Health Career – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Wed, 28 Jul 2021 03:46:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Health Career – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 Who do we invent for? Patents by women focus more on women’s health, but few women get to invent https://jasonpowers.org/who-do-we-invent-for-patents-by-women-focus-more-on-womens-health-but-few-women-get-to-invent/ https://jasonpowers.org/who-do-we-invent-for-patents-by-women-focus-more-on-womens-health-but-few-women-get-to-invent/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 03:46:34 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/?p=91 Who do we invent for? Patents by women focus more on women’s health, but few women get to inventInvention and identity Members of social groups may be more likely to patent inventions targeted toward their own group’s needs and interests. Koning et al. examined US biomedical patents and found that although fewer women engage in commercial patenting compared with men, their patents are more likely to focus on women’s health (see the Perspective […]]]> Who do we invent for? Patents by women focus more on women’s health, but few women get to invent

Invention and identity

Members of social groups may be more likely to patent inventions targeted toward their own group’s needs and interests. Koning et al. examined US biomedical patents and found that although fewer women engage in commercial patenting compared with men, their patents are more likely to focus on women’s health (see the Perspective by Murray). In an evaluation of biomedical articles, the researchers found that women were also more likely to make scientific discoveries that might lead to women’s health patents. These findings demonstrate that a lack of representation among inventors translates into a lack of breadth in inventions.

Science, aba6990, this issue p. 1345; see also abh3178, p. 1260

Abstract

Women engage in less commercial patenting and invention than do men, which may affect what is invented. Using text analysis of all U.S. biomedical patents filed from 1976 through 2010, we found that patents with all-female inventor teams are 35% more likely than all-male teams to focus on women’s health. This effect holds over decades and across research areas. We also found that female researchers are more likely to discover female-focused ideas. These findings suggest that the inventor gender gap is partially responsible for thousands of missing female-focused inventions since 1976. More generally, our findings suggest that who benefits from innovation depends on who gets to invent.

The inventor gender gap is well established. Although progress has been made, women are still less likely to enter STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) occupations, less likely to continue in scientific careers, and less likely to become inventors (16). Even today, only 35% of STEM scientists and 13% of U.S. patent inventors are women, suggesting that there are many “lost Curies,” talented girls who never grow up to discover and invent (79).

Although the gap itself is cause for concern, its consequences may extend beyond the labor market (10). It is possible that women are more likely to invent for women, and if so, the dearth of female inventors may cause society to supply too few inventions that benefit women. Recent work suggests a shortage of projects, procedures, and products aimed at female patients’ needs (1113). Anecdotal evidence abounds that a disproportionate share of female-focused inventions—such as ovarian cancer tests, personalized breast cancer trials, and cataract-removal procedures [cataracts are more common in women than in men (14)]—are invented and brought to market by women (1517).

Yet, there is little systematic evidence on whether female-invented products are more likely to focus on the needs of women, especially in knowledge-intensive domains such as biomedicine. On the one hand, the lived experiences of female inventors may lead them to see opportunities to invent for people like themselves, specialize in clinical and disease areas that men may overlook, and invent with more knowledge of women’s health (18, 19). On the other hand, medical inventors generally have extensive training in MD and PhD programs, which could eliminate knowledge differences between male and female researchers. Furthermore, inventions follow market demand (20). It could be that inventors, male or female, simply invent where the market pulls them.

We measured the gender of inventors and the sex focus of their inventions for all U.S. biomedical patents filed between 1976 and 2010. We found that in this field, inventions by women are more likely to focus on the medical needs of women. This pattern is strongest for all-female invention teams, holds over decades, and is present even within narrow areas of invention. This last finding suggests that the female inventor-invention link is both the result of women working in more female-focused research areas and female inventors identifying opportunities to invent for women regardless of the area in which they work. We also analyzed biomedical research articles between 2002 and 2020 and found that female-discovered ideas are also more likely to be female-focused. That upstream research ideas also exhibit a female inventor-invention link further suggests that the gender gap in who commercializes their ideas has contributed to the sex gap in what types of ideas become inventions.

The starting point for our analysis was a new measure for a patent’s focus on the medical needs of men and/or women. We extracted the title, abstract, and start of the summary text from the 441,504 “Drugs and Medical” patents in the PatentsView-NBER (National Bureau of Economic Research) dataset. We then fed this text through the National Library of Medicine’s Medical Text Indexer (MTI) (21).

The MTI algorithm uses machine learning to map text to the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms that most likely reflect the text’s content. More details are provided in supplementary text S1.

The MeSH ontology includes two tags for the sex focus of the patent. A patent’s text gets the “Female” tag when it covers “female organs, diseases, physiologic processes, genetics, etc.” There is a parallel “Male” tag. We refer to the 12.76% of patents that the MTI tagged “Female” as female-focused patents. Conversely, 13.27% of patents are male-focused. In supplementary text S2, we validate the MTI algorithm, showing that it works well with patent text and that its accuracy is unbiased with respect to inventor gender. In supplementary text S3, we show that although the female and male MeSH tags are a coarse measure of sex focus, they capture meaningful differences in the likelihood that a patent benefits women or men. For example, with word-embedding methods and clinical-trial data, we show that female- and male-tagged patents are roughly 400% more likely to describe inventions that would be evaluated by a female- or male-only trial. Furthermore, with data on disease incidence, we show that patents tagged as female address diseases that affect roughly twice as many women; we found a similar pattern for male-tagged patents and men. We measured inventor gender using a standard dictionary-matching process (supplementary text S4). Our last sample includes 430,060 patents with inventor-gender and sex-focus measures.

Our first set of analyses explored raw trends in the gender composition of inventors. We did so by splitting our data into two groups: patents with majority-female inventing teams (≥50% women) and patents with strictly more male inventors (>50% men). In Fig. 1, we show that women-invented biomedical patents are on the rise, growing from 6.3% in 1976 to 16.2% in 2010. Yet the 3014 inventions by female-majority teams in 2010 are still outnumbered by the 3347 patents invented by men nearly four decades earlier, in 1976. In total, male-majority teams generated 373,774 patents, whereas female-majority teams generated 56,286.

Fig. 1 Total number of U.S. biomedical patents over time along with the number of patents with majority female (≥ 50% women) and majority male (> 50% men) inventor teams.

The figure includes 430,060 patents from 1976 through 2010.

Trends in the sex focus of invention for male-majority teams are shown in Fig. 2A and those of female-majority teams in Fig. 2B, with the black solid line and gray dashed line showing the percentage of patents that are female-focused and male-focused, respectively. Male-majority teams invented more for men than for women in all but 1 year of our data (Fig. 2A), although the difference has shrunk. In 1976, patents by male-majority teams were 15% more male-focused (11.2%) than female-focused (9.7%); in 2010, patents by male-majority teams were 6.2% more male-focused (13.7%) than female-focused (12.9%). This narrowing follows efforts by the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation starting in the late 1980s to promote research on women’s health (22). Overall, of the 373,774 patents invented by male-majority teams, 49,886 (13.3%) were male-focused, 46,453 (12.4%) were female-focused, and the rest were tagged as not sex-focused.

Fig. 2 Percentage of U.S. biomedical patents that are male-focused and female-focused broken out by the gender composition of the inventor team.

(A) The percentages for patents with majority-male teams (>50% men). (B) The percentages for patents with majority-female teams (≥50% women).

Female-majority teams are substantially more likely to invent for women and only slightly less likely to invent for men than are male-majority teams (Fig. 2B). In 1976, patents by female-majority teams were 7% more male-focused (12 versus 11.2%) and 37% were more female-focused (13.3 versus 9.7%) than patents by men. As with male-majority teams, by 2010, female-majority teams invented more often for both sexes. On average, of the 56,286 patents invented by female-majority teams, 8246 (14.7%) were female-focused, 7053 (12.5%) were male-focused, and the rest were not tagged as sex-focused. Compared with male-majority teams, female-majority teams are only 6% (12.5 versus 13.3%) less likely to invent for men but are 18.5% (14.7 versus12.4%) more likely to invent for women.

The inventor gender gap amplifies these invention sex gaps (Fig. 3). The number of female-focused minus male-focused patents invented by male-majority teams over time is shown in Fig. 3A. Such teams regularly invent more than 100 additional male-focused inventions per year. The same difference for female-majority teams is shown in Fig. 3B. Male and female inventors seem to have offsetting tendencies, but because there have been so many more male inventors, in aggregate invention has been skewed toward men’s health (Fig. 3C). The rising share of female inventors, and their increased focus on the needs of women, has begun to close and in some years flip the invention sex gap.

Fig. 3 The number of female-focused patents minus male-focused patents over time.

(A) The gap for patents with male-majority inventor teams (>50% men). (B) The gap for patents with female-majority teams (≥50% women). (C) The gap when including both types of teams.

To further explore the magnitude and consequences of this female inventor-invention link, we turned to patent-level models that regress a patent’s female focus on whether the invention team falls into one of four buckets: all female, majority (50% or more) but not all female, minority female, and all male (our excluded baseline). Our model includes fixed effects for the year interacted with the patent’s subcategory (drugs, surgery and instruments, biotechnology, or other) and the patent team’s size (23). Additional details and tables are provided in supplementary text S5. The estimates from this model, shown in black in Fig. 4A, show a clear dose-response relationship, increasing from 1.3 ± 0.16 (±SE) (P < 0.001) percentage points for minority-female teams to 2.4 ± 0.19 (P < 0.001) for majority-female teams, and to 4.6 ± 0.30 (P < 0.001) for all-female teams. These reflect relative increases of 10, 18, and 35% over the baseline female-focused invention rate of all-male teams.

Fig. 4 The increased chance, in percentage points, that a female-invented patent or research article is female-focused, compared with a patent or article from an all-male invention team.

The bars show robust 95 and 99% confidence intervals. (A) Estimates using the patent data. Black estimates come from a model fit by using OLS with year × subcategory and year × team size fixed effects. The gray estimates are from models that match teams with female inventors to all-male teams by using the patent’s year, subcategory, team size, and disease focus. The full sample includes 430,060 patents; the largest matched sample includes 45,751 patents. (B) Estimates using the research article data. Black estimates are from models fit by using OLS with year × journal and year × team size fixed effects. The gray estimates are similar but also match teams with female scientists to all-male teams by using the article’s year, team size, and disease focus. The full sample includes 2,062,695 articles published in the 1000 journals in PubMed with the highest commercialization impact factors from 2002 through 2020; the largest matched sample includes 119,650 papers.

These estimates are the result of two possible pathways. First, women might work in more female-focused research areas. Second, women might draw on different experiences and knowledge, regardless of their research area. If the first pathway is the main one, then the benefit to women of there being more female inventors will be concentrated in areas that are already female-focused (for example, additional pre-eclampsia treatments). If the second pathway matters more, then women would also see benefits in research areas without a strong prior sex focus (for example, female-focused atrial fibrillation treatments).

To isolate the within-research-area mechanism, we matched female-invented patents to male-invented patents using the patent’s publication year, subcategory, team size, and the narrow MeSH level-four disease area most associated with the invention [for example, 1983 drug patents for atrial flutter (C14.280.067.248) with two inventors, or 1990 surgery patents for atrial fibrillation (C14.280.067.198) with three inventors]. The estimates in Fig. 4A in gray come from this matched sample, which is roughly 1/10th the size of our full sample and includes year × subcategory × team size × disease fixed effects. After tightly matching within research areas, just over half of the total effect remains, with effect sizes for minority, majority, and all-female teams of 0.67 ± 0.37 (P = 0.36), 1.3 ± 0.37 (P = 0.002), and 2.8 ± 0.55 (P < 0.001) percentage points, respectively. The female inventor-invention link stems equally from women working in female-focused research areas and from women spotting opportunities in other research areas.

In the supplementary materials, we report additional analyses. In supplementary text S6, we show that inventions by women are not merely more sex-focused in general, which could be so if women work in applied areas in which anatomical sex differences are more central or if women are more likely to run sex and gender analyses (24). Instead, and consistent with Fig. 2, we found that teams with female inventors, as compared with all-male inventor teams, are neither more nor less likely to invent for men. Robustness checks are provided in supplementary text S7, including analyses showing that patents with all-female teams target diseases that affect 16% more women and are roughly 40% more likely to describe an invention that would be evaluated by a clinical trial that only enrolls women. Our within-disease-area findings hold if we instead rely on different matching criteria, multidimensional disease fixed effects, or lasso-style machine-learning methods (supplementary text S8), all of which further account for differences in which areas women and men invent.

In supplementary text S9, we show our exploration into heterogeneity in the female inventor-invention link. We found little evidence that the female inventor-invention link has consistently increased or decreased with time. We found suggestive evidence that all-female teams are 2.4 percentage points more likely to invent for women in noncorporate than in corporate settings, which is consistent with the idea that limited women’s representation in corporate management leads firms to overlook female-focused research and development opportunities (25). We also show that all-female teams are 8.7 percentage points more likely to invent for women in the surgery subcategory, versus 2.3 percentage points in drugs. This last difference is consistent with the idea that the historical hostility toward women in surgery (26) has both involved men dismissing promising female-focused surgical ideas and women being especially likely to develop those ideas.

Overall, we found that women’s biomedical inventions are more likely than men’s inventions to focus on women’s needs. That said, patents are a downstream outcome in the process of discovery and invention. Perhaps nascent female inventors discover ideas for both sexes equally, but gender stereotypes lead women to not patent their male-focused ideas (or men to not patent their female-focused ones). Differential selection into patenting, not differences in the knowledge and experiences that women bring to the discovery process, might be responsible.

To test for differential selection, we used data on the upstream research ideas that biomedical patents build on. Specifically, we analyzed 2,062,695 original biomedical research articles from the National Library of Medicine’s PubMed database that are at risk of being commercialized and were published between 2002 (the first year we have data on the authors’ gender) and 2020 (supplementary text S10). We again used the MeSH ontology’s “Male” and “Female” check tags to asses articles’ sex focus, but we did not use the MTI algorithm because articles in PubMed are assigned MeSH tags by human medical indexers.

Research teams with more women are more likely to discover for women (Fig. 4, A and B). There is again a clear dose-response relationship, with the effect increasing from 0.84 ± 0.08 (P < 0.001) to 3 ± 0.08 (P < 0.001) to 4.5 ± 0.12 (P < 0.001) percentage points for minority, majority, and all-female teams, respectively. As in Fig. 4A, the gray estimates in Fig. 4B involve matching and fixed effects to account for differences in men’s and women’s publishing rates in different narrow disease areas (supplementary text S11). Although the coefficients shrink, the differences are small and nonsignificant. Compared with the baseline female-focused publication rate, papers with all-female teams are about 12% more likely to focus on the health needs of women. Additional robustness tests are reported in supplementary text S12, including analyses that show that discoveries by women are not more likely to be male-focused, that our findings hold under alternative matching schemes, and that discoveries by all-female teams target diseases that affect 47% more women and are >40% more likely to describe an idea that would be evaluated by a clinical trial that enrolls only women.

These findings imply that many promising female-focused discoveries have yet to be commercialized because women are less likely to obtain patents (1, 27). Rough calculations (supplementary text S13) suggest that if all the patents invented between 1976 and 2010 had been produced by men and women equally, then there would have been around 6500 more female-focused inventions. Even when we focused within research areas, thus holding constant the number of patents produced across areas, we still found that inventor gender equality would have resulted in just over 3500 more female-focused inventions. If research articles were produced equally by men and women, then from 2002 to 2020 there would have potentially been 40,000 more female-focused discoveries. This suggests that there may still be many untapped market opportunities to invent for women—opportunities that could in turn improve women’s health.

These estimates of the number of lost female inventions are suggestive. The primary goal of this study is to establish a link between the background of inventors and who might benefit from their inventions. We did not observe the counterfactual world in which there are more (or fewer) female inventors or scientists. Hence, the evidence presented here cannot tell us whether women’s female-focused inventions could have instead been invented by all-male teams, or the extent to which female inventors might displace men from working on women’s health, or whether women might instead pursue other, non–female-focused ideas if there were a greater share of female inventors and inventions. Our analyses also cannot tell us whether the gender mix of inventions is or ever has been socially optimal. Last, although recent work has found that demographic similarity between doctors and patients improves female and African American health outcomes (19, 28, 29), our analysis does not shed light on whether female-invented and -focused patents are more original or impactful. We see each of these limitations of the present study as a promising avenue for more research.

That research should not be limited to the differences between men and women nor to biomedicine. Our findings sketch a road map for future research on demographics and innovation. Reducing the barriers that disadvantaged groups face when working and inventing has accounted for a nontrivial share of economic growth over the past century (30). In virtually all cases, though, whether the population under study has been 19th-century Black inventors (31), early-20th-century Eastern European scientists (32), or some other group, the focus has been on how discrimination has reduced the overall level of innovation. By contrast, we found a robust and sizable connection between inventor gender and the sex focus of inventions. This is one step in showing how labor-market bias might spill over into product-market bias. Whereas earlier work on gender and innovation has focused on estimating biases against entrepreneurs and inventors while holding the underlying idea constant [for example, (33)], we hope that future work will focus on understanding bias against ideas that especially benefit historically disadvantaged groups (34). Our findings here suggest that inequities in who invents may lead to inequities in who benefits from invention.

References and Notes

  1. S. Kahn, D. Ginther, “Women and STEM,” technical report 23525, National Bureau of Economic Research, June 2017.

  2. J. Milli, E. Williams-Baron, M. Berlan, J. Xia, B. Gault, “Equity in innovation: Women inventors and patents,” an Institute for Women’s Policy Research Report (Institute for Women’s Policy Research, 2016).

  3. M. Dusenbery, Doing Harm: The Truth about How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick (HarperOne, 2018).

  4. C. C. Perez, Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men (Abrams Press, 2019).

  5. Office of Research on Women’s Health, “Report of the advisory committee on research on women’s health,” Technical report, NIH publication no. 17 OD 7995 (National Institutes of Health, 2016).

  6. K. Hafner, A breast cancer surgeon who keeps challenging the status quo. New York Times, 30 September 2015.

  7. L. Schiebinger, editor, Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering (Stanford Univ. Press, 2008).

  8. K. Frances, Conley. Walking Out on the Boys (Macmillan, 1999).

  9. D. Lisa, Cook. Violence and economic activity: Evidence from African American patents, 1870–1940. J. Econom. Growth 19, 221–257 (2014).

  10. P. Moser, S. San, “Immigration, science, and invention. Evidence from the quota acts,” technical report, working paper (2020).

  11. D. Demner-Fushman, J. Mork, “Nlm medical text indexer: Report to the Board of Scientific Counselors of the U.S. National Library of Medicine” (Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, 2016).

  12. A. R. Rae, J. G. Mork, D. Demner-Fushman, Convolutional neural network for automatic MeSH indexing, in Joint European Conference on Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery in Databases (Springer, 2019), pp. 581–594.

Acknowledgments: J. Comeau, A. Fernandez, H. Ham, J. Kim, Y. Zhou, S. Neumeyer, and E. Vachlas provided invaluable research assistance. We thank audiences at the AEA, Barcelona GSE, BAIC, MIT, HBS, IESE, KU Leuven, Madrid Work and Occupations, and Queen’s University along with C. Cunningham, W. Ding, K. Ferreira, D. Gross, S. Hasan, J. Krieger, M. Marx, K. Myers, R. Nanda, D. Spar, and A. Stern for helpful feedback and suggestions. Funding: This project has received funding from Harvard Business School and also from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement 799330. Author contributions: All authors contributed equally to this work. Competing interests: The authors have no known competing interests. Data and materials availability: All data and code are available in the Harvard Dataverse at https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/V8NJUV (35).

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Philippines increases ceiling for health professionals going abroad https://jasonpowers.org/philippines-increases-ceiling-for-health-professionals-going-abroad/ https://jasonpowers.org/philippines-increases-ceiling-for-health-professionals-going-abroad/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 10:24:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/philippines-increases-ceiling-for-health-professionals-going-abroad/ Filipino workers, including nurses applying to work in the UK, attend a conference at a review center for the International English Language Testing System or IELTS in Manila, the Philippines on April 2, 2019. Photo taken on 2 April 2019. REUTERS / Eloisa Lopez / File photo MANILA, June 18 (Reuters) – The Philippines has […]]]>

Filipino workers, including nurses applying to work in the UK, attend a conference at a review center for the International English Language Testing System or IELTS in Manila, the Philippines on April 2, 2019. Photo taken on 2 April 2019. REUTERS / Eloisa Lopez / File photo

MANILA, June 18 (Reuters) – The Philippines has increased the number of nurses and health workers allowed to travel abroad to 6,500 per year, a senior official said on Friday, amid high demand for its healthcare professionals.

The Philippines, one of the world’s largest sources of nurses, hit their annual cap of 5,000 health worker deployments late last month.

Those with contracts as of May 31 can take up jobs overseas, President Harry Roque’s spokesman said in a statement. This means that 1,500 more nurses and health workers can work abroad, according to the Ministry of Labor.

The labor minister said on Wednesday he would seek approval to allow the deployment of 5,000 additional healthcare workers overseas, but a group of nurses said there were many more in the hope to find better paying jobs abroad.

Health workers under government-to-government labor agreements, such as the one with the UK, are exempt from the new cap.

About 17,000 Filipino nurses signed overseas employment contracts in 2019, but the Philippines temporarily ended them in 2020, to consolidate their health sector as coronavirus hospitalizations rose sharply.

Philippine Nurses United general secretary Jocelyn Andamo said the extra 1,500 was frustrating.

“It is very unrealistic compared to the enormous need for nurses,” she said.

Reporting by Neil Jerome Morales; Editing by Martin Petty

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Retired Frisbie Hospital CEO is proud of his daughters’ healthcare careers https://jasonpowers.org/retired-frisbie-hospital-ceo-is-proud-of-his-daughters-healthcare-careers/ https://jasonpowers.org/retired-frisbie-hospital-ceo-is-proud-of-his-daughters-healthcare-careers/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 09:07:25 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/retired-frisbie-hospital-ceo-is-proud-of-his-daughters-healthcare-careers/ Jeff Scionti, outgoing CEO of Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, is a proud father of two daughters, both following in his footsteps with careers in healthcare. Anna Scionti and Kathryn Burnham both work at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. Both credit their father for helping to inspire their careers. Burnham is PRH’s Principal Ultrasound Technologist and Anna […]]]>

Jeff Scionti, outgoing CEO of Frisbie Memorial Hospital in Rochester, is a proud father of two daughters, both following in his footsteps with careers in healthcare.

Anna Scionti and Kathryn Burnham both work at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. Both credit their father for helping to inspire their careers. Burnham is PRH’s Principal Ultrasound Technologist and Anna Scionti is a Registered Nurse in the Behavioral Health Unit at Portsmouth Regional Hospital.

Prior to Frisbie, Scionti worked at Parkland Medical Center, an HCA hospital in Derry, having started his HCA New Hampshire career nearly 35 years ago. He retires on June 18, having successfully led the Frisbie Memorial Hospital team through the transition from a self-contained community hospital to a membership in the HCA health system in New Hampshire.

“It’s quite special that my two daughters work in a hospital that I have been involved in for most of my life,” said Scionti. “Both started in Parkland, where I also worked. “

Scionti said he was 35 with HCA (Hospital Corporation of America), but 40 in healthcare.

“I started as an army lab technician,” he said. “I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, but I was interested in working locally. I worked in a hospital while I was on the reserve. about health care is that there are so many opportunities, so many places to go. A position has opened for a financial analyst. I had a master’s degree in commerce, so I went for it.

Jeff Scionti, CEO of Frisbie Memorial Hospital, is retiring after a long career with HCA Healthcare.

Scionti became CEO of Parkland in 2016 and continued in this role until 2020, serving 33 years at Parkland. When HCA asked him to take the lead in Frisbie’s transition to an HCA hospital, he said he welcomed the challenge.

Covid19 pandemic:HCA New Hampshire Establishes Hotline to Help New Unemployed Get Health Insurance Coverage

“The ability to lead a hospital through changes like this is a once in a lifetime opportunity,” he said. “I welcomed it as my final transition.”

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Health Care and Employment Alert: OSHA Temporary Emergency Standard for Healthcare Employers and COVID-19 Guidelines for Non-Healthcare Employers https://jasonpowers.org/health-care-and-employment-alert-osha-temporary-emergency-standard-for-healthcare-employers-and-covid-19-guidelines-for-non-healthcare-employers/ https://jasonpowers.org/health-care-and-employment-alert-osha-temporary-emergency-standard-for-healthcare-employers-and-covid-19-guidelines-for-non-healthcare-employers/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 06:27:12 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/health-care-and-employment-alert-osha-temporary-emergency-standard-for-healthcare-employers-and-covid-19-guidelines-for-non-healthcare-employers/ As expected, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is becoming increasingly active on the COVID-19 front. On June 10, 2021, OSHA announced the publication of a Temporary Emergency Standard (STE) to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19. The ETS will be effective immediately upon publication in the Federal Register, which is expected to happen imminently. […]]]>

As expected, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is becoming increasingly active on the COVID-19 front. On June 10, 2021, OSHA announced the publication of a Temporary Emergency Standard (STE) to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19. The ETS will be effective immediately upon publication in the Federal Register, which is expected to happen imminently. In addition to the ETS, OSHA has published guidance for all other employers on mitigating and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace, particularly with respect to unvaccinated and at-risk employees.

Temporary emergency standard for healthcare workers

According to the OSHA press release, the ETS “aims to protect workers facing the highest coronavirus risks – those who work in healthcare facilities where patients with suspected or confirmed coronavirus are being treated. This includes employees of hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities; emergency responders; home health workers; and employees in ambulatory care facilities where patients with suspected or confirmed coronavirus are treated. Like virtually all OSHA standards, the ETS uses a tiered approach to protect workers covered by the standard, which includes requiring employers to:

  • Develop and implement a written COVID-19 plan that includes a designated safety coordinator responsible for ensuring compliance;
  • Implement patient screening and management that includes limiting and monitoring entry points into settings where direct care is provided and screening of patients, visitors and non-employees;
  • Provide and ensure the use of personal protective equipment as needed;
  • Limit the number of employees exposed to procedures generating aerosols on people suspected / confirmed of COVID-19;
  • Create physical distancing and barriers;
  • Clean and disinfect areas;
  • Provide training to employees on the transmission of COVID-19, the tasks and situations in the workplace that could lead to infection, as well as the relevant policies and procedures; and
  • Ensure that employer-owned HVAC systems are operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and design specifications and that the air filters have a Minimum Efficiency Ratio (MERV) value of 13 or higher if the system requires it. allows.

Notably, the ETS exempts fully vaccinated workers from masking, distancing and barrier requirements in well-defined areas where there is no reasonable expectation that a person suspected or confirmed of COVID-19 will be present.

Employers must comply with all provisions of the ETS within 14 days of publication of the ETS in the Federal Register, except for requirements regarding physical barriers, ventilation, and employee training. Employers must comply with these provisions within 30 days of the ETS’s publication in the Federal Register.

The ETS is very detailed and many requirements are not covered in this article. However, OSHA has published a fact sheet summarizing the ETS and FAQs, which are linked below. These are very informative and will help employers to comply with the ETS.

OSHA Guidelines for the Protection of Unvaccinated or at-Risk Workers

At the same time as OSHA released the ETS for Healthcare Workers, it also released guidelines for employers in the form of recommendations to be used to protect unvaccinated or otherwise at-risk workers, such as workers who have had a transplant, as well as employees who have had the use of steroids or other drugs that suppress the immune system. The employer’s recommendations include:

  • Offer paid time off to employees to get vaccinated;
  • Teach infected, unvaccinated workers who have been in close contact with an infected person and all other symptomatic workers to stay home;
  • Implement physical distancing strategies for unvaccinated or at-risk employees in all common areas;
  • Provide face covers / masks for all unvaccinated or at risk employees;
  • Train employees on your COVID-19 policies and procedures;
  • Maintenance of ventilation systems; and
  • Perform routine cleaning and disinfection.

OSHA’s guidelines for unvaccinated and at-risk workers are quite consistent with CDC guidelines on the same subject.

In conclusion, it is essential that healthcare providers become familiar with ETS and take action now to comply with its requirements. One would expect OSHA to focus its resources on law enforcement in this area. As workers continue to return to work, employers outside of healthcare should continue to implement strategies that protect unvaccinated or at-risk employees.

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Brewers vs. Rockies – Match Recap – June 17th, 2021 https://jasonpowers.org/brewers-vs-rockies-match-recap-june-17th-2021/ https://jasonpowers.org/brewers-vs-rockies-match-recap-june-17th-2021/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 05:03:25 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/brewers-vs-rockies-match-recap-june-17th-2021/ DENVER – – Germán Márquez allowed a six-innings scoreless hit, CJ Cron ignited a five-point first with a grand slam and the Colorado Rockies beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-3 on Thursday night for their fourth straight victory . Garrett Hampson followed Cron’s slam with a homerun, and Raimel Tapia extended his career-best 14-game hitting streak […]]]>

DENVER – – Germán Márquez allowed a six-innings scoreless hit, CJ Cron ignited a five-point first with a grand slam and the Colorado Rockies beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-3 on Thursday night for their fourth straight victory .

Garrett Hampson followed Cron’s slam with a homerun, and Raimel Tapia extended his career-best 14-game hitting streak with an RBI single in the sixth. “It was a great four games,” said Cron. “After this trip (1-5) on the road, we had to come back here in force. There is something about this stadium that we feel very comfortable in and it’s nice to see the offense roll with everyone’s contribution. We’re scoring a lot and our pitchers are doing a great job.

Milwaukee made four mistakes, one of which led to an unearned run in the sixth, and lost their fourth in a row.

“It certainly wasn’t a defensive enough game,” said manager Craig Counsell.

Christian Yelich beat a single in the infield leading the fourth for the lone hit against Marquez (5-6). Luis Urias netted a three-point brace in the seventh against Yency Almonte, who relieved Ben Bowden after hitting three walks to charge the goals.

Marquez had to deal with a lot of traffic on the bases after stepping three times and throwing a pair of wild throws, including one that rolled into the safety net on a third strike that gave Jackie Bradley Jr. reach the fifth round. But a Colorado defense that made three mistakes also made three double plays to help Marquez dodge the damage. “Honestly, he wasn’t really sharp,” Rockies manager Bud Black said. “His fastball drive was spotty. He couldn’t really locate the fastball. The shattering ball improved as the match progressed. But he threw enough quality shots to record the outs and he got some double balls that helped him. But I saw it better, honestly. One hit, three walks in six innings, you’d think I would congratulate him, but I have high expectations for him. I have high expectations for all of our guys. “

Brandon Woodruff (5-3) played five innings and allowed five hits and five runs, all in the first.

Yonathan Daza and Trevor Story went their separate ways and Ryan McMahon walked to charge the goals before Cron drove a 1-1 pitch into the right-field seats for his third career slam. Hampson followed with a home run that climbed into the left-field bleachers. “He pitched Cron who unfortunately came out over the plate, which he got up in the air,” said Counsell. “He hit pretty well. (Woodruff) was pretty good after that. He went through the next three innings. We made a few defensive mistakes in the fifth but we got through it. This is just a case where a bad round got us. OVERVOLTAGE

Cron has had three homers in four games since Monday, breaking a 21-game homeless streak that was the fourth longest in his career.

“I don’t think I hit as many home runs or driven the ball as much as needed to be in the middle of the order. So having a few here on the homestand has been nice, ”Cron said. “It felt good. Happy to contribute.

TRAINERS ‘ROOM

Brewers: 2B Kolten Wong participated in a full range of pre-game baseball activities. Barring a setback, he could soon be reinstated on the injured list – possibly this weekend. “We are close,” Counsell said. Wong, the Brewers’ first hitter and two-time Gold Glove winner with St. Louis, went to the IL on June 4 with a left oblique strain.

Rockies: RHP Mychal Givens has been placed on the 10-day injured list with a lower back injury, and RHP Justin Lawrence has been recalled from Triple-A Albuquerque to fill the position. Black said Givens, a mainstay in the bullpen, had suffered from back pain for some time. “It had gotten to the point where it was getting painful, and the medical team and Mychal felt that the best thing to do was probably put him on IL, calm him down, and when he comes back, he won’t. there will be no problem, ”Black explained.

FOLLOWING

Brewers: RHP Corbin Burnes (3-4, 2.27 ERA) is set to make his career debut on Friday night at Coors Field. He’s gone 1-1 with a 9.00 ERA in four previous stadium appearances, all in relief.

Rockies: RHP Antonio Senzatela (2-7, 4.86 ERA) is set to make his fourth career start against Milwaukee, but the first since September 27, 2019. He is 1-0 with a 2 ERA , 40 against the Brewers.

——

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Regional partnership supporting career paths in health https://jasonpowers.org/regional-partnership-supporting-career-paths-in-health/ https://jasonpowers.org/regional-partnership-supporting-career-paths-in-health/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 02:50:15 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/regional-partnership-supporting-career-paths-in-health/ First VIC The Government of Victoria is supporting local collaboration between health services and educators in central Victoria to increase the health workforce and meet the future health needs of the region. Regional Development Minister Mary-Anne Thomas was in Bendigo today to launch the Loddon Campaspe Health Sector Roadmap and Skills Development – a new […]]]>

First VIC

The Government of Victoria is supporting local collaboration between health services and educators in central Victoria to increase the health workforce and meet the future health needs of the region.

Regional Development Minister Mary-Anne Thomas was in Bendigo today to launch the Loddon Campaspe Health Sector Roadmap and Skills Development – a new plan to help manage future demands on health personnel in the region.

The roadmap will foster closer links between industry, educators and training providers, and identify clear pathways for students and volunteers to qualification in areas such as nursing, allied health, Aboriginal health care and care for the elderly and disabled.

The healthcare sector is a vital and growing area of ​​economic activity for central Victoria and is the largest local employer, representing approximately 17,300 workers in the Loddon Campaspe area.

The roadmap foresees a significant increase in the aging of the population over the next 15 years, which will place additional demands on the healthcare sector and shift in demand healthcare skills from acute to chronic.

The roadmap highlights the importance of encouraging new and young workers in the sector to respond to local skills demands.

The recommendations are drawn from extensive engagement with students, educators, trainers, current employees, and industry professionals.

It was developed after the Loddon Campaspe Regional Partnership identified the growing need for skilled local workers in the sector and was made possible with funding from the Loddon Mallee Regional Development Australia Committee.

The Loddon Campaspe regional partnership will continue to work closely with industry, education and training players to activate the pathways roadmap over the coming months. To read the visit report rdv.vic.gov.au.

As stated by Regional Development Minister Mary-Anne Thomas

“I salute the obvious local collaboration in this work, which is helping the Victoria center shape its future and meet the needs of its growing healthcare sector.”

As stated by Bendigo East MP Jacinta Allan

“This roadmap shows how industry and education can work together more closely to provide students and young people with a real world experience and clear pathways to the healthcare sector.”

As stated by Bendigo West MP Maree Edwards

“If the past year has shown us anything, it’s how much we rely on the work of our amazing health workers and the important work they do every day.

As reported by Loddon Campaspe Regional Partnership Chairman David Richardson

“A broad consultation identified a need to improve our health education and training pathways.

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View full here.

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Attract Your Desires With Healing Stones https://jasonpowers.org/attract-your-desires-with-healing-stones/ https://jasonpowers.org/attract-your-desires-with-healing-stones/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 00:19:24 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/attract-your-desires-with-healing-stones/ To some, the law of attraction sounds too good to be true. For others, manifesting their dreams and desires through this “law” is a way of life. Some say that by harnessing this so-called universal power through the art of manifestation, almost anything is possible. There are even specific strategies, including using crystals, that can […]]]>

To some, the law of attraction sounds too good to be true. For others, manifesting their dreams and desires through this “law” is a way of life.

Some say that by harnessing this so-called universal power through the art of manifestation, almost anything is possible. There are even specific strategies, including using crystals, that can help make this happen.

Although there is no scientific evidence to support it, there are still many believers. Read on to find out what proponents are saying about using crystals to manifest the life you want.

First of all, what exactly is manifesting?

Simply put, it is the process of achieving your desires using the law of attraction.

“The basic and most widely understood premise of the Law of Attraction is that thoughts become things, and what we focus on we see more of in our reality,” says Law’s Spiritual Coach and Mentor of attraction. Esther mccann.

Demonstrating is also something we do unconsciously. Believers say that we manifest our realities all the time with our expectations, thoughts, and feelings.

“The law of attraction can be harnessed by developing an awareness of those thoughts, feelings and beliefs that we have and how they affect the way we energetically present ourselves in this world,” says McCann.

Emma Halley, crystal therapist and coach in spiritual well-being, explains that the law of attraction is based on energetic principles.

“We know that everything in the universe is made of energy on a subatomic particle level, and our thoughts carry their own vibration,” she says. “When we consider that ‘like attracts like,’ the things we think about and focus on become part of the vibration that we ourselves carry, and therefore attract.”

Basically, manifesting means coming into vibrational alignment with your desires.

“The key to manifestation is to create a state of mind that carries the same vibrational frequency as the life we ​​want to live,” says Halley.

Some people use crystals to match this vibrational frequency.

While the Law of Attraction is practiced by people all over the world, it is not without its detractors.

Some dismiss it as wishful thinking, others as complete nonsense. So what does science say?

Some research supports the idea that positive thinking can lead to a happier life. A Research report 2005 with over 275,000 participants, it was found that people with “positive affect” were more likely to experience increased levels of success in health, work and relationships.

A Research report 2010 found that visualizing your desires as if they had been fulfilled, a popular manifestation practice, improved the likelihood of that desire becoming a reality.

Meanwhile, a 2016 study discovered that positive visualizations have the power to reduce anxiety and improve feelings of happiness.

It is important to note that there is no evidence that conclusively proves the existence of the law of attraction.

However, for the record, a growing number of people are crediting the Law of Attraction for helping them manifest everything from increased levels of wealth and material items to better health, new opportunities and all. the rest.

So how can crystals help you get into vibrational alignment with the things you want?

Whether it’s attracting your soul mate, receiving more money, or improving your health, believers say there is a crystal for it.

Crystals are said to carry powerful energies that can be harnessed to influence the energy around and within us. Some believe it can help with the manifestation process.

“Crystals are super powerful little life forces that grow organically, much like plants, animals, and humans,” says Halley. “They carry an electric charge throughout the crystal structure known as piezoelectricity. “

Halley believes that piezoelectricity, defined as an electrical polarization caused by mechanical stress, influences the vibration of the crystal as well as the user at an energetic level.

Although research on healing crystals is lacking, Halley suggests keeping an open mind.

“A lot of people believe crystal therapy is a placebo. I would like to think that after 20 years in the business, I can say with some certainty that it is much more than that,” she said. If it improves a person’s quality of life, then why reject it because we can’t fully explain or understand it yet? ”

Although current science does not confirm it, there is nothing wrong with trying crystalline manifestation, especially if you keep your expectations realistic.

There are many different crystals that can help you manifest certain things in different areas of your life, according to crystal advocates.

Money and success

  • Pyrite: believed to attract abundance and stimulate feelings of motivation in business and career
  • Citrine: a popular crystal for wealth and success, nurturing creativity, inspiring ideas to generate money
  • Green Aventurine: known as the Stone of Opportunity, believed to attract lucrative opportunities aligned

Love

  • Rose quartz: one of the most popular crystals for attracting love and stimulating feelings of self-esteem
  • Pink Kunzite: strengthens unconditional love and romantic communication
  • Rhodonite: attracts love by healing emotional wounds like grief

Health

  • Obsidian: helps dissolve blockages in your body, increasing energy flow and flow
  • Quartz: known as the “master healer”, brings an optimal vibratory state for healing
  • Amethyst: soothing, calming and healing for stress, tension and fear

Dreams and desires

  • Celestite: can help you connect with the divine and remember your dreams, which can be helpful for emotional processing, according to McCann.
  • Iron pyrite: removes feelings of inadequacy that can keep you from achieving your dreams, says Halley.
  • Clear Quartz: can help you clarify what you want and is believed to raise your vibration to match your desires.

Here are some common ways to use crystals to manifest:

  • definition of intention
  • wear them
  • place them in your home or environment
  • meditate with them
  • use them in rituals

Define an intention

Defining an intention for your crystal essentially means giving it a purpose. To do this, write down your intention or say it out loud.

When setting an intention, Halley advises placing the crystal in your hand and focusing on your intention as if it has already happened.

Carry Them

Many people like to wear crystals as jewelry or keep them on them throughout the day. The most popular crystals can be purchased as pendants, or you can put one in your pocket to keep them safe.

Keep them in your environment

If you don’t want to wear your crystals, you can place them in your home. McCann and Halley are both fans.

McCann suggests placing crystals in areas that correlate with your goal.

“For example, pyrite and citrine could be placed in the office where one makes money. Or they can be carried in a bag or placed under a pillow at night, ”she says.

Meditate with them

Combining crystals with meditation can amplify your manifestation abilities.

McCann says it’s because meditation allows you to calm resistant thoughts that can keep you from manifesting. She also believes that meditation can help you receive divine guidance on how to move forward.

“Crystals can be used as a focal point for people practicing mindfulness meditation,” she says. “What we energetically release allows us to make room for new manifestations to flow into our experience.”

Don’t forget to clean your crystals

Cleaning your crystals removes stagnant or unwanted energies and should be done regularly to maintain their purity.

To cleanse your crystals:

  • put in a bowl of salt
  • run under fresh water
  • use sound healing tools like singing bowls
  • place in the sun or moonlight
  • smear with frankincense, sage or palo santo

Before putting your crystal in the water, check the type on Mohs hardness scale to make sure it won’t dissolve.

Halley says that not only do you have to be careful not to waste counterfeit money when purchasing crystals, but it’s also important to be aware of overuse.

“Crystals come from the earth, where they can take thousands of years to develop. There is only a limited supply, ”she said.

When combined with the Law of Attraction, many people believe that crystals can be used to manifest our dreams and desires faster. It is thanks to their so-called vibrational energies.

Of course, not everyone believes in the power of crystals or the law of attraction, and no scientific research can prove they work.

However, some say that doesn’t mean you should reject them.

“I like to remind myself that there is magic in everything and we don’t need to know all the answers,” says Halley.

Whatever your opinion of the manifestation with crystals, there is no harm in trying it for yourself.


Victoria Stokes is a writer from the United Kingdom. When not writing about her favorite topics, personal development and well-being, she usually has her nose in a good book. Victoria lists coffee, cocktails, and the color pink among some of her favorite things. Find it on Instagram.

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Mental health, not score, defines success for Matt Wolff https://jasonpowers.org/mental-health-not-score-defines-success-for-matt-wolff/ https://jasonpowers.org/mental-health-not-score-defines-success-for-matt-wolff/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 00:14:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/mental-health-not-score-defines-success-for-matt-wolff/ SAN DIEGO – In many ways, Matthew Wolff’s first round of the US Open reflected his brief but turbulent career. He started strong – 3 under par on four holes and leading – just like he did on the PGA Tour, winning only his third start. Then came the tough luge, a bogey-double bogey-bogey race […]]]>

SAN DIEGO – In many ways, Matthew Wolff’s first round of the US Open reflected his brief but turbulent career.

He started strong – 3 under par on four holes and leading – just like he did on the PGA Tour, winning only his third start. Then came the tough luge, a bogey-double bogey-bogey race that rocked him, much like the last eight months with the WDs, a DQ at the Masters, no appearances at the Players and PGA Championship and a two-month hiatus at the middle of the year. season.

One can only hope that Wolff’s closing effort – four birdies that put him on the positive side of the ledger with a below par 70 – suggests his future trajectory.

“A lot of good, a lot of bad,” he said afterwards, a verdict as applicable to his year as to his time. “I fell back a bit and things weren’t always going well, but I’m still having fun, I’m having fun and I’m happy and in my opinion right now that’s kind of what I’m working on and the most important thing for me no matter how it goes there.

Wolff’s comments after his turn were more compelling and more important than any of the events recorded on the scoreboard here at Torrey Pines on Thursday. A popular and likeable young man opened a vein on the pressure that drove him to walk away from the PGA Tour, the crushing weight of expectations placed on young shoulders, the disorienting effect of always trying to please someone else.

He explained his recent absence with unfailing honesty.

“I didn’t want to go away. … Then when I finally started to get into a pretty bad situation, honestly I was like, you know what, I need some time, ”he said. “The most important thing right now that I’m trying to do is have fun again and really take care of myself. I mean, I love these fans and I want to play well for them, but right now I’m really trying to be happy and like I said I’m living a great life and I want to enjoy it.

Wolff has many attributes that superficial cynics might point to as evidence that he doesn’t have much to complain about. There are the $ 5.7 million in career earnings at age 22, the PGA Tour victory, the beauty of the movie star, the sublime talent. There is always an antipodes side.

Twenty-two is awfully young to have every working day judged success or failure based on a number on a map, awfully young to realize that there is nowhere where to hide and no way to bluff, terribly young to adjust to the fact that others are being paid to judge you, terribly young to understand that a good day today only increases expectations for tomorrow. Life on the PGA Tour is a lonely existence, even for the popular and upbeat guys. Relationships are harder to maintain and faster to break. And when a man focuses on that “total” box of the dashboard, his life can become more of that sum than of its parts.

Naomi Osaka is a year older than Wolff. Last month, she walked away from a shot at her fifth Grand Slam title, retiring from Roland Garros due to mental health issues. She will also jump Wimbledon later this month. His example of prioritizing mental health, of finding one’s own balance, did not go unnoticed by Wolff.

“I live an incredible life. So many millions and millions and millions of people would trade me in the blink of an eye, ”he said. “I needed to kind of come back and say, ‘Dude, you’re living an amazing life. You don’t always have to play well. I know I want to, I still want to play well, I still want to please the fans, but I kind of realized I just need to have fun and be happy.

US OPEN: Friday departure times | TV, streaming info | Notes

Perspective is a hard-won thing at 22. Wolff gives the impression of a young man determined to stabilize his ship, who understands that what others expect of him doesn’t have to determine what he expects of himself, and that he doesn’t have to do it alone, in silence.

Big Championship Thursdays are often focused on wellness stories, usually unfamiliar companions with the glamorous end of a leaderboard enjoying a moment. There is a fleetingness to these stories though, as if we implicitly know that what we applaud after the first round will not be there after the last round. Wolff’s 70 was the kind of roller coaster (only five pars) that didn’t lend itself to success at a US Open, but it got here without any expectations. In fact, he deliberately picked the toughest championship of all for his comeback.

“I guess if I shoot 78 there will be a lot of people doing that too, so it won’t stand out as much,” he said with a wry laugh.

His turn of 70 was encouraging, but Wolff knows this week’s success is measured by something more indelible than pencil stripes on a scorecard.

“I worked really hard to stay in the open space and focus on shooting in front of you and not shooting behind you. I’m probably going to struggle with that and learn to handle bad shots for the rest of my career, ”he said. “But I’m young and I’m learning and just trying to enjoy it.”

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LSU Shreveport Medical School Chancellor Resigns Day Day After Reinstatement | Education https://jasonpowers.org/lsu-shreveport-medical-school-chancellor-resigns-day-day-after-reinstatement-education/ https://jasonpowers.org/lsu-shreveport-medical-school-chancellor-resigns-day-day-after-reinstatement-education/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 20:36:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/lsu-shreveport-medical-school-chancellor-resigns-day-day-after-reinstatement-education/ LSU Health Shreveport Chancellor Dr Ghali E. Ghali announced Thursday afternoon that he would resign, in effect immediately, as director of Shreveport School of Medicine, just a day after being reinstated in his position. Ghali, who became chancellor in February 2016, wrote that he would return to work as a faculty member. “We have accepted […]]]>

LSU Health Shreveport Chancellor Dr Ghali E. Ghali announced Thursday afternoon that he would resign, in effect immediately, as director of Shreveport School of Medicine, just a day after being reinstated in his position.

Ghali, who became chancellor in February 2016, wrote that he would return to work as a faculty member.

“We have accepted Dr Ghali’s request, and Dr David Lewis, who has served as Acting Chancellor, will be Acting Chancellor while we conduct a search for the next Chancellor,” LSU President Tom Galligan said in a statement. e-mail to LSU Health Shreveport. employees.

Ghali was put on administrative leave for approximately two months following claims by doctors and staff at LSU Health Shreveport that he retaliated against them for raising allegations of sexual misconduct against key administrators of the Faculty of Medicine.

An investigation into the allegations, which has not been made public, has cleared Ghali of improper conduct, Ghali said in a statement Wednesday evening. LSU confirmed his statement and reinstated Ghali as chancellor on Wednesday.

Dr Ghali E. Ghali was reinstated by LSU on Wednesday evening as chancellor of the university’s medical school at Shreveport.

Galligan suspended Ghali as chancellor on April 12, but allowed the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to continue seeing patients.

Four women, including two doctors, from LSU Health Sciences Center Shreveport filed federal complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, claiming that Ghali had refused promotions and made working conditions difficult because ” they had tried to help at least 16 medical students report incidents of sexual misconduct, including touching, writing pornographic book reviews, asking students for wine, making derogatory comments about students’ appearances and take pictures of young women. The two longtime administrators appointed by the students retired prematurely and left the school. Five other women told similar stories but did not file a complaint with the EEOC.

The allegations came as LSU was attempting to respond to reports that former university leaders protected named coaches, athletes and administrators in sexual misconduct complaints raised by female students. Current leaders have emphasized “in the past” as they crafted new, expanded rules, disciplined staff still working at LSU, sacked the university’s long-standing law firm, and bolstered the office that would respond, respond and would investigate future incidents.

Twice a day, we’ll send you the headlines of the day. Register today.

Allison Jones, the Shreveport lawyer representing the four women, said: “Based on the evidence produced by my clients, it is highly doubtful that Dr. Ghali was completely cleared of all the allegations. His subsequent resignation as chancellor and chairman of his department only casts more doubt on the accuracy of Dr Ghali’s description of the investigation’s findings. The timing is certainly suspect.

Dr Ghali writes to President Galligan to step down as Chancellor of LSU Health Shreveport

When the LSU board of directors met to discuss Ghali’s allegations in April, four northern Louisiana lawmakers, including Rep. Larry Bagley, the Stonewall Republican who oversees much of LSU’s budget as as Chairman of the House Health and Welfare Committee, met with supervisors behind closed doors to express their support for Ghali.

In a letter to Galligan on Thursday, written on official stationery, Ghali reiterated his belief that he had been unfairly attacked.

“While the results of these investigations come as no surprise to me or my family, the attacks and unwarranted distractions we have had to endure over the past few months have taken a heavy toll on me and my loved ones and have brought to light several issues. “, he added. he wrote. “As a change agent, I had to make sure that the goals were set and that people were held accountable for achieving them. It didn’t always win everyone’s favor but was always done in the right way. best strategic interest of the university. “

Without having served as chancellor since April 12, when Galligan suspended him during the investigative process, Ghali wrote that he could spend more time with his family and with his patients.

“Every decision I have made as Chancellor over the past five plus years has been made in the best interests of my LSUHS family. This personal decision to quit is no different and in no way detracts from my love for LSUHS, its employees, staff, students and faculty, but rather puts my family’s needs first, ”Ghali wrote.

5 more women report harassment at LSU medical school in Shreveport and want supervisory board action

Five other women have come forward to speak out about unresolved sexual harassment complaints at LSU Shreveport School of Medicine, offering …

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Kaiser settles $ 1.4 million employment class lawsuit – Courthouse News Service https://jasonpowers.org/kaiser-settles-1-4-million-employment-class-lawsuit-courthouse-news-service/ https://jasonpowers.org/kaiser-settles-1-4-million-employment-class-lawsuit-courthouse-news-service/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 19:56:30 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/kaiser-settles-1-4-million-employment-class-lawsuit-courthouse-news-service/ Two former call center employees sued the healthcare giant, citing violations of federal and state payroll laws. A Kaiser Permanente building near its headquarters in Oakland, Calif. (Coolcaesar via Wikipedia) SAN DIEGO (CN) – A class of employees at the Kaiser Foundation hospital call center have struck a deal with the health giant over claims […]]]>

Two former call center employees sued the healthcare giant, citing violations of federal and state payroll laws.

A Kaiser Permanente building near its headquarters in Oakland, Calif. (Coolcaesar via Wikipedia)

SAN DIEGO (CN) – A class of employees at the Kaiser Foundation hospital call center have struck a deal with the health giant over claims it still failed to properly pay employees.

Kaiser employed staff in its medical call centers in categories such as “telemedicine specialists”, “customer support specialists” and “wellness specialists”.

Former call center workers Monica Smith and Erika Sierra sued Kaiser in 2018, citing violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and California laws governing salary and time tracking protocols for employees.

In their class action lawsuit, Smith and Sierra said Kaiser failed to accurately compensate employees for certain tasks performed during breaks and after their shifts. Duties included locating work equipment, shredding patient notes, traveling to Kaiser training locations, managing computer stations, and traveling to meeting locations.

Kaiser also failed to reimburse his staff for certain expenses related to the business, the plaintiffs said.

The parties have already requested preliminary approval for a settlement and have since been denied twice. A first agreement in principle was reached in February 2019.

U.S. District Judge Karen S. Crawford dismissed the earlier motions for preliminary approval over concerns about the structure of the settlement and the scope of the proposed class action lawsuit against the FLSA claims.

In October 2020, the parties filed amendments and corrections to the proposed settlement and filed a third motion for preliminary approval, which the court granted.

The settlement class includes employees who worked at Kaiser call centers in San Diego between February 21, 2013 and February 18, 2021, while the FLSA collective includes employees who worked at Kaiser call centers in San Diego between December 21, 2014, and February 18, 2021

At a fairness hearing held on June 9 by Crawford, no class member filed an objection to the settlement or appeared at the hearing. Six of the 474 collective members of the group and the FLSA asked to be excluded from the settlement.

The deal received final approval Tuesday from Crawford and will provide a gross settlement of $ 1,475,000 which, after deducting relevant fees, will amount to a payment of $ 922,000 to class members. Class members will receive an average payout of $ 1,971, with the highest payout being $ 5,894.

Complainants named Smith and Sierra will receive $ 7,500 and $ 2,500 in incentive bonuses, respectively, while opt-in complainant Christa Fox will receive $ 5,000.

The parties allocated $ 203,000 of the net settlement to collective members of the FLSA.

Counsel for the parties did not immediately respond to emailed requests for comment on the settlement.

In return for payment of the settlement, the class members agree to release Kaiser from any claims relating to their lawsuit.

Crawford wrote in the June 15 order that the settlement met the four threshold requirements of number, commonality, typicality and adequacy of representation.

“The court finds that the proposed class representatives and their counsel vigorously pursued this action, ultimately leading to the settlement now before it, and faithfully performed their fiduciary duties to the absent class members,” Crawford wrote. “The court finds no evidence of collusion or antagonism. Additionally, the Class Counsel has experience in employment litigation and has successfully litigated numerous wage and hours class actions like this one.

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