Family Medicine – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 07:41:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Family Medicine – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 The Walk with a Doc program starts | News, Sports, Jobs https://jasonpowers.org/the-walk-with-a-doc-program-starts-news-sports-jobs/ https://jasonpowers.org/the-walk-with-a-doc-program-starts-news-sports-jobs/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 07:05:28 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/the-walk-with-a-doc-program-starts-news-sports-jobs/ MARQUETTE – A local chapter of Walk with a Doc has been started by Dr. Evan Loukusa, second year medical resident in the Marquette Family Medicine Residency Program. Walk with a Doc is a national program that encourages community members to improve their health while walking. “Spending time outdoors and establishing social relationships are two […]]]>

MARQUETTE – A local chapter of Walk with a Doc has been started by Dr. Evan Loukusa, second year medical resident in the Marquette Family Medicine Residency Program.

Walk with a Doc is a national program that encourages community members to improve their health while walking.

“Spending time outdoors and establishing social relationships are two important pillars of health”, Loukusa said in a press release. “It’s an easy first step for community members looking to change their healthy behavior. “

Walk with a Doc will take place on the first Thursday of every month throughout the year. The meeting time is 6:30 p.m. in the lobby of the YMCA in Marquette. The walk takes place along the Lakeshore Boulevard bike path. In case of bad weather, the walk will take place in the Upper Dome.

Loukusa points out that 150 minutes a week or 20 minutes a day can reduce high blood pressure and the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and improve your overall health.

According to the CDC, “Obesity-related diseases include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. These are among the leading causes of preventable premature death. “

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Man With COVID Needs Double Lung And Heart Transplant To Survive https://jasonpowers.org/man-with-covid-needs-double-lung-and-heart-transplant-to-survive/ https://jasonpowers.org/man-with-covid-needs-double-lung-and-heart-transplant-to-survive/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 11:46:41 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/man-with-covid-needs-double-lung-and-heart-transplant-to-survive/ OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – An Oklahoma man is fighting for his life in intensive care after four months of battling COVID-19 and its symptoms. He needs a double lung and heart transplant to survive without a ventilator. Brian Karnes in intensive care. (Karnes family) Brian Karnes and his wife Rebekah, who run a family medicine […]]]>

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – An Oklahoma man is fighting for his life in intensive care after four months of battling COVID-19 and its symptoms. He needs a double lung and heart transplant to survive without a ventilator.

Brian Karnes in intensive care. (Karnes family)

Brian Karnes and his wife Rebekah, who run a family medicine clinic, along with their five daughters, contracted COVID-19 in March.

Rebekah Karnes said she and her husband, who is currently on a ventilator and almost died while battling the virus, were not vaccinated when they contracted it.

Now doctors say his only option for survival is multiple organ transplants, and so far they have been unlucky.

It has been a long road for the 47-year-old father of five. A week after the family contracted COVID-19, he was the one in the intensive care unit.

“His lungs were failing and the oxygenation just wasn’t holding up,” Rebekah Karnes said.

Brian Karnes had to undergo a treatment called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). During this treatment, blood is taken from the body, oxygenated and reintroduced, essentially bypassing the lungs so that it can breathe. Rebekah Karnes feared the worst.

“There are several times that we certainly could have lost him in this process,” she said. “It is sometimes terrifying.”

However, she said her husband decided to fight. Almost four months to the day since his first admission to hospital, he spoke to KFOR through a valve.

The photo goes with the story
Brian and his wife Rebekah before falling seriously ill from COVID-19. (Karnes family)

“I don’t want to give up,” Brian Karnes said quietly.

He had a waking moment in the hospital where he came to consciousness, his wife said. Now he’s making progress through physical therapy and working on getting up.

“It has been a real challenge,” she said.

But the fight is far from over. The 47-year-old still needs a double lung and heart transplant. Rebekah Karnes said COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on her lungs, which no longer swell on their own. It also caused right heart failure.

“It was very emotional for all of us,” she said.

Brian Karnes runs a clinic in Norman, Oklahoma, where his wife works. She said neither of them felt the need to be vaccinated as they mainly did televisions, as well as other precautionary measures like wearing masks and distancing.

According to Rebekah Karnes, they were climbing Mt. Scott and get outdoor activities before they get sick.

The photo goes with the story
Brian conscious, but still in intensive care. (Karnes family)

“We still don’t know where this came from,” she said. “We don’t know how he got sick.”

She added that the vaccine has now become a topic they are discussing.

“It’s definitely something that has been a topic of discussion for us,” she said.

Now the whole family hopes for a miracle.

“We are in a difficult situation,” said Rebekah Karnes.

They are contacting other centers about the transplant and waiting for answers. She says they have had end-of-life talks in case the worst happens.


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Affordable Hepatitis Drug Brings New Hope to Millions | Health Info https://jasonpowers.org/affordable-hepatitis-drug-brings-new-hope-to-millions-health-info/ https://jasonpowers.org/affordable-hepatitis-drug-brings-new-hope-to-millions-health-info/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 02:45:29 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/affordable-hepatitis-drug-brings-new-hope-to-millions-health-info/ Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – Malaysia registered the world’s first affordable – and effective – new drug for hepatitis C, offering hope for an affordable treatment for millions of people globally at risk for a disease with few symptoms early, is difficult to diagnose and is often seen as a “silent killer”. The drug, ravidasvir, was […]]]>

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – Malaysia registered the world’s first affordable – and effective – new drug for hepatitis C, offering hope for an affordable treatment for millions of people globally at risk for a disease with few symptoms early, is difficult to diagnose and is often seen as a “silent killer”.

The drug, ravidasvir, was approved for use with an existing drug, sofosbuvir, in June, five years after the Malaysian government partnered with the Drugs for Neglected Diseases (DNDi) initiative, a collaborative research organization on non-profit drugs to develop the drug.

“We decided to work with middle-income countries to try to develop an effective treatment,” said Jean-Michel Piedagnel, director of DNDi Southeast Asia. “We have started the clinical trial in Malaysia and Thailand saying that we will also bring affordable treatment to market.”

The new drug is a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) developed with Pharco, an Egyptian generic drug maker, and is an effort to increase competition in a market dominated by the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies. Sofosbuvir – the first DAA – gained approval in the United States in 2013.

According to the World Health Organization, some 71 million people around the world are living with hepatitis C, a blood-borne virus that can cause cirrhosis and is one of the main causes of liver cancer. There is no vaccine for the disease, which often has no particular symptoms until the liver is infected.

For years the disease has been treated with a range of drugs which have had debilitating side effects and often made people feel worse.

DAAs were a “revolution”, according to Piedagnel, offering patients, for the first time, an effective remedy and fewer side effects.

But sofosbuvir – under patent from US drug maker Gilead – was expensive and out of reach of many middle-income and developing countries. “Hepatitis C drugs have always been very expensive in the Western Pacific region because we only have high and middle income countries, classified by the World Bank,” Dr Po-Lin Chan explained, WHO chief medical officer for viral hepatitis.

China, Malaysia and Thailand were among the countries excluded from Gilead’s voluntary licenses in 2014.

An electron microscope image from the US CDC shows a cluster of hepatitis virions of an unknown strain. Hepatitis C can cause long-term liver damage and cancer [File: EH Cook Jr/CDC via AP Photo]

That year, a study from the University of Malaysia estimated that at least 400,000 people lived in Malaysia with hepatitis C.

Among them was Ng Song Ping, 49.

Illness had drained him of all energy.

“Even though I was working just a little, I was exhausted, drowsy, couldn’t work for long,” he said. “Even taking a shower, eating, watching TV made me tired. “

Ng was one of 300 people who joined the clinical trial for ravidasvir plus sofosbuvir that began in 2016. Three months after starting treatment, tests showed no evidence of the virus.

“Now I’m already fine, the fatigue and drowsiness are gone,” he told Al Jazeera. “Now I work every day, 365 days a year, I don’t take any vacation. I have made a vegetable farm, I plant the vegetables, harvest them, deliver them to stores every day.

Patent change

Under the legal conditions of the clinical trial, Malaysia was able to access affordable sofosbuvir by importing the drug from Egypt, which had rejected the patent on the drug, allowing it to be produced by generic manufacturers. .

In 2017, Malaysia took a controversial step by issuing a compulsory license for sofosbuvir, which allowed it to import the drug into the country under World Trade Organization rules.

“Under international law, if the product is patented and a country wants to use that product for non-commercial public use, if it is an emergency situation, then there is no need to go negotiate with the patent holder first, ”said Chee Yoke Ling, international lawyer and executive director of Third World Network, a Malaysian research and advocacy organization. “In Malaysia, our laws implement this as government rights. “

What seemed like a controversial decision in 2017 is now increasingly accepted thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has changed the way intellectual property in pharmaceuticals is viewed.

“What happened in Malaysia provides a useful example for other countries. There might be an opportunity to advance the reduction of intellectual property provisions that do not benefit countries because there is a shift in the way these superpowers view intellectual property. For example, the United States approving the TRIPS exemption for COVID-19 technologies, ”said Fifa Rahman, who led hepatitis C advocacy efforts at the Malaysian AIDS Council in 2016 and is currently working on it. ACT accelerator for the global response to COVID-19.

The ravidasvir plus sofosbuvir trial, which was published in The Lancet in April, showed the combination of drugs to be very effective and well tolerated, curing patients 97% of the time.

With the success of the trial, Malaysia has developed a comprehensive access strategy for hepatitis C diagnosis and treatment, targeting local government clinics.

“In the long term, it will also be economical for us to prevent liver cancer, cirrhosis and liver failure, because the treatments for these diseases are more expensive, so it is very important for us to invest in public health. and that’s where prevention comes in, ”Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah, Malaysia’s director general of health and also director of DNDi, told reporters at a press conference announcing the drug’s breakthrough.

The government has worked closely with civil society groups, carrying out outreach programs in affected communities to identify those at risk and facilitate access to testing and treatment.

A screening study conducted in three Malaysian prisons by MTAAG +, a Malaysian HIV and hepatitis C treatment access and advocacy group, found that inmates were a vulnerable population, which led to inclusion prisoners and rehabilitation centers among the priority groups of the Malaysian national hepatitis C program.

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne disease that is particularly prevalent among drug users, sex workers and other marginalized groups [File: Kate Mayberry/Al Jazeera]

Comfortable access to testing and treatment for key populations, such as drug addicts, men who have sex with men, transgender people and sex workers, has been improved through training on drug reduction. stigma carried out by the Malaysian AIDS Council.

“I can’t say 100% that we have eradicated the stigma, but it has improved,” said Anushiya Karunanithy, who heads the hepatitis C program at the council.

“Healthcare workers are more welcoming now, they understand key populations. We have good family medicine specialists in some of the clinics who are also very close to the clients, so that the clients feel very comfortable around the doctors.

‘Silent killer’

From mid-2018, when affordable DAA treatments became available in the Malaysian market, the number of people being treated increased rapidly. “Now, we have treated over 10,000 patients,” said Dr Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan, National Head of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in Malaysia. “Even last year, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, we managed to treat 4,000 patients. It’s amazing, with all the chances we have.

Cheaper treatment should also encourage countries to conduct more tests for hepatitis, which the WHO wants to eliminate as a public health problem by reducing new infections by 90% and deaths by 65% ​​of by 2030.

“When the treatment exists but is too expensive, countries generally wouldn’t do large-scale testing because if a person tests positive. It is unethical not to provide the treatment, especially when it is a cure that cures, ”Chee said. “Without affordable treatment we end up not testing and in this vicious cycle. Hepatitis C continues to be a long-term silent killer.

This month, Egypt, which has one of the highest incidences of hepatitis C in the world, also registered the drug and the ravidasvir plus sofosbuvir combination therapy is expected to be approved in other countries in Southeast Asia and South America.

DNDi aims to replicate the competitive market created in Malaysia in other middle-income countries.

“We are talking with a number of international agencies to see if we can use this value chain idea to create a coalition in the south of the world, a kind of south-south value chain for hepatitis elimination. C, ”Piedagnel said. .


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PHH to Host Dr Gary Dugan Memorial Virtual Walk / Run | Way of life https://jasonpowers.org/phh-to-host-dr-gary-dugan-memorial-virtual-walk-run-way-of-life/ https://jasonpowers.org/phh-to-host-dr-gary-dugan-memorial-virtual-walk-run-way-of-life/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/phh-to-host-dr-gary-dugan-memorial-virtual-walk-run-way-of-life/ DuBOIS – Penn Highlands Healthcare has opened registration for its annual walk and ‘fun run’ in memory of Dr Gary DuGan, the former Chief Medical Officer of Penn Highlands Healthcare. This year’s race will take place in person and virtually, with participants able to complete their virtual race anytime between Saturday August 15 at midnight […]]]>

DuBOIS – Penn Highlands Healthcare has opened registration for its annual walk and ‘fun run’ in memory of Dr Gary DuGan, the former Chief Medical Officer of Penn Highlands Healthcare.

This year’s race will take place in person and virtually, with participants able to complete their virtual race anytime between Saturday August 15 at midnight and Saturday August 21 at 11:59 pm. The live event will take place on August 21 at DuBois City Park, the Edward V. Cherry Amphitheater and the DuBois Footbridge. Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. with a race start time at 9 a.m.

“We are thrilled to be holding our fourth annual Dr. Gary DuGan Memorial 5K Walk / Run in person and virtually this year in honor of Dr. DuGan’s memory. We also hope this year’s virtual run option will provide additional flexibility that will inspire even more community members to participate, ”said Danyell Bundy, Head of Development for Penn Highlands Healthcare Fund for Major Donations. “Dr. DuGan was a respected physician, as well as a family man. As our healthcare system continues to grow, we are grateful for how the community celebrates his legacy and for all he has brought to Penn. Highlands.

To accommodate families and participants of all ages, Penn Highlands offers two categories of registration. First, the event features a free one-mile walk / run, only for people twelve and under. Participants in the walk can make a monetary donation of their choice. There is a $ 30 registration fee for 5K participants. Please note that registration will require a payment processing fee.

DuGan is remembered for his many contributions to PHH, especially as a full-fledged figure in the development of the Healthcare System Drug Graduate Education Program, to which all proceeds from the race will be donated. The Penn Highlands GME program provides medical students and recent medical school graduates with opportunities for internships and one-on-one meetings with referring physicians, and helps equip family medicine residents with the inpatient and outpatient training they require. need to prepare to meet the demands of rural areas. health


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Tennis: the City Championships tournament starts Monday at the Bossier Tennis Center https://jasonpowers.org/tennis-the-city-championships-tournament-starts-monday-at-the-bossier-tennis-center/ https://jasonpowers.org/tennis-the-city-championships-tournament-starts-monday-at-the-bossier-tennis-center/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 01:01:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/tennis-the-city-championships-tournament-starts-monday-at-the-bossier-tennis-center/ The Louisiana Family Medicine Clinic City Championships tournament begins Monday at the Bossier Tennis Center. This is the fourth consecutive year that the event has been played at the North Bossier site. While the tournament started on Monday, most games will be played on the weekend starting Thursday and will end with finals in several […]]]>

The Louisiana Family Medicine Clinic City Championships tournament begins Monday at the Bossier Tennis Center.

This is the fourth consecutive year that the event has been played at the North Bossier site.

While the tournament started on Monday, most games will be played on the weekend starting Thursday and will end with finals in several divisions on Sunday.

James McMaster of Shreveport, who won the title in 2018, is the No. 1 seed in the men’s open singles. Bossier City’s Anna Harvey is back to defend her women’s singles title.

Once a staple of the local sports calendar, the tournament was relaunched in 2018 after a 10-year period of inactivity.

It all started with just the men’s singles. This year’s event has 23 divisions. Among these are men’s and women’s doubles based on playing ability and the traditional divisions preferred in dual parent / child.

Cash prizes will be awarded to first, second and third place in men’s and women’s open singles and doubles. The amount depends on the size of the division’s draw.

The open men’s singles traditionally has the biggest draw with 37 players signing up this year.

In total, around 270 players are registered. Although known as The City, anyone living in northern or central Louisiana (Alexandria and any northern city) is eligible to play. In addition, anyone who has lived in the Northwestern Louisiana area for five consecutive years at any time in their life is eligible.

Last year’s tournament was named the best adult tournament of 2020 by the USTA Southern Chapter, which includes nine states.

“The past year has been amazing,” said Jeffrey Goodman, one of the four people involved in organizing the event. “In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we decided it was safe to host the tournament and that we had to. And over 200 players came to play.

Bossier Tennis Center pro Todd Killen, assistant pro Bianca Schultz and longtime local player Rick Holland are also helping to keep things going.

This year’s event will have something new.

“Every year we try to take a step back and see what works and what can be improved and make several changes,” Goodman said. “One of the most exciting additions to the city this year is the creation of the City Hall of Fame and the induction of our first member, Marilyn Rogers Garner.

The ceremony honoring Garner, who, along with her sister Carolyn, was a mainstay of women’s open divisions from the early 1950s to the 1970s, will take place at noon on Sunday before the men’s singles final.

There is no entrance fee for spectators. Weekday games will generally start at 5:30 p.m. and end around 9:30 p.m. The weekend matches will start at 8 a.m. and end around 6 p.m.

The open singles finals are scheduled for Sunday at 12:30 p.m.

The remaining seeds in men’s singles are No.2 Stafford Yerger of Shreveport, No.3 John Gray Pou of Shreveport, No.4 Andrew Otzenberger of Shreveport, No.5 Kirk Fisher of Monroe, No.6 Erik Graves of Shreveport, No. 7 Goodman of Shreveport and No. 8 Will Street of Shreveport

The trucks with food to buy will be at the Bossier Tennis Center on Thursday (Sliders), Friday (Yeero Yeero) and Saturday (Ono’s). The barbecue will be available Wednesday evening and Sunday.

– Featured photo by Stafford Yerger courtesy of Jeffrey Goodman


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Dr John Sites retires from FWB Magnolia Medical Clinic https://jasonpowers.org/dr-john-sites-retires-from-fwb-magnolia-medical-clinic/ https://jasonpowers.org/dr-john-sites-retires-from-fwb-magnolia-medical-clinic/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 11:05:14 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/dr-john-sites-retires-from-fwb-magnolia-medical-clinic/ FORT WALTON BEACH – On Friday night, Dr John Sites saw the most patients he has possibly ever seen in a day. About 100 cars have passed through the Magnolia Medical Clinic in Fort Walton Beach, but this time not for medical reasons. Instead, they marched to say thank you and goodbye to Sites as […]]]>

FORT WALTON BEACH – On Friday night, Dr John Sites saw the most patients he has possibly ever seen in a day.

About 100 cars have passed through the Magnolia Medical Clinic in Fort Walton Beach, but this time not for medical reasons. Instead, they marched to say thank you and goodbye to Sites as he retired.

Sites graduated from Indiana University School of Medicine in 1980.

You might like:FWB Medical Center’s first employee retires after 47 years

And:Senior Choctawhatchee Injured In Watercraft Crash Gets New Leg

“He’s the best doctor by far,” says longtime friend and patient of Dr John Sites

Longtime friend and patient Tommy Britt finds it hard to describe Sites as a doctor, not least because Sites is the only doctor he’s ever had.


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Portsmouth Regional Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program enters second year https://jasonpowers.org/portsmouth-regional-hospital-graduate-medical-education-program-enters-second-year/ https://jasonpowers.org/portsmouth-regional-hospital-graduate-medical-education-program-enters-second-year/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 13:14:03 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/portsmouth-regional-hospital-graduate-medical-education-program-enters-second-year/ PORTSMOUTH – Portsmouth Regional Hospital is expanding efforts to educate the next generation of healthcare providers. The hospital began the second academic year of its graduate program in medicine on July 1, 2021, as an affiliate member of Tufts University School of Medicine. PRH has initial accreditation status for its three-year internal medicine residency program, […]]]>

PORTSMOUTH – Portsmouth Regional Hospital is expanding efforts to educate the next generation of healthcare providers. The hospital began the second academic year of its graduate program in medicine on July 1, 2021, as an affiliate member of Tufts University School of Medicine. PRH has initial accreditation status for its three-year internal medicine residency program, family medicine residency program, as well as initial accreditation for its psychiatry residency program from the Accreditation Council for Teaching higher medical. Portsmouth Regional Hospital is the third teaching hospital in the State of New Hampshire and the first in 25 years, along with Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Concord Hospital.

“This year we welcomed 24 new residents to Portsmouth Regional Hospital – 10 in internal medicine, eight in family medicine and six in psychiatry. With this new class, our graduate medical education program has a total of 41 residents, ”said Dean Carucci, Managing Director of Portsmouth Regional Hospital. “The strong clinical capabilities of the Portsmouth Regional Hospital along with its comprehensive outpatient clinics are the foundation of a well-rounded residence. These foundational elements, coupled with Tufts University School of Medicine’s deep history and success in generating nationally recognized talent from its medical school programs, will benefit residents of the Greater Seacoast during years.


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Summer is a good time to get up to date with vaccinations | Health https://jasonpowers.org/summer-is-a-good-time-to-get-up-to-date-with-vaccinations-health/ https://jasonpowers.org/summer-is-a-good-time-to-get-up-to-date-with-vaccinations-health/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/summer-is-a-good-time-to-get-up-to-date-with-vaccinations-health/ At Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Medical School, Dr Swathi Gowtham’s teachers, who were infectious disease physicians, told his class that they used to see children with bacterial meningitis both. days. “When I was training, due to the Haemophilus flu shots and strep pneumonia (which can cause meningitis), I would see a child every few months,” […]]]>

At Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Medical School, Dr Swathi Gowtham’s teachers, who were infectious disease physicians, told his class that they used to see children with bacterial meningitis both. days.

“When I was training, due to the Haemophilus flu shots and strep pneumonia (which can cause meningitis), I would see a child every few months,” said Gowtham, pediatric infectious disease specialist at Geisinger. “And that’s what the vaccinations did.”

Over the past year, many of us have delayed regular medical checkups, but with COVID-19 cases declining, summer can be a good time to make sure we’re catching up on our vaccinations.

“The pandemic has reduced visits to doctors’ offices, so we should take advantage of the summer to catch up and see our doctor to make sure not only that we are not missing out on vaccinations, but also important health screenings. “said Gowtham.

We all know that we are supposed to get vaccines against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (pertussis) every 10 years. But honestly, after school is over, most of us forget about vaccines – how important are they in keeping us healthy?

“These vaccines do a great job of preventing not only the disease, but also its complicated side effects,” said Sonia Reich, nurse practitioner at Family Medicine of Evangelical – Milton. “The problem with many diseases that vaccines prevent is that I don’t know if you are going to develop a mild case of the disease or a more complicated case that might even have long term effects.”

Many adults, for reasonable reasons, don’t go to the doctor regularly, so they tend to forget about vaccinations, said Dr Robin Spangler, UPMC Primary Care – Lewisburg.

“But as people get older and their immune system, like everything else in the body, slows down and doesn’t work as well, it’s important to get vaccinated against pneumonia, flu and shingles,” he said. she said, adding with shingles, “I tell people that it is not fatal for the most part, but it is very painful and can have serious consequences.

It’s easy to ignore preventative vaccines like DTaP, but we would regret it if we developed tetanus, which is prevalent in the soil, Gowtham said. Tetanus toxins spread throughout the body, producing paralytic symptoms with very tight muscles and severe pain, usually resulting in the patient being admitted to intensive care.

“It’s incredibly rare, thanks to vaccinations,” Gowtham said. “But it’s very, very important so that people (can) stay out of the hospital.”

Fear of vaccines

When vaccines for diseases like polio and smallpox were created, people rolled up their sleeves in gratitude for the vaccines.

“People were eager to get vaccinated against smallpox and polio because they saw firsthand how devastating these diseases were, and they decided they didn’t want it for themselves or their communities. “said Reich.

Today, however, with so much information and misinformation, some people fear and avoid vaccinations, especially when it comes to autism spectrum disorders.

“I know people are afraid of vaccinations,” Spangler said. “There really isn’t any evidence to back it up. Study after study, the safety of the vaccine has been demonstrated.

Several years ago, a study appeared to involve the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine in children diagnosed with autism, “but it has been proven wrong time and time again,” Spangler said. “There is no association between vaccination and autism.”

The attitude of society towards science, government and medicine also affects decisions about vaccination.

“I think in general our society has become suspicious of anything that comes out of government, and I think vaccines are just another of those things,” Spangler said.

“The vaccines themselves are considered a triumph of modern medicine,” Gowtham said. “(But) vaccines are victims of their own success in that people don’t remember what measles looked like, and people don’t remember what polio and smallpox looked like. and because of this, they are more concerned about some rare side effects. But in general, vaccines are really safe. “

Parents weighing the risks and benefits of vaccinations for their children might feel better with the passive decision to do nothing, to let the virus run its course, rather than the active decision to choose a vaccine, which could lead to the effects. side effects of a fever or rash.

“Parents need to realize that if they don’t get their children immunized appropriately, it also has consequences,” Gowtham said. “And that presents potentially higher risks.”

She pointed out that 200 children die each year from the flu, children who had not been vaccinated or who were too young to be vaccinated. Vaccines therefore protect a community by slowing the spread of the disease and possibly preventing it from reaching more vulnerable populations.

If people stop getting vaccinated, diseases like whooping cough and pertussis could once again become common in our communities, Reich said, pointing to a measles outbreak in Williamsport a few years ago that was attributed to a bus from tour passing and stopping in the area.

“The idea that I want people to think about when getting vaccinated is that it’s a very kind thing that they can do for their community,” she said. “It protects you, but it also protects people who cannot get vaccinated. “

Vaccines in children

For schoolchildren, the PA Ministry of Health recommends:

  • At the start of kindergarten: DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough), polio, MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), hepatitis B, chickenpox.
  • At the start of grades 7 and 12: Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV).

With the success of vaccines, many ancient childhood illnesses are rarely seen today, and some parents have become complacent about them, forgetting how serious they can be, Spangler said.

“So you hear more about the potential side effects, real or imagined, of vaccinations,” she said. “People think vaccines are scarier than disease. “

She recalled her mother talking about the closure of community swimming pools during polio outbreaks.

“It’s hard to make people understand how serious this can be,” she said. “I have never seen a case of polio. I can’t imagine how bad such things would be.

One of the best things parents can do is find a healthcare provider they trust and can turn to for all their concerns.

“If they’re struggling and don’t feel comfortable, they should be having a conversation with their health care provider,” Gowtham said. “I feel like if we don’t vaccinate we could end up backing down and really hurting the kids who are otherwise supposed to grow and thrive.”

“I think parents are just trying to do the best they can for their kids. I am the same, ”said Reich. “I am never upset when people want more information or have questions when it comes to their health or that of their loved ones. “

Cindy O. Herman lives in Snyder County. Email your comments to CindyOHerman@gmail.com


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Pannier honored as the first Swarts family chair in biological systems engineering | Nebraska today https://jasonpowers.org/pannier-honored-as-the-first-swarts-family-chair-in-biological-systems-engineering-nebraska-today/ https://jasonpowers.org/pannier-honored-as-the-first-swarts-family-chair-in-biological-systems-engineering-nebraska-today/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/pannier-honored-as-the-first-swarts-family-chair-in-biological-systems-engineering-nebraska-today/ A fellowship sparked friendship led to Angela Pannier of Nebraska being named the first Swarts Family Chair in Biological Systems Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Celebrated on July 13, the nominated chair is an honor in the making, taking root in 1997 when a scholarship sparked a friendship between Pannier (then an engineering student) […]]]>

A fellowship sparked friendship led to Angela Pannier of Nebraska being named the first Swarts Family Chair in Biological Systems Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Celebrated on July 13, the nominated chair is an honor in the making, taking root in 1997 when a scholarship sparked a friendship between Pannier (then an engineering student) and Dr. Carol Swarts, a pioneering physician from Nebraska.

This initial connection has grown over the years as the two have shared similar career paths, opening doors and succeeding in male-dominated fields. The University of Nebraska Medical Center accepted very few women when Swarts attended. And Pannier, now a professor of biological systems engineering, was the first female faculty member to gain tenure in her department.

Swarts was born on a rental farm in western Box Butte County, Nebraska. Throughout his childhood, the family moved to several farms in several states while his father was a farmer. Swarts took note of the work ethic and values ​​of her parents, which inspired her from an early age.

Swarts mother Elenore Gakemeier Swarts was a first generation American and a trailblazer in many ways. She was Nebraska’s first female school principal. Her courageous demeanor and determination to be a model of success for herself and her family instilled in the Swarts children a deep respect for education. Her parents’ example fueled Carol’s dream of becoming a doctor.

“In the 1930s and 1940s, that was not a lot of parents’ goal for their daughters, and none of them questioned that I was going to be a doctor,” Swarts said.

As she had planned, Swarts launched a career in medicine. She graduated from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 1959. Despite comments from some that women shouldn’t be doctors, Swarts and her female peers supported each other and embarked on successful careers.

After Elenore passed away at the age of 99, Carol and her brothers decided to set up an undergraduate scholarship fund in her memory.

Pannier was one of the first recipients of the Elenore Gakemeier Swarts Biological Systems Engineering Fellowship, a fund that continues to support students. Every year since the inception of the fund, Swarts has made efforts to meet fellows over lunch or dinner. Upon meeting Pannier many years ago, Swarts saw a remarkable young woman.

“Angie was one of the first recipients, and just looking at her during her undergraduate studies, she was a representative of the region; she was a rock star, ”Swarts said. “She was encouraging other women to get into bioengineering, and then over the years I have had the privilege of meeting her and watching her grow.”

Likewise, Pannier was impressed with Swarts’ success, as well as her generosity in meeting her as a fellow.

“I was just amazed that someone with all of these attributes would spend time with me, a random student, and help fund my studies, which was essential for me,” Pannier said.

Passionate about the environment, drinking water and medicine, Swarts continued to support the Nebraska Biological Systems Engineering Program. When Pannier returned to college as a faculty member, their relationship turned into something bigger.

Swarts began asking Pannier what she needed to make sure the department had the support it needed to conduct cutting-edge research and pursue outstanding educational programs. Pannier’s research focuses on DNA vaccines, tissue engineering, developmental biology, and non-viral gene delivery systems for stem cell and medical device applications. This work – along with the work of its students – was beginning to gain national and global attention.

Swarts has expanded its support for students to include travel grants for graduate students. She also supported the creation of a hands-on teaching lab and an annual outstanding graduate student award. When Pannier brought up the idea of ​​funding faculty research, Swarts had a big idea – the Swarts Family Chair in Biological Systems Engineering.

The Swarts donation will fund the endowed chair, as well as several other endowed faculty positions. The cash allocation provided by the appointed chair position will be used by Pannier and the students in his lab to drive innovative projects and explore new areas of research.

“I am extremely grateful to Dr Swarts for his unwavering and incredibly generous support of our Department of Biological Systems Engineering,” said Mike Boehm, NAKED Vice President and Vice Chancellor Harlan of the Nebraska Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Our Biological Systems Engineering program has incredible momentum, and this gift injects more energy into the essential work of its faculty, staff and students.”

Pannier said she was honored by the continued support Swarts has given her, her students and her department to fulfill their mission.

“I’m humbled and grateful that I can not only hold the endowed chair, but I can also hold the endowed chair of the Swarts family, endowed by someone who has meant and continues to mean so much to me,” Pannier said.

The gifts from Swarts have created a ripple effect that will reward current and future generations of Husker researchers and students. It is these direct impacts on individuals that inspire Swarts to continue supporting education and research.

“I see it as what can happen with what I can contribute,” Swarts said. “I support the scholarship because I believe that students who want to learn and progress deserve this extra help and inspiration. “


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MAHEC expands its services in the county of Transylvania https://jasonpowers.org/mahec-expands-its-services-in-the-county-of-transylvania/ https://jasonpowers.org/mahec-expands-its-services-in-the-county-of-transylvania/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 21:36:47 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/mahec-expands-its-services-in-the-county-of-transylvania/ Journalist Lilly Knoepp speaks with Dr Brian Barrow of MAHEC Women’s Care in Brevard about the expansion of the OB-GYN office. The new partnership was launched in June. The Mountain Area Health Education Center expands its partnership in Transylvania County. When Mission Health System was purchased by HCA Healthcare in 2019, many local healthcare providers […]]]>

The Mountain Area Health Education Center expands its partnership in Transylvania County.

When Mission Health System was purchased by HCA Healthcare in 2019, many local healthcare providers found themselves renegotiating their contracts.

“I have been working here as an OB-GYN for 11 years.”

This is Dr. Brian Barrow. Her Transylvania Women’s Care office was linked to Mission Health, but now her office is called MAHEC Women’s Care in Brevard in partnership with Mountain region health education center.

“I had worked with MAHEC for the past six years, both on labor and delivery, then taking care of our high-risk patients and during our ultrasounds. So as I explored the different options, I spoke with them more and I mean, it was a natural fit, ”Barrow said.

Barrow is one of many local providers who have broken with the Mission Health system. He says he’s thrilled to be able to stay in Brevard and provide access to these important health services for women.

“So MAHEC is the only office or clinic that offers high risk OB-GYN care, which means they have maternal and fetal medicine, doctors who deal with high risk pregnancies. I guess the next closest high risk OB-GYN care center would be in Charlotte, or I’m not sure, probably in Greenville, ”Barrow said.

But Barrow says he still works regularly with Mission Hospital, and his patients give birth there often.

“Most do, yes. Some choose to deliver elsewhere, but most deliver to Mission, ”Barrow said.

He says the office sees an average of about 500 patients each month. Barrow says MAHEC plans to expand its office to include family medicine.


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