in Varanasi.

FIR AGAINST PROF

Aman Dubey, a student at the University of Lucknow (LU) and an inmate of the LBS hostel, filed an FIR against Professor Ravi Kant Chandan, accusing him on Tuesday of disrupting the social fabric of LU with his alleged remarks derogatory and reprehensible about the Kashi Vishwanath temple. Hasanganj police filed a complaint against Kant for “promoting enmity, hurting religious feelings and misusing the computer platform to spread hatred”.

The student alleged that the professor’s comment brought discredit to the institution.

For his part, Ravi Kant Chandan filed a complaint with the police alleging that ABVP activists and other “chaotic elements” tried to kill him on campus on Tuesday for his remarks.

The comments came during an online debate hosted by Satya Hindi, a Hindi language news platform. The professor cited a story from freedom fighter Pattabhi Sitaramayya’s book “Of Feathers and Stones”, which describes the alleged circumstances in which a temple at the disputed location was destroyed and a mosque erected in its place.

“They used abusive words against me and tried to kill me on the college campus. The defendant also brandished slogans like ‘Desh ke traitors ko goli maaro’ (kill the traitors of the country) and made caste remarks against me as I come from the Dalit community,” Chandan said in his complaint.

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Lunar eclipse scheduled for Sunday evening; professor at Wheaton in Norton says it will be “very cool” | Local News https://jasonpowers.org/lunar-eclipse-scheduled-for-sunday-evening-professor-at-wheaton-in-norton-says-it-will-be-very-cool-local-news/ Sat, 14 May 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/lunar-eclipse-scheduled-for-sunday-evening-professor-at-wheaton-in-norton-says-it-will-be-very-cool-local-news/ A total lunar eclipse arrives Sunday evening and promises to be a cosmic wonder if the weather is favorable for viewing. The full moon will be in a “Super Moon” phase as well as a “Blood Moon” phase, which means it will be red in appearance. The eclipse is expected to begin around 9:30 p.m. […]]]>

A total lunar eclipse arrives Sunday evening and promises to be a cosmic wonder if the weather is favorable for viewing.

The full moon will be in a “Super Moon” phase as well as a “Blood Moon” phase, which means it will be red in appearance.

The eclipse is expected to begin around 9:30 p.m. and continue through the early morning hours Monday, and if the weather holds, it will be visible across most of North America.

The weather forecast in these regions, however, calls for possible cloudy skies on Sunday evening.

A lunar eclipse involves the earth passing between the moon and the sun, with the earth’s shadow sweeping across the moon.

“A total lunar eclipse is always very cool,” said Dipankar Maitra, associate professor of astronomy at Wheaton College in Norton, although he admitted he finds total solar eclipses “the coolest”.

“I would definitely watch it and encourage everyone to watch this amazing phenomenon,” Maitra said. “Whether you use only your eyes, a pair of binoculars or a telescope, the eclipsed moon will be spectacular.”

The moon will be quite low in the sky for this area when the eclipse begins.

“This can provide photographers with exciting opportunities to frame the fully eclipsed moon with interesting terrestrial objects in the foreground,” Maitra said. “I expect to see incredible images in the days following the eclipse. Personally, I will have my eyes glued to the eyepiece of my telescope.

Although Wheaton restarted his open nights at his observatory at the start of the spring semester, now that the semester is over, those are over.

“We are not holding any public events related to the eclipse because most students will have left campus by then,” Maitra said. He noted that the eclipse will occur quite late in the evening – the total eclipse begins around 11:30 p.m. Sunday and the maximum eclipse occurs shortly after midnight.

This is the first of two total lunar eclipses visible from the United States this year. The next one is November 7.

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Associate Professor Gianni Renda makes history as the first medical technology designer to be awarded a Researcher in Industry (REDI) Exchange and Development Fellowship https://jasonpowers.org/associate-professor-gianni-renda-makes-history-as-the-first-medical-technology-designer-to-be-awarded-a-researcher-in-industry-redi-exchange-and-development-fellowship/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:40:50 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/associate-professor-gianni-renda-makes-history-as-the-first-medical-technology-designer-to-be-awarded-a-researcher-in-industry-redi-exchange-and-development-fellowship/ The Head of the Department of Architectural and Industrial Design, Associate Professor Gianni Renda, received a Researcher Exchange and Development Within Industry (REDI) Scholarship in partnership with Swinburne and an industry partner EDI Groupa design and engineering consultancy working in all medical technologies, including diagnostics, drug delivery, respiratory care, radiology, radiotherapy, surgical tools and equipment, […]]]>

The Head of the Department of Architectural and Industrial Design, Associate Professor Gianni Renda, received a Researcher Exchange and Development Within Industry (REDI) Scholarship in partnership with Swinburne and an industry partner EDI Groupa design and engineering consultancy working in all medical technologies, including diagnostics, drug delivery, respiratory care, radiology, radiotherapy, surgical tools and equipment, portable therapeutic devices and medical devices. diagnostic monitoring.

This is the first time that a REDI grant has been awarded to a medical technology developer. Associate Professor Renda has spent many years investigating ways in which design can empower the user in the field of health, disability and aging. Its REDI Fellowship award recognizes the important role that design plays in the use, adoption and discontinuation of medical devices; whether it is an insulin pen used by an elderly diabetic or a specialized surgical tool by a highly trained doctor.

As part of the fellowship, Associate Professor Renda will undertake a 12-month project with EDI Group. IDE Group’s mission is to improve lives. Their interdisciplinary team specializes in finding solutions to complex problems and helping partners successfully manage intellectual property issues and the journey to market. Together with Eudaemon TechnologiesAssociate Professor Renda will help graduate designers understand how best to engage in the field of medical device development and how to integrate user-centered design practices into a heavily regulated industry.

Associate Professor Renda says this project is key to creating a better future. “The project will equip design graduates with knowledge and exposure to systems in a context of design-driven innovation,” he said.

“This type of design process enables designers to contribute more meaningfully and comprehensively to the medical device industry and further advance the medical technology sectors in Victoria and Australia.”

Group Director, Connected Care, IDE Group Andrea Ranzoni says IDE Group is proud to support Associate Professor Renda and the REDI Fellowship Program to help create a training program for future entrepreneurs in the Medtech space.

“Through this program, our Associate Professor Renda will be able to articulate the importance and benefits of operating within a quality management system, with a focus on how to integrate the principles user-centered design in the early stages of medical device development. »

the REDI The fellowship program is part of MTPConnect’s $32 million Researcher Development and Exchange Initiative (REDI), funded by the Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF). The REDI Fellowship Program provides financial support to companies in the medical technology, biotechnology and pharmaceutical (MTP) sector to bring in-house MTP researchers, clinicians and professionals for up to 12 months to work on priority medical research projects.

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Tom Rohlen, Asian Studies professor and educator at Stanford, has died https://jasonpowers.org/tom-rohlen-asian-studies-professor-and-educator-at-stanford-has-died/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:30:07 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/tom-rohlen-asian-studies-professor-and-educator-at-stanford-has-died/ Thomas Rohlen, professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE) and Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), died on March 6, 2022. He was 81. Tom Rohlen (Image credit: Courtesy of Stanford News Library) Rohlen was a beloved educator and a fundamental figure in the development of many […]]]>

Thomas Rohlen, professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE) and Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), died on March 6, 2022. He was 81.

Tom Rohlen (Image credit: Courtesy of Stanford News Library)

Rohlen was a beloved educator and a fundamental figure in the development of many academic programs and lectures at Stanford. His academic interests covered a wide range of topics in contemporary Asian studies, with a particular focus on Japan and issues surrounding Japanese economy, education, and society.

“He was an awfully charming and engaging person who knew a lot about Japanese youth culture, spoke Japanese very well and was an excellent ethnographer,” said Martin Carnoya friend and colleague of Rohlen at GSE.

Rohlen was born October 29, 1940 and grew up in Winnetka, Illinois. “My father was passionately interested in people – what motivated them, how personal and cultural issues influenced their life direction, and how those influences affected their conceptualization of fulfillment,” said Duke, Rohlen’s son. “This relentless quest to understand and help people was central to his personal, professional and philanthropic choices and it is what made him such an interesting, accomplished and compassionate human being.”

Rohlen began his academic career as an undergraduate student at Princeton University in 1962. After a stint in the U.S. Foreign Service in Japan from 1962 to 1965, he earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1970. His first college appointment as a professor was at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Prior to coming to Stanford, he also spent time as a visiting scholar at the University of Hawaii, the University of Toronto at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and worked with Edwin Reischauer, founder of the Japan Harvard Institute and former United States Ambassador to Japan. , as Reischauer Professor at Harvard University.

His expertise was recognized and appreciated by his colleagues and students. “The graduate students of the program who have worked with him have benefited greatly from Tom’s skills in understanding the cultural dimensions of different educational systems and from his masterful command of the research methods of cultural anthropology,” said his fellow professor. GSE. Hans N. Weiler. “To his students and colleagues, he gave freely of his time and insight into the depths of Japanese culture and society.”

At FSI, Rohlen was instrumental in creating the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), which was formally founded in 1983 as the culmination of the work of a visionary group of Stanford scholars determined to strengthen U.S.-Asian ties and address the need for a center interdisciplinary research on Asia that links disciplines and examines Asia in global regions and contexts. Rohlen’s long tenure at APARC reflected not only his deep expertise in Japan, but also his belief in the importance of geopolitical relations between the Asia-Pacific region and his relationship with the United States.

“Tom was a wonderful supporter of what we do at APARC,” said Tibia Gi-Wook, current director of Shorenstein APARC. “I always enjoyed the chats we had over lunch and on other occasions and I will miss him.”

Rohlen’s career at Stanford drew on his experience in the U.S. Foreign Service in Japan, which informed both his research and his support for transpacific initiatives to bring East and West closer together. In 1988, Rohlen brought his leadership and institute-building skills back to Japan, where he served as founding director of the Stanford Japan Center in Kyoto until 1990.

Throughout her career, Rohlen has exemplified FSI’s mission to serve at the intersection of research, teaching, and policy. His experience in public service is an early example of FSI faculty expertise based on both academic research and field experience in government and outreach.

In addition to benefiting from Rohlen’s academic professionalism and exemplary teaching, FSI has also been a grateful recipient of his immense philanthropy. Generous donations from the Rohlen family helped establish the Oksenberg Rohlen Fund and the Payne Lectureship, which provide funds to distinguished visiting scholars at FSI. Additionally, the Thomas Rohlen Senior Fellow Fund supports a senior FSI scholar who typically focuses on political economy, trade, international relations, security, and East Asian politics. Past fellows and lecturers from these endowments include Thomas Fingar, former deputy director of the National Intelligence for Analysis and chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and Rose Gottemoeller, former deputy secretary general of NATO.

“Tom Rohlen was an honorable, creative and direct guy. It was also a pleasure to work with him,” said the former FSI manager. Coitus D. Blacker. “He played a pivotal role in the creation and further development of all of our Japan-centric programs during his long tenure at Shorenstein APARC. FSI – and Stanford – are better institutions thanks to the tireless efforts and remarkable generosity of Tom .

Rohlen is survived by his wife Shelagh, his children Ginger, Katie, Duke, Brooks, Alison and Michael, his stepchildren Karen, Jean and Sarah and 19 grandchildren.

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The X-Men’s Banshee May Have Shaped Magneto More Than Professor X https://jasonpowers.org/the-x-mens-banshee-may-have-shaped-magneto-more-than-professor-x/ Sun, 08 May 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/the-x-mens-banshee-may-have-shaped-magneto-more-than-professor-x/ A forgotten X-Men story revealed that Professor X may have had less of an impact on Magneto’s life than he thinks – and that Banshee shaped him instead! the x-menit is banshee may have secretly shaped Magneto even more so than Professor X. The story of Erik Magnus Lensherr is legendary in the history of […]]]>

A forgotten X-Men story revealed that Professor X may have had less of an impact on Magneto’s life than he thinks – and that Banshee shaped him instead!

the x-menit is banshee may have secretly shaped Magneto even more so than Professor X. The story of Erik Magnus Lensherr is legendary in the history of the mutant race; a Holocaust survivor, he is dedicated to ensuring that the mutant race never suffers the same fate. His methods, however, were very different from those of his old friend Charles Xavier, and the two clashed countless times.

There are, however, many gaps in Magneto’s story; entire decades of operating in the shadows, his actions unknown. Ironically, Marvel’s slippery timeline means these gaps simply grow in size; by most estimates he has only been known to the world for a few decades, although it is accepted that during this time he has become a force to be reckoned with. It raises the tantalizing question of what Magneto did between his escape from the Holocaust and the modern era.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Even Marvel Mocks The Super-Sexual X-Men Of The 1990s

A curious clue is offered in Scott Lobdell and Tom Grummett’s Generation X #10-11. This two-part story saw the Generation X team uncover the secret history of their mentor Banshee; that decades ago, when he was an Interpol agent, Sean Cassidy hunted the serial killer who was destined to become Omega Red. Emma Frost learned of this by entering Banshee’s mind, and she was shocked to discover that Banshee had help from an unexpected source; Magneto.


Gen X Banshee Magneto

The comic implies that a mysterious shadow war was underway, long before the formation of Charles Xavier’s X-Men and Magneto’s evil brotherhood. At this point, Magneto seems dedicated to trying to keep mutants from being weaponized, while he also uses assets such as Banshee to hunt down mutants who would cause a genetic civil war. The irony, of course, is that Magneto himself will eventually become the man campaigning for war between humans and mutants.


Emma senses there is more to Banshee and Magneto’s relationship than just the glimpse she saw; that was just the beginning. Plus, she thinks this untold story is more important to Magneto’s life than anyone realizes. that Banshee had something to do with Magneto’s transformation into the monster he would become. If Emma Frost is right, Charles Xavier didn’t have as much influence over Magneto as he believed; once from him x-men done, but banshee kept his secret all these years, and neither he nor Magneto never showed the slightest suspicion of intending to reveal the truth.


More: Rogue X-Men Cosplay Proves The Powerful Hero Shouldn’t Be Wasted

Iron Man offers HellCat

Iron Man is officially on his famous MCU romance


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CMU Professor Explains How Rising Interest Rates Will Affect Your Portfolio | Business https://jasonpowers.org/cmu-professor-explains-how-rising-interest-rates-will-affect-your-portfolio-business/ Sat, 07 May 2022 08:44:45 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/cmu-professor-explains-how-rising-interest-rates-will-affect-your-portfolio-business/ MID-MICHIGAN (WJRT) – Inflation is still near levels not seen in decades. In an effort to fix the problem, the Federal Reserve is raising interest rates by half a percentage point – the biggest increase in more than 20 years. “The Fed is raising interest rates as a way to ease off and put the […]]]>

MID-MICHIGAN (WJRT) – Inflation is still near levels not seen in decades.

In an effort to fix the problem, the Federal Reserve is raising interest rates by half a percentage point – the biggest increase in more than 20 years.

“The Fed is raising interest rates as a way to ease off and put the brakes on to try to slow the economy down,” said Jason Taylor, an economics professor at Central Michigan University.

Although the move is expected, the increase could cause some consumers to forego more money than before.

Whether it’s paying off a credit card, trying to secure a mortgage or receiving a student loan, Taylor said the amount of interest paid could take a bigger chunk out of personal budgets.

“The prime rate, the most relevant interest rate for people, could go up to 6%, from 3 or 3.5% just a few months ago,” he said. he declares.

On the other hand, those who invest the money could see a positive long-term impact.

“If you’re a saver, low interest is not your friend. Now you can put your money in a bank account or certificate of deposit or something and start earning positive interest on that,” Taylor said.

This is not the last rate hike Americans can expect. In March, the Federal Reserve announced its intention to raise interest rates up to six times this year.

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UVA Law School Professor Discusses SCOTUS Violation https://jasonpowers.org/uva-law-school-professor-discusses-scotus-violation/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:36:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/uva-law-school-professor-discusses-scotus-violation/ CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) — As the United States Supreme Court reassesses the constitutionality of abortions, UVA School of Law professors are revealing what the violation of Justice Samuel Alito’s draft means for the future. “A leak of this magnitude never happened,” said Douglas Laycock, professor of constitutional law at UVA. After Monday night’s initial draft […]]]>

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) — As the United States Supreme Court reassesses the constitutionality of abortions, UVA School of Law professors are revealing what the violation of Justice Samuel Alito’s draft means for the future.

“A leak of this magnitude never happened,” said Douglas Laycock, professor of constitutional law at UVA.

After Monday night’s initial draft notice of the quashing of Roe v. Wade was made public, calls were made for an investigation to find out who was responsible for the breach of secrecy.

“There are about 80 people, including judges, clerks and employees of the printing office secretary, who have regular access to opinions. All 80 of them are suspects, including the judges,” Laycock said.

He says the leak could cause tension in the court.

“Relations within the court will be more difficult and less trusting for some time, but it’s very difficult to predict how that will play out, especially from the outside,” Laycock said.

If the leaker is caught, they expect a big punishment. Anyone other than a judge would be fired.

Laycock says the presence of a whistleblower puts pressure on the deliberation process, as votes can and often do change as drafts are released.

“A leak in a business case can change millions of dollars in the stock market. And whoever gets the word first benefits from those who didn’t,” Laycock said.

Laycock says opinions are often negotiated and it’s possible to see one with majority support lose a vote or two as the flow continues.

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Montgomery College mourns professor killed in pedestrian accident – ​​NBC4 Washington https://jasonpowers.org/montgomery-college-mourns-professor-killed-in-pedestrian-accident-nbc4-washington/ Tue, 03 May 2022 06:19:22 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/montgomery-college-mourns-professor-killed-in-pedestrian-accident-nbc4-washington/ Students and staff at Montgomery College are mourning the loss of a beloved educator, Eric Grosse, who was struck and killed last Thursday while jogging in Bethesda, Maryland. The 74-year-old was a part-time English teacher at the college’s Rockville campus. His colleagues said he will be remembered for his commitment to his students and colleagues. […]]]>

Students and staff at Montgomery College are mourning the loss of a beloved educator, Eric Grosse, who was struck and killed last Thursday while jogging in Bethesda, Maryland.

The 74-year-old was a part-time English teacher at the college’s Rockville campus. His colleagues said he will be remembered for his commitment to his students and colleagues.

“We have lost wisdom and an innovative, compassionate thinker,” said Elizabeth Benton, acting dean of English and reading. “He was an expert educator.”

There was no doubting Grosse’s love for teaching. He was a former dean who came out of retirement in 2015 to join the English department as a part-time faculty member.

Benton said Grosse was a tireless advocate for his students and colleagues. And it’s no surprise that she says the man who taught professional writing had a gift with words.

“His candor, his passion. He throws punches, I guess if I can say that, it’s just really nice to have as a member of the teaching team who tells you what he thinks, ”she said.

Investigators say Grosse was killed crossing the intersection of Tuckerman Lane and Kings Riding Way when he was struck by a driver, who remained at the scene. It is not known whether Grosse had activated the crossing signal before crossing the road.

His death stunned students and staff at the college’s Rockville campus, where he was scheduled to teach Monday night.

Even with the end of the semester, Benton said Grosse isn’t slowing down. This summer, he was going to work with students who were struggling to finish the semester on time.

“He had an air of commitment and caring,” she said. “He is truly committed to the art of teaching and to the mission of helping students and guiding them towards graduation.”

As of Monday night, students in Grosse’s writing class were still processing her death, but Benton says they are determined to move on.

“A lot of shock, a lot of tears, but a commitment to their work,” she said.

It is a commitment shown to them by their precious teacher who wanted nothing more than to see them succeed.

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history teacher awarded the LMU’s highest distinction | Education https://jasonpowers.org/history-teacher-awarded-the-lmus-highest-distinction-education/ Sun, 01 May 2022 04:29:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/history-teacher-awarded-the-lmus-highest-distinction-education/ Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) Vice President for Academic Affairs W. Mark Tew presented the prestigious Houston Award for Teaching Excellence to history professor Michael Toomey, PhD. The award was presented at LMU’s annual Student Awards and Recognition Night on April 19. The Houston Award honors faculty who have demonstrated exemplary professional teaching achievement characterized by […]]]>

Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) Vice President for Academic Affairs W. Mark Tew presented the prestigious Houston Award for Teaching Excellence to history professor Michael Toomey, PhD. The award was presented at LMU’s annual Student Awards and Recognition Night on April 19.

The Houston Award honors faculty who have demonstrated exemplary professional teaching achievement characterized by a clear, abundant, and persistent demonstration of high standards of teaching. A member of the faculty at the Paul V. Hamilton School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences since 2008, Toomey has risen through the ranks from assistant professor to full professor and served as assistant dean of the school for the past five years. He is also chairman of the Department of Humanities and Fine Arts. He served on the Registration Management and Coordinating Committee as well as the Fundraising Review Committee.

“Dr. Toomey is an excellent teacher and is very popular with students,” Lincoln professor of history and historian Charles Hubbard said in the nomination papers. “In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he has served as an advisor to the History Club and other student organizations.He works closely with students as a teacher and advisor.He encourages and contributes to the collegial atmosphere of the Paul V. Hamilton School of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Toomey runs the Lincoln Life and Legacy program that all LMU students must complete. In this role he produced the book In His Words, Readings from the Life of Abraham Lincoln (Kendal-Hint Publishers, 2014). The textbook is used by hundreds of LMU students enrolled in Lincoln 100.

“Dr. Toomey’s leadership was critical to the success of LMU’s Lincoln Courses,” says Associate Professor of English Jacques Debrot. “These courses are unique to the University and have shaped its core identity and highest ideals. “

Toomy has contributed numerous peer-reviewed book chapters, articles, and professional presentations. His research and teaching interests include American frontier history, Tennessee history, Native American history, and Appalachian history. He has worked closely on projects with renowned academics, including Dr. Earl Hess, Professor Emeritus at LMU.

Prior to joining the LMU faculty, Hess served as editor of the Journal of East Tennessee History from 1999 to 2010 and curator of history for the East Tennessee Historical Society from 1999 to 2007. He served as associate professor of history at the Knoxville College from 1991 to 1999 and served as Dean of Academic Affairs from 1997 to 1999. Toomey began his career as an associate professor in the history department at the University of Tennessee.

He was also a panelist for the Public Programs Division of the National Endowment for Humanities. Toomey was a historical consultant for television productions including “Who Do You Think You Are?” and “The Mysterious Lost State of Franklin”. He is a member of the East Tennessee Historical Society, Tennessee Historical Society, Southern Historical Association, and American Historical Association.

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