Family Medicine – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Family Medicine – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 Type I interferon prevents the immune system from “going rogue” during viral infections https://jasonpowers.org/type-i-interferon-prevents-the-immune-system-from-going-rogue-during-viral-infections/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/type-i-interferon-prevents-the-immune-system-from-going-rogue-during-viral-infections/ Newswise — Hamilton, ON (May 17, 2022) — Researchers at McMaster University have discovered not only how certain viral infections cause severe tissue damage, but also how to reduce that damage. They discovered how type I interferon (IFN) prevents the immune system from “going rogue” and attacking the body’s own tissues when fighting viral infections, […]]]>

Newswise — Hamilton, ON (May 17, 2022) — Researchers at McMaster University have discovered not only how certain viral infections cause severe tissue damage, but also how to reduce that damage.

They discovered how type I interferon (IFN) prevents the immune system from “going rogue” and attacking the body’s own tissues when fighting viral infections, including COVID-19.

Their paper was published today in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

Lead author Ali Ashkar said IFN is a well-known antiviral signaling molecule released by cells in the body that can trigger a powerful immune response against harmful viruses.

“What we found is that it’s also critical in preventing white blood cells from releasing protease enzymes, which can damage organic tissue. It has this unique dual function to trigger an immune response against a viral infection. on the one hand, as well as to restrict that same response to avoid significant tissue damage to bystanders on the other,” he said.

The research team studied the ability of IFN to regulate a potentially dangerous immune response by testing it against both influenza and the HSV-2 virus, a very common sexually transmitted pathogen, using mice. Data from COVID-19 patients in Germany, including post-mortem lung samples, were also used in the study.

“For many viral infections, it’s not actually the virus that’s causing most of the tissue damage, it’s our heightened immune activation against the virus,” said Ashkar, a professor of medicine at McMaster.

The study’s first co-author and PhD student, Emily Feng, said: “Our body’s immune response tries to fight off the viral infection, but there is a risk of damaging innocent healthy tissue in the process. IFNs regulate the immune response only to target tissues that are infected.

“By uncovering the mechanisms used by the immune system that can cause inadvertent tissue damage, we can intervene during infection to prevent that damage and not necessarily wait for vaccines to be developed to develop life-saving treatments,” he said. -she adds.

“This applies not only to COVID-19, but also to other highly infectious viruses such as influenza and Ebola, which can cause extensive and often fatal damage to organs in the body,” said the first co-author. of the study, Amanda Lee, specialist in family medicine. resident.

Ashkar said the release of harmful proteases is the result of a “cytokine storm,” which is life-threatening inflammation sometimes triggered by viral infections. It has been a common cause of death in patients with COVID-19, but a treatment has been developed to prevent and suppress the cytokine storm.

Ashkar said steroids like dexamethasone are already being used to curb an extreme immune response to viral infections. The authors used doxycycline in their study, an antibiotic used for bacterial infections and as an anti-inflammatory agent, inhibits the function of proteases causing tissue damage.

Lee added, “This has the potential to be used in the future to blunt life-threatening virus-induced inflammation and warrants further research.”

The study was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

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Publishers:

Photos of Ali Ashkar and Emily Feng are available at https://bit.ly/3wmSw0D

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Medical students graduate in Scranton https://jasonpowers.org/medical-students-graduate-in-scranton/ Sun, 15 May 2022 21:34:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/medical-students-graduate-in-scranton/ Graduation season is upon us, and for more than 100 medical students gathered in Scranton, Sunday was the day they officially became doctors. SCRANTON, Pa. — This is one of many graduation ceremonies across the country, but for this class of 2022 From now on you can call them Dr Habiyaremye and Dr Joglekar. A […]]]>

Graduation season is upon us, and for more than 100 medical students gathered in Scranton, Sunday was the day they officially became doctors.

SCRANTON, Pa. — This is one of many graduation ceremonies across the country, but for this class of 2022

From now on you can call them Dr Habiyaremye and Dr Joglekar.

A total of 114 students graduated from the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine at the Montage Pavilion in Scranton.

“They’ve all paired residences across the country with the best health care systems in the country. We’re very proud of them. It’s a great class,” said Virginia McGregor, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.

The new doctors each overcome their own challenges along the way.

Terrence is a first generation student in his family, “I have family coming today. There’s a lot of my immediate family and then my extended family as well. Even my biological family is coming today for this occasion,” Dr Habiyaremye said. .

“Today it’s so fun to see the smiles on the families’ faces and the pride in their hearts. And the students celebrating the accomplishment of a job well done,” said Julie Byerley, President and Dean of the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine.

And the students say that as difficult as medical school itself can be, in the midst of all their training, the pandemic has hit.

“It really allowed us to get raw exposure to what healthcare really is,” Dr. Habiyaremye said.

“It made a lot of students, ourselves included, very resilient. I think it really underscored how important it is to communicate with patients and really understand what’s going on with regards to the pandemic. “, said Dr. Joglekar.

“They really learned to think on their feet,” McGregor said.

As for these two new doctors, one will go to the emergency room and the other to a residence in Hawaii to take care of the little ones.

“I am getting my MD in Emergency Medicine from Temple University,” Dr. Habiyaremye said.

“I graduated with an MD and am going to Hawaii to pursue studies in pediatrics,” Dr. Joglekar said.

Regarding advice for future students, Dr. Joglekar shared, “Don’t let the pandemic slow you down, like we survived it, and keep pushing.”

Check out the WNEP YouTube page.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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Greater focus on self-care can reduce burnout and improve work-life balance for providers https://jasonpowers.org/greater-focus-on-self-care-can-reduce-burnout-and-improve-work-life-balance-for-providers/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:58:51 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/greater-focus-on-self-care-can-reduce-burnout-and-improve-work-life-balance-for-providers/ Source/Disclosures Published by: Source: Swiner CN, et al. Doctors and personal care: does the balance really exist during a global pandemic? Presented at: American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference; May 12-14, 2022; San Diego. Disclosures: Swiner does not report any relevant financial information. ADD A SUBJECT TO […]]]>


Source/Disclosures

Source:

Swiner CN, et al. Doctors and personal care: does the balance really exist during a global pandemic? Presented at: American Association of Clinical Endocrinology Annual Scientific and Clinical Conference; May 12-14, 2022; San Diego.


Disclosures: Swiner does not report any relevant financial information.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

SAN DIEGO — Medical providers can reduce burnout by focusing more on self-care and work-life balance, according to a speaker at AACE’s annual scientific and clinical conference.

According to the results of a survey of more than 20,000 American doctors published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings in December 2021, one in five physicians plan to leave medicine within 2 years due to COVID-19-related burnout, including stress, grief, illness, feeling undervalued or underpaid, receive less support or feel overworked. C.Nicole Swiner, MDmanaging director of Serenity Hydration & Wellness in Durham, North Carolina, and former founding partner and family physician at Durham Family Medicine, said there may be a lack of medical professionals available to care for patients if too providers decide to quit In the coming years.


woman stressed at work

Source: Adobe Stock

“We all deal with stress, but we don’t have the same amount of tools to deal with it for different reasons,” Swiner said during the presentation. “We need to level the playing field so that we all have access to things that make us feel better.”

Overcome Mental Obstacles

C.Nicole Swiner

Swiner said providers can face several mental barriers that can lead to stress and burnout. One is the superwoman or superman complex, which is when a person tries to do too much between work, family, and extracurricular activities while ignoring their own self-care needs. Another is impostor syndrome, where a person internally believes that they are not as bright or successful as people believe, despite their academic and professional achievements.

“These thoughts are going through our heads, which keeps us from wondering what we really need,” Swiner said.

Swiner listed several simple steps providers can take to overcome these obstacles. These include engaging in positive self-talk, learning to accept and believe compliments, making a list of strengths, remembering how awesome they are, realizing that perfection is n is unrealistic and to seek help if necessary.

Another important strategy is saying no, something Swiner said is key to self-preservation and setting boundaries.

“Saying no is a self-defense practice,” Swiner said. “It will help you feel liberated. ‘Say no’, more.

To promote self-care, providers should create a list of activities to reduce stress, such as therapy, meditation, music, nature, and more. Swiner encouraged making time for these activities and revisiting the list when life gets overwhelming.

Reduce stress at work

In the workplace, employers can take several steps to help healthcare professionals during the pandemic, including engaging in more transparent communication, providing more childcare support, creating faster training for the deployment to unfamiliar units, providing sufficient adequate personal protective equipment, creating supportive environments, ensuring access to confidential mental health services and reducing work overload through better teamwork.

Individually, providers can reduce their stress levels by understanding the roles of their support staff, hiring more support, calling patients only when needed, not letting others take advantage of it, and seeking compensation for services, having a method to track results, being an effective communicator, taking vacations and mental health days, dismissing troublesome patients, having allies and mentors, having a fun bag ready to spontaneously engage in enjoyable activities and start a side job to better engage in your own passion.

Finally, Swiner said, everyone should see a mental health professional regularly to guide them through life’s obstacles.

“We all need a therapist,” Swiner said. “It has literally helped me with the stresses of life in general. While we practice medicine, life goes on, our parents are getting older, our children are going through difficulties and we are trying to keep things going at home. We need unbiased people to talk to.”

Reference:

  • Sinsky CA, et al. Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Results. 2021; doi:10.1016/j.mayocpiqo.2021.08.007.

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‘It’s a miracle,’ Kennewick family recounts on extreme preemie journey https://jasonpowers.org/its-a-miracle-kennewick-family-recounts-on-extreme-preemie-journey/ Wed, 11 May 2022 01:10:47 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/its-a-miracle-kennewick-family-recounts-on-extreme-preemie-journey/ May 10, 2022 6:04 p.m. Post : May 10, 2022 6:04 p.m. KENNEWICK, Wash. — “I wanted to plan everything, set everything up for her and everything but,” Kennewick Mother Lizet Robles said. Sometimes, however, life has other plans. “Sometimes I look at her and I can’t believe she’s there, I just can’t,” Lizet said […]]]>

KENNEWICK, Wash. — “I wanted to plan everything, set everything up for her and everything but,” Kennewick Mother Lizet Robles said.

Sometimes, however, life has other plans.

“Sometimes I look at her and I can’t believe she’s there, I just can’t,” Lizet said of her baby girl, Savannah.

Kennewick couple Lizet and Francisco Robles, who also have two sons, said it was hard to believe their happy and healthy 17-pound daughter had a difficult start to life.

She was born on July 19, 2021, at 22 weeks and three days gestation.

“I felt so guilty, I felt like I had done something to her,” Lizet said.

Last year the Kennewick couple were delighted to learn they were expecting a baby girl in early 2021 and Lizet said her third pregnancy is going well.

“Everything was going perfectly fine, my 20 week scan went well,” she recalls.

Then at 21 weeks.

“I just felt a little bad,” she said.

After a visit to the emergency room and her doctor‘s office, Lizet learned that she had dilated two centimeters, far too soon for little Savannah.

Then her doctor called.

“He said, ‘I want you to drive to Seattle, to UW, they’re going to check you out and hopefully we can set up a strapping. I was admitted there until – who knows when. I remember crying and begging for her, but they said we were going to do our best, we are going to prepare the NICU team and wait until they decide to come,” Lizet said.

Doctors told Lizet that the outcome for a baby born less than 23 weeks old was grim, but they would do their best to save her. Until January 2021 at UW Medicine’s Montlake campus, there may have been no chance for babies like Savannah, but thanks to new research and a UW Extreme Preemie program, she had a chance to fight.

“We went live back in January 2021 where our first baby was 23 weeks gestation where we attempted resuscitation,” said Dr Thomas Strandjord.

The medical team was just months away from renewed efforts to save babies born before 23 weeks, when little Savannah needed their care. Lizet said they did everything to keep her indoors and gave her steroids to help stimulate her lungs and then she went into labor and delivered Savannah at just one pound and three ounces.

“Has been surprisingly successful and half of the babies we cared for at 22 weeks gestation survived to go home,” Dr Strandjord said.

The months following Savannah’s birth were filled with trips to and from Seattle, procedures, an operation, ups and downs.

“I just wanted her to be okay,” Lizet said.

The only day, in January of this year.

“We finally got a call and they said – we think she’s ready to go home and I just cried – I remember crying because I couldn’t believe it, you know, it’s been so long,” Lizet said.

Today Savannah is weaned off an oxygen tank and sees a physical therapist.

“She’s just living life, her little attitude, her fieryness hasn’t changed, it’s just amazing.”

The Robles family said they would be forever grateful to the team of doctors and nurses who helped save their daughter’s life.

“I’m forever grateful – like I wish I had the chance to say goodbye to each and every one of them and just thank them – thanks to them, she’s here.”

Main titles of KAPP KVEW:

Tornadoes confirmed in Umatilla County between Weston and Tollgate

Traffic alert: a section of Yakima Avenue will be blocked for roadwork

Drivers injured in crash at intersection WA-221 near Prosser, per State Patrol

Police: Sunnyside Carnival shooter targeted rival gang member, but hit 5 people instead

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Westborough company offers acupuncture healing https://jasonpowers.org/westborough-company-offers-acupuncture-healing/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:15:08 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/westborough-company-offers-acupuncture-healing/ Joe Foley is part of the Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts team. (Picture/submitted) WESTBOROUGH – For thousands of years people have used acupuncture to cure their ailments. Now here in central Massachusetts, the practice is gaining momentum, according to Joe Foley of Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts, which offers acupuncture treatments, Tai Chi and Qigong sessions. “A […]]]>
Joe Foley is part of the Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts team. (Picture/submitted)

WESTBOROUGH – For thousands of years people have used acupuncture to cure their ailments.

Now here in central Massachusetts, the practice is gaining momentum, according to Joe Foley of Ancient Wisdom Healing Arts, which offers acupuncture treatments, Tai Chi and Qigong sessions.

“A lot of people come to acupuncture because they think traditional medicine has failed them,” Foley said in a recent interview. “So when they come to see us, they feel they have nothing to lose.”

An estimated 36% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine, according to a survey by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, a component of the National Institute of Health (NIH).

Acupuncture, aimed at balancing the flow of energy in the body, is one of the most common forms of alternative medicine. And as more insurance companies realize that acupuncture is a cost-effective modality and more of their enrollees seek coverage, it becomes more affordable to more people.

Foley is a 2021 graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Science. He has since joined the team at Ancient Wisdom, which is 17 and led by Foley’s professional partner and mentor, Lisa Spellman. Lisa Spellman also attended the New England School of Acupuncture and has extensive experience in the medical industry, having been on staff at Boston Medical Center (as an acupuncturist) for 10 years in oncology, pediatrics, and family medicine.

Ancient Wisdom recently moved to its current location Westborough after operating in Southborough.

“It’s a very relaxing space”

On a typical day inside Ancient Wisdom, patients arrive for appointments around 10 a.m. and drop into one of three rooms, where they are interviewed and then treated. “It’s a very relaxing space with soft lighting,” Foley said. “When you walk into our practice, you feel calm.”

“Most people don’t even feel the needles going in,” Foley said. And in truth, the practice predates needles. There is evidence for acupuncture that dates back 5,000 years and involves many other modalities to support the flow of energy in each individual.

At Ancient Wisdom, Foley said they treat everyone from pediatric to geriatric patients. Most suffer from some form of pain.

Spellman treats patients with many issues, including digestive issues, hormonal imbalances, cancer, and an assortment of other chronic conditions.

Foley said the most common question asked by the public is “Does acupuncture really work?” »

“We can treat a wide range of things that people don’t know about,” he said, adding that “Chinese medicine, which includes acupuncture, is the oldest and most widely practiced medicine in the world.” .

“People have been doing this for a long time,” he said.

Learn more

The risks of acupuncture are low, and common side effects can include minor pain and bruising.

Most acupuncture practitioners use single-use disposable needles to minimize the risk of infection.

With patients seeking care and getting results, Foley predicts plenty of room for expansion in Ancient Wisdom’s future.

Ancient Wisdom is located at 69 Milk Street, Suite 205 in Westborough.

For more information, call 508-871-6035 or 508-460-0444.

Business Profiles are advertising features designed to provide general information and information about Community Advocate Advertisers.

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Fans expect big things from Lindbergh’s Dane Bjorn after draw https://jasonpowers.org/fans-expect-big-things-from-lindberghs-dane-bjorn-after-draw/ Sun, 01 May 2022 21:47:46 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/fans-expect-big-things-from-lindberghs-dane-bjorn-after-draw/ Lindbergh pitcher Dan Bjorn throws without a hit. (Photo courtesy of Dan Hegger, InMotion STL) By Sally Tippett Rains All eyes will be on Lindbergh High School pitcher Dane Bjorn as he takes the mound this week. Bjorn threw a no-hitter on April 19 as the Flyers beat the Marquette Mustangs 6-0. Throwing that no-hitter […]]]>

Lindbergh pitcher Dan Bjorn throws without a hit. (Photo courtesy of Dan Hegger, InMotion STL)

By Sally Tippett Rains

All eyes will be on Lindbergh High School pitcher Dane Bjorn as he takes the mound this week. Bjorn threw a no-hitter on April 19 as the Flyers beat the Marquette Mustangs 6-0. Throwing that no-hitter is something Bjorn will always remember.

“It was great to finally get one,” Bjorn told STLSportsPage.com “Last year I got close but I never got to finish it. It feels good to see all the time that you spend on it (in baseball) translate into a physical result.

Lindbergh is about two-thirds through the season and sits at 11-11, facing a tough schedule. They are expected to be at the top end of their upcoming district tournament on May 16.

Lindbergh’s baseball coach, Darin Scott, wasn’t surprised by Bjorn’s success.

“Dane is a very gifted and talented left-handed pitcher who is as dedicated to pitching as any high school player I’ve ever seen,” he said. “It’s not surprising for him to throw a no-hitter because he commands 3 pitches and has the ability to vary speeds and locations really well.”

Bjorn, a junior, has been playing baseball since childhood. He participates in The Perfect Game.

As a sophomore last year, Bjorn led Lindbergh to the Class 6 quarterfinals of the Missouri State High School Baseball Tournament and was named to the All-Conference team.

He finished that season with a 1.83 ERA in 49 2/3 innings and led the team with 69 strikeouts.

Lindbergh’s last no-hitter was by Dennis Yingling in 2016 on the team’s path to the Final Four (against Francis Howell North) It’s quite rare to have a no-hitter in high school due to limits on the number of pitches and the weather factor early in the season.

Scott has great faith in all of his pitchers, but knows that when Bjorn is on the mound there’s a good chance good things will happen.

“Dane gives us a big chance to win every time he takes the ball because of his electric trick and his determination as a competitor,” he said. “His change is devastating ground because he can throw it in any count and they have to prepare for his spirited fastball in the upper 80s.”

Baseball has been part of Bjorn’s life since childhood.

“I started playing baseball when I was four,” he said. “Having an older brother who played baseball helped before that.”

The big turning point was when his parents signed him up for All-Star Performance when he was 10 and he joined the Gamers when he was 12. From there, he was lucky enough to work with former MLB pitcher Matt Whiteside, who along with his wife Bascha owns the baseball facility. Bjorn has been enrolled in their MACH 1 pitching program for four years. He is shown in the photo, left at All Star Performance (photo courtesy of Matt Whiteside)

“He played for me as a 16-and-under player last summer and he will play this summer,” Whiteside said. “Dane is a baseball player who works at his craft all year round. He’s a very dedicated young man, waking up at 5am two to three times a week in the off season to practice, back to home at 7:30 a.m., to school, then to All-Star for practice, and to bed around eight o’clock, to get enough sleep.

“I’m sure I wouldn’t be where I am today without Whitey (Matt Whiteside),” Bjorn said. “He leads by example, which I think is super important. He has high expectations, but it’s nothing he wouldn’t expect from himself, and having it last summer as a head coach made a huge difference by becoming a “pitcher” and not just a pitcher.

Whiteside is very high on Bjorn, saying he’s “a great boy and a really hard worker”. Hw says that ninety percent of players who spend their junior year with the Gamers (like Bjorn does) go on to play college baseball, and that’s been the case for 10 years.

All-Star Performance is a training facility in Crestwood that trains athletes of all ages and levels of play. They have instruction for the novice athlete, just getting into the game, or those trying to catch up with your peers, as well as comprehensive, top-notch training for more advanced players through their MACH 1 program.

Many of the area’s star athletes use All-Star because it has everything a budding baseball or softball player needs in the form of training, including Performance Training, and its in-house training partner, Elite Baseball Academy. . In addition to training at the facility, Bjorn is part of Whiteside team “The Gamers”.

“My first interaction with Dane was as a pitching instructor,” Whiteside said. “For four years, I would be with him during his team’s winter training. For the past three years or so, I’ve been lucky enough to coach him in games. He trained with the MACH 1 pitcher program, where he works with our lead pitcher, Andy Marks.

Bjorn’s family has been instrumental in his development. His parents played a key role in his pitching health.

“An interesting fact about Dane is that both of his parents are doctors and they are all very involved in his physical preparation,” Scott said. “They’re preparing him for the rigors of pitching with recovery, rehab and pitch preparation.”

Both parents are family doctors.

“Having that in my corner has been awesome,” Bjorn said. “Growing up I learned a lot about nutrition and how the body works and having them 24/7 instead of having to schedule a doctor‘s appointment was a huge benefit. “

He has two brothers Ian and Dylan.

“My older brother Ian played sports growing up,” he said. “My younger brother Dylan wasn’t the sporty type, but both of them worked hard at what they had a passion for, and growing up around that helped them tremendously. The fact that the older brothers are picking on you to toughen you up didn’t hurt either!

Bjorn is only a junior but he knows what he intends to do after high school: he is committed to Tennessee

“What I loved so much about Tennessee was Tony Vitello, the head coach. He leads by example and works incredibly hard day in and day out – and the fact that I had a great relationship with him made the difference. I also loved how Tennessee prioritized baseball and has a real culture there.

his Lindbergh High School coach, Darin Scott, is happy for him.

“We are thrilled and proud to have him committed to the current NCAA-Tennessee No. 1 team,” Scott said.

Preparing for the game after high school, Bjorn hired coaches Jeff Huse and Bart Emnett.

“They have made a big difference since I started training with them in September 2020. My body has had a complete transformation from being a 145lb to being 200. They have also been super good at showing the example and help me in my career.”

Both Scott and Whiteside expect Bjorn to continue his success in the future.

“His ability to set up and his dedication to his pitching routine is unmatched for the high school level,” Scott said. “He’s very poised and polished as a pitcher, especially for a junior.”

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Full Boston Public Radio broadcast: April 29, 2022 https://jasonpowers.org/full-boston-public-radio-broadcast-april-29-2022/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 19:56:56 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/full-boston-public-radio-broadcast-april-29-2022/ Today on Boston Public Radio: Dr. Katherine Gergen-Barnett discussed the end of the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and current trends in the coronavirus test positivity rate in Massachusetts. She also answered questions from listeners on this month’s edition of “Ask the Doctor.” Gergen-Barnett is Vice President of Primary Care Innovation and Transformation and […]]]>

Today on Boston Public Radio:

Dr. Katherine Gergen-Barnett discussed the end of the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and current trends in the coronavirus test positivity rate in Massachusetts. She also answered questions from listeners on this month’s edition of “Ask the Doctor.” Gergen-Barnett is Vice President of Primary Care Innovation and Transformation and Director of Residency in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University Medical School.

We then hit the phone lines, talking to listeners about the potential of sports betting in the Commonwealth.

Robert Baart and Peter Scott talked about the return of Fenway Studios’ two-day Open Studios event. They also shared their thoughts on whether there is enough support for emerging artists in Boston. Baart and Scott are artists with Fenways Studios. Their co-op is hosting its annual open studio event this weekend – which will be held indoors tomorrow, and indoors and outdoors on Sunday – on Ipswich Street in Fenway.

Paul Reville discussed the Mission Hill K-8 school in Jamaica Plain investigation and shared his thoughts on textbooks recently rejected by the Florida Department of Education. Reville is the former secretary of education and professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, where he also directs the Education Redesign Lab. Her latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders”.

Sue O’Connell talked about the Oklahoma Legislature’s ban on abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. She also weighed in on MIT’s Banana Lounge, a new student space with free fruit. O’Connell is co-editor of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC LX and NECN.

Harry Christopher discussed his upcoming departure from the Handel and Haydn Society after 13 years of leadership, and explained how the Handel and Haydn Society has adapted during the pandemic. Christophers is the artistic director of the Handel and Haydn Society.

We ended the show by asking listeners about the future of romance in the metaverse.

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Northwestern Medicine opens new immediate care center in Lake Bluff https://jasonpowers.org/northwestern-medicine-opens-new-immediate-care-center-in-lake-bluff/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:26:42 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/northwestern-medicine-opens-new-immediate-care-center-in-lake-bluff/ LAKE BLUFF, IL – Northwestern Medicine completed the opening of a comprehensive health center in Lake Bluff this month. Comprised of family and emergency physicians from Lake Forest Hospital medical staff and part of Northwestern Medical Group, the center offers family physician appointments and an immediate care center with laboratory services and on-site imaging. Hospital […]]]>

LAKE BLUFF, IL – Northwestern Medicine completed the opening of a comprehensive health center in Lake Bluff this month.

Comprised of family and emergency physicians from Lake Forest Hospital medical staff and part of Northwestern Medical Group, the center offers family physician appointments and an immediate care center with laboratory services and on-site imaging.

Hospital officials said the new facility will provide an alternative to waiting in an emergency room for people with non-emergency health conditions who still need to see a medical professional quickly.

Robin Zacher, director of operations at Northwestern Medicine Lake Forest Hospital, said Lake Bluff is differentiated from other immediate care centers by its staff of board-certified family and emergency medicine physicians and its laboratory capabilities. on the spot.

“Lake Bluff is one of the few venues truly designed and built from the ground up,” Zacher said. “And we recruited people to really start a program in this place, in this city.”


Northwestern Medicine officials opened the immediate care portion of an outpatient center earlier this month at 525 Rockland Road in Lake Bluff. (Northwest Medicine)

“We look forward to serving Lake Bluff and the surrounding communities, providing patients with high-quality, compassionate care close to where they live and work,” said Dr. Victoria Weston, medical director of immediate care at Northwestern. Medicine, in a press release.

The family medicine and primary care section opened in November 2021, while the immediate care part of the center opened on April 1, according to a spokesperson.

The center is open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at 525 Rockland Road, Suite 102.

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Korean red ginseng relieves stress, fatigue and may long COVID: study https://jasonpowers.org/korean-red-ginseng-relieves-stress-fatigue-and-may-long-covid-study/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 04:47:40 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/korean-red-ginseng-relieves-stress-fatigue-and-may-long-covid-study/ Attendees of the 2022 Spring Ginseng Conference pose for a photo. (KT&G) Korean red ginseng improves stress resistance and alleviates fatigue, especially effective in relieving stress in under-energized people with chronic fatigue and low blood pressure, studies showed Tuesday. At the 2022 Spring Ginseng Conference hosted by the Korean Ginseng Society last week, a series […]]]>

Attendees of the 2022 Spring Ginseng Conference pose for a photo. (KT&G)

Korean red ginseng improves stress resistance and alleviates fatigue, especially effective in relieving stress in under-energized people with chronic fatigue and low blood pressure, studies showed Tuesday.

At the 2022 Spring Ginseng Conference hosted by the Korean Ginseng Society last week, a series of studies showed that regular consumption of red ginseng products showed improved stress management and tiredness.

According to a comparative study by local family medicine specialist Dr. Kim Kyong-chol, who observed 50 people taking red ginseng products or 26 who did not,

The former group of people said they felt their condition had improved compared to before. The study observed people between the ages of 20 and 70 suffering from chronic fatigue.

Another research by Professor Chung Tae-ha of Wonju Severance Christian Hospital and Professor Lee Yong-jae of Gangnam Severance Hospital showed that red ginseng not only alleviated fatigue but also improved biological indicators of aging in postmenopausal women.

These findings are getting more attention from the medical community, as many patients are experiencing increased fatigue as a long-term side effect of COVID-19, medical industry insiders have said.

Symptoms similar to that of chronic fatigue may appear after recovery from the pandemic, lasting 3 to 9 months, according to the World Health Organization.

Meanwhile, research results on the antiviral effects of Korean red ginseng on the HCoV OC43 coronavirus strand and the COVID-19 resistance of Goryeo ginseng were also presented at the conference.

By Lee Seung-ku (seungku99@heraldcorp.com)

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A woman realizes her strength after an accident; family, recovering dog https://jasonpowers.org/a-woman-realizes-her-strength-after-an-accident-family-recovering-dog/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 12:37:39 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/a-woman-realizes-her-strength-after-an-accident-family-recovering-dog/ This April 2022 photo shows Kelli Smith standing with Bailey as she talks about her recovery over the past year from a crash in Orangeburg, SC Smith said one of the major changes since the accident is that 7-year-old Buzz, her service dog, has retired from duty and Bailey has now been “hired” for the […]]]>

This April 2022 photo shows Kelli Smith standing with Bailey as she talks about her recovery over the past year from a crash in Orangeburg, SC Smith said one of the major changes since the accident is that 7-year-old Buzz, her service dog, has retired from duty and Bailey has now been

This April 2022 photo shows Kelli Smith standing with Bailey as she talks about her recovery over the past year from a crash in Orangeburg, SC Smith said one of the major changes since the accident is that 7-year-old Buzz, her service dog, has retired from duty and Bailey has now been “hired” for the job. (Martha Rose Brown/The Times and Democrat via AP)

PA

It’s been a year of ups and downs since Kelli Smith survived an accident at North.

“I’m realizing this year how much stronger I am than ever before,” she said. “I even realize how much more resilient, patient and understanding people around me are.”

Since the April 14, 2021 crash, Smith and her husband, Mark, have been grateful for every day of steady improvements.

Smith said one of the main changes since the accident is that 7-year-old Buzz, her service dog, has retired and Bailey has now been “hired” for the job.

“Buzz is keeping a close eye to make sure he’s doing it right,” Smith said of Bailey, a 9-month-old Australian Labradoodle.

Even though Bailey is still training for her service responsibilities, Buzz remains the celebrity, Smith said.

“It’s really nice to see that people really care,” she said.

When the accident happened, at the intersection of US Highway 321 and US Highway 178, Buzz was either thrown from the shattered rear window or jumped out – Buzz doesn’t tell anyone exactly how He did it.

For nearly six weeks, the Lab mix wandered the North Zone.

Smith’s husband made multiple trips from their Summerville area home to North to look for Buzz.

Her husband also took to social media to ask for help from anyone who might have spotted Buzz.

Residents of North also spread the word. They put up flyers and spread the word on social media.

On May 24, 2021, the Smiths received a call that moved them to tears of joy. Buzz’s microchip company called, telling them he was at the Orangeburg County Animal Shelter.

Buzz hadn’t taken his daily thyroid medication for almost two months and he had lost weight, but he survived.

Buzz was happy to be home.

“He went back on his meds, but never got to catch up,” Smith said of Buzz’s recovery.

Smith said Buzz suffered from soft tissue hip and leg issues as a result of the crash, but thankfully didn’t have any broken bones.

“He wants to help, but he can’t do it physically,” Smith said.

Buzz can no longer ride in vehicles either.

Smith said Buzz was not a fan of driving before the accident, but since then has suffered from anxiety.

“The anxiety and panic attacks that are happening, it’s unbearable to watch,” Smith said.

Smith said Bailey and Buzz were good companions for each other.

Smith says she has made progress in her recovery over the past year.

Prior to the accident, Smith developed Guillain-Barré syndrome after contracting COVID-19 in the fall of 2020.

Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare neurological disorder that causes a person’s immune system to mistakenly attack part of their peripheral nervous system, according to the National Institution of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Smith led a physically active life before developing the syndrome, she said. Then Guillain-Barré syndrome challenged her mobility and she frequently used a wheelchair.

She wonders if she would have improved faster if she hadn’t been injured in the accident.

At one point, she thought she might never walk again, but continued her physical therapy.

“I tried to find the new normal,” she said.

The accident left her with a broken collarbone that required surgery to fix it.

“The collarbone they put together has so much material in it – it looks like an Erector set,” she said.

She has a scar from the collarbone to the sternum, she added.

Smith also suffered a head injury and concussion in the accident, which affected his vision and hearing.

Not all of Smith’s scars are visible.

Although she has no memory of the accident itself, she is now dealing with post-traumatic stress, she said.

“It’s here,” she said, pointing her head. “It’s just not in the foreground. Of course, my body knows it. I simply have no cognitive memory” of the accident.

Smith said her daughter would often tell her, “Hunting for good.” And Smith does.

The past year has taught Smith lessons in overcoming challenges.

These lessons include:

“Hold on to your faith. Embrace it and let it help you through this ordeal.

— “Don’t beat yourself up and don’t be so hard on yourself.”

“Perfection is an illusion. If your appearance has changed, whatever your scars, whatever your battle wounds, it means you came, you fought and you are still here.

Smith said she “constantly has pep talks with herself.”

She also finds strength in prayers.

A 35-year-old Gaston man faces two felony DUI counts resulting in serious bodily injury as a result of the crash.

The Northern Police Department charged Lamar Mack on September 20, 2021. He was released on bail.

Northern Police Chief Lin Shirer alleges Mack was driving a black Chevrolet Impala about 25mph over the posted speed limit when it ignored a red light and collided with the Volvo SUV of Smith.

Smith said her husband pulled Mack out of the Impala after hearing him scream.

On March 2, Mack was taken into Lexington County police custody on charges of first offense basic cocaine distribution and first offense narcotics distribution. He is currently out on bail on those charges as well.

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