Clinical Assistant – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 07:44:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Clinical Assistant – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 Hospital Development Council awards medical scholarships | News, Sports, Jobs https://jasonpowers.org/hospital-development-council-awards-medical-scholarships-news-sports-jobs/ https://jasonpowers.org/hospital-development-council-awards-medical-scholarships-news-sports-jobs/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 05:23:20 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/hospital-development-council-awards-medical-scholarships-news-sports-jobs/ Courtesy Photo This photo provided by MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena shows, from left to right, Chuck Sherwin, President of MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena, Miranda Johnson, recipient of the DesOrmeau Fellowship in Nursing, Ann Diamond, Director of Fund Development at the MidMichigan Health Foundation. Not pictured, Kalene Krisan, recipient of the Gerald and June Kramer scholarship. ALPENA – […]]]>

Courtesy Photo This photo provided by MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena shows, from left to right, Chuck Sherwin, President of MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena, Miranda Johnson, recipient of the DesOrmeau Fellowship in Nursing, Ann Diamond, Director of Fund Development at the MidMichigan Health Foundation. Not pictured, Kalene Krisan, recipient of the Gerald and June Kramer scholarship.

ALPENA – MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena has awarded financial assistance to two students from the region to continue their path towards a career in the field of human medicine.

Miranda Johnson and Kalene Krisan have been named recipients of the MidMichigan Health Foundation Development Council Fellowships.

Johnson received the DesOrmeau Nursing Scholarship in the amount of $ 1,000.

She is pursuing her Master of Science in Nursing Education at Spring Arbor University. She is a non-traditional student who currently works for MidMichigan Health in the Alpena Emergency Department. Prior to his post in the emergency department, Johnson worked in long-term care, group homes, as well as the medico-surgical floor. She has been described as a pillar of leadership and she shines with her ability to impart skills and knowledge to others.

According to a letter of recommendation from a physician, “I have no doubts that Miranda Johnson is one of the most remarkable nurses I have had the pleasure of working with.” After graduation, Johnson plans to remain a nurse in the emergency department in hopes of securing a position at Alpena Community College to train future nursing students.

Krisan received the Gerald and June Kramer scholarship in the amount of $ 1,000.

Originally offered as a $ 500 scholarship, June’s family, Gary and Cindy Zolnierek, generously donated the largest scholarship. Krisan is also a non-traditional student who returns to school to earn her RN diploma. She currently works as a Licensed Practical Nurse at the MidMichigan Physicians Group at the Family Practice Office in Alpena and finds working with patients incredibly rewarding.

According to one of Krisan’s supervisors, “Kalene is hardworking and dedicated. She expresses a great thirst for knowledge, is very professional, reliable and responsible.

Kalene has been a medical assistant for eight years and upon graduation from the RN program she plans to earn her BSN with the ultimate goal of becoming a clinical manager.

Mary DesOrmeau was the former head nurse of MidMichigan Health in Alpena, and Bill DesOrmeau was an active member of the community. They are both now retired and live near the downstate family.

Funding for the Kramer scholarship is June Kramer and Gary and Cindy Zolnierek. Although the family is now in Texas, this is a gift in memory of June’s husband, Gerald, and a family gift in honor of June, whose philosophy has always been to help others.

All of these people recognize the value and importance of supporting education and quality health care.

The MidMichigan Medical Center-Alpena scholarship program began in 2002 and has since awarded $ 77,000 in healthcare scholarships to local students.

Those interested in more information on scholarship opportunities or details on how to fund a scholarship in healthcare can contact Ann Diamond, Director of Development at MidMichigan Health Foundation, at 989-356-7738 or ann. diamond@midmichigan.org.

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Local Medical Staff News https://jasonpowers.org/local-medical-staff-news/ https://jasonpowers.org/local-medical-staff-news/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 09:05:17 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/local-medical-staff-news/ LAKELAND REGIONAL HEALTH Moody’s Investors Service recently reaffirmed Lakeland Regional Health Center Stable A2 rating upstream of public bond financing. The A2’s assertion and award, according to Moody’s, reflects its expectation that Lakeland Regional Health Systems will remain the distinct market leader and essential supplier in and around Polk County. Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center […]]]>

LAKELAND REGIONAL HEALTH

Moody’s Investors Service recently reaffirmed Lakeland Regional Health Center Stable A2 rating upstream of public bond financing. The A2’s assertion and award, according to Moody’s, reflects its expectation that Lakeland Regional Health Systems will remain the distinct market leader and essential supplier in and around Polk County.

Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center Now offers Polk County’s only ROSA Knee Robot for patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery. The ROSA Robotic Knee System is recommended for people with osteoarthritis of the knee with symptoms such as knee pain, knee swelling, and knee blockage who have failed to respond to more conservative treatment measures. ROSA, which stands for Robotic Surgical Assistant, is designed to help specially trained surgeons tailor implant placement in each patient.

James C. Brown, MD, MBA, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as a pulmonary and intensive care physician seeing patients at Grasslands Campus and Medical Center. Brown received his MD from St. Kitts University of Medicine and Health Sciences and completed his internal medicine residency at Hahnemann University Hospital / Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. He completed his fellowship in Pulmonary Medicine and Critical Care at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. He also obtained a Masters of Business Administration in Health Care from Davenport University in Michigan. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Critical Care Medicine with a subspecialty certification in Pulmonary Medicine from the American Board of Internal Medicine.

Stephanie Jackson

Stephanie Jackson, APRN, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as the first surgical assistant at the medical center. Jackson received his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from St. Petersburg College and received a First Assistant degree from the National Institute of First Assist. She received her Master of Science in Nursing / Family Nurse Practitioner from Chamberlain College of Nursing, Chicago.

Sonaly patel

Sonaly Patel, MD, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as a gastroenterologist seeing patients at the Pablo Campus and Medical Center. Patel received his MD from Ross University in Portsmouth, Dominica. She completed her residency in internal medicine and a gastroenterology fellowship at Drexel University / Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia. She is certified in gastroenterology and internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine and specializes in motility disorders and esophageal / anorectal manometry.

Eileen Rodriguez

Eileen Rodriguez, APRN joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse in Endocrinology at Grasslands Campus. Rodriguez received his BS in Nursing from Keizer University in Fort Lauderdale and his MS in Gerontology / Adult Nursing from Florida Southern College.

Anas Byzanti

Anas Bizanti, MD, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as a hospitalist seeing patients at the Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center. Bizanti completed his medical training at the University of Tripoli, Faculty of Medicine in Libya. In addition to his MD, he holds a bachelor’s degree in petroleum engineering from Libya and a master’s degree in nanotechnology from the University of Central Florida. During her residency in internal medicine at Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, Bizanti served as the chief resident of internal medicine.

Ugo C. Nzeako

Ugo C. Nzeako, MD, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as a Gastroenterologist seeing patients at the Lakeland Regional Health Pablo Campus and Medical Center. Nzeako received his medical degree from the University of Nigeria. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Connecticut at Farmington and his gastroenterology fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Nzeako’s additional training includes a Callender Binford Fellowship in Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC, and a Masters of Public Health from the University of Sydney in Australia. For several years, Nzeako was a member of the review committee of the Gastroenterology Board of the American Board of Internal Medicine. Nzeako is board certified in gastroenterology and internal medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine.

Veronique Coraci

Véronique Coraci, PA-C, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as the First Surgical Assistant at Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center. Coraci received her BS in Biology from the University of South Florida, Honors College, and her MS in Medical Assistant Studies from the University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine. Certified by the National Commission on Physician Assistant Certification, Coraci has been part of the Florida American Health Education Center Scholars program which provides care to underserved and at-risk people in the community.

Tami Allen

Tami Allen, PA-C, joined the Lakeland Regional Health Physician Group as the First Surgical Assistant at Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center. Allen received his BS in Biology from the University of Florida, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and his MS in Medical Assistant Studies from the University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine. Allen is certified by the National Commission on the Certification of Physician Assistants.

April Novotny

April Novotny, RN, MSN, CEN, CENP, Head Nurse and Vice President of Clinical Services at Lakeland Regional Health, has been recognized by Modern Healthcare as one of this year’s 50 Most Influential Clinical Directors. The recognition program recognizes clinicians working in the healthcare industry who are viewed by their peers and a panel of experts as the most influential in terms of leadership and impact, according to Modern Healthcare. Novotny received her BSc in Nursing from Florida State University, MSc in Nursing from the University of South Florida, and completed her PhD in Organizational Leadership from Southeastern University. The full ranking is featured in the June 21 issue of Modern Healthcare.

WATSON CLINIC

Keeva Cleary

Keeva Cleary, a certified medical assistant, has joined the Watson Clinic team and sees the patients of internal medicine specialist Stephen G. Swengros, MD, and family physician Brett J. Widick, MD, of the Watson Clinic South at 1033 N Parkway Frontage Road in Lakeland. Cleary received her Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a minor in Psychology from the Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Massachusetts. She received her Master of Science in Medical Assistant Studies from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Worcester, Massachusetts. She is certified by the Florida Board of Medicine and is a member of the American Academy of Physician Assistants. 863-680-7190.

BARTOW REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Bartow Regional Medical Center recently expanded its surgical services team. Join the surgical services team: nurses Maritza Rivera, Cristy Link, Tiffany Tucker, Rosalian Rosario and Ariana Vazquez-Espada; surgical technician Kelsey Clark, operating room care technician Rachel collins and patient care technician Georgia Caruthers.

BAYCARE MEDICAL CENTER

Joe ivie

Joe ivie has been promoted to Director of Mission and Ethics – Polk Region of BayCare Medical Center. In this newly created role, Ivie will expand her responsibility as Manager of the Spiritual Care and Hospice Care team at Polk to include the full integration of the Standards of Ethical Excellence and Standards of Excellence for spiritual care, as well as other focused support activities incorporating BayCare’s mission and core values. Ivie completed her residency in Clinical Pastoral Education at James A. Haley Veteran’s Hospital in Tampa. He received his master’s degree in divinity from Regent University in Virginia Beach. Most recently, he obtained his Masters of Business Administration from Saint Leo University in St. Leo. He has been responsible for spiritual care for the Polk region since 2015.

HPITAL WINTER HAVEN

Steve Nierman, president of Winter Haven Hospital, April McCoy, nurse manager of the floating pool, and Claude Valmir, member of the January team of the month, from left to right.
Facilities Manager Seth Spangler, COO Diane Gibbs, February Team Member Glyne Taylor and Winter Haven Hospital President Steve Nierman, from left to right.
Linda Watson was Team of the Month for March.
Polk Head Nurse Misty Holland, Director of Cardiovascular Services at Winter Haven Hospital Casey Ford, April Team of the Month Jessica Hughes, left to right.
Audrey Molnar was Team of the Month for May.

Winter Haven Hospital The January Team Member of the Month is Claude Valmir, a certified nursing assistant at the hospital. The February Team Member of the Month is Glyne taylor in the facilities. The Team Member of the Month for March is Linda Watson, the administrative assistant at Winter Haven Women’s Hospital. The April Team Member of the Month is Jessica Hughes, an echocardiography technician at the Bostick Heart Center. The May Team Member of the Month is Audrey Molnar, patient safety coordinator.

HPITAL WINTER HAVEN / HPITAL WINTER HAVEN FOR WOMEN

John M. Davidyock

John M. Davidyock, MD, SFHM, FACP, joined Winter Haven Hospital and Winter Haven Women’s Hospital as Chief Medical Officer. Davidyock was previously Deputy Chief Medical Officer of AdventHealth’s Central Florida Division in Orlando. Davidyock received his undergraduate degree in Biology and Natural Sciences from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa., Received his medical degree from MCP Hahnemann University in Philadelphia, and completed his residency in internal medicine at Lehigh Valley Hospital in ‘Allentown, Pa. He is board certified in internal medicine and with the American Board of Internal Medicine, with a specialization in hospital medicine. In addition to being published and a faculty member at Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia, and Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pa., He also established his own hospital company, which provided hospital services in a number of hospitals.

LIAISON CLINIC

Bond Clinic opened its new physiotherapy and rehabilitation center at the Lakeland complex run by Dr Carrie Goddin, TP, DPT. This new facility is the Bond Clinic’s second physiotherapy site and marks a further expansion into the Lakeland community. Patients can come to the Lakeland Complex to receive the following health care services: physiotherapy, athletic training, athletic performance programming, return-to-sport testing, orthopedics, manual treatment, spine health, post-surgical care, vestibular rehabilitation and LSVT big Parkinson training. The locations of the two clinics are: Lakeland Complex, 2039 E. Edgewood Drive, Ste. 130, Lakeland; East Campus, 3000 Woodmont Ave., Winter Haven. 863-293-1191, ext. 3701. www.bondclinic.com.

Send medical news to features@theledger.com


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Biomarker Shows Potential to Predict Immunotherapy Benefits for Breast Cancer Patients https://jasonpowers.org/biomarker-shows-potential-to-predict-immunotherapy-benefits-for-breast-cancer-patients/ https://jasonpowers.org/biomarker-shows-potential-to-predict-immunotherapy-benefits-for-breast-cancer-patients/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 00:58:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/biomarker-shows-potential-to-predict-immunotherapy-benefits-for-breast-cancer-patients/ A biomarker that has been shown to be a predictor of response to immunotherapies in patients with melanoma also has clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer, according to a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. The study demonstrated that this biomarker, a molecule called […]]]>

A biomarker that has been shown to be a predictor of response to immunotherapies in patients with melanoma also has clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer, according to a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The study demonstrated that this biomarker, a molecule called major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) class II protein, has the potential to be a predictor of the benefits of immunotherapy with two types of breast cancer – early stage triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and high risk, estrogen receptor positive (HR +) breast cancer when expressed on breast cancer cells. Although immunotherapies will probably soon be prescribed along with chemotherapy for these breast cancers before surgery, most patients do not need to add immunotherapy to achieve a response to treatment. Without an optimal biomarker, clinicians do not have a reliable way to discern which patients need immunotherapy and which do not.

Clinical testing for MHC-II expression could protect breast cancer patients who do not need immunotherapy from possible treatment complications and additional costs. Immunotherapies are expensive and associated with significant toxicity.

Justin Balko, PharmD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and pathology, microbiology and immunology, designed and designed the study.

“These findings are of particular interest to us because, if validated, they could provide a better way to personalize therapy for breast cancer patients. So far, typical biomarkers like PD-L1 expression and the number of immune cells in the tumor have not worked. a good job of identifying patients who need immunotherapy, ”said Balko, lead author of the study.

Paula Gonzalez Ericsson, lead author of the study, added that “the test can be easily performed on patient tissue samples obtained for diagnosis without requiring additional intervention.”

Balko and his colleagues analyzed tissue samples donated by three patient cohorts:

  • patients with breast cancer not treated with immunotherapy
  • patients with TNBC treated with durvalumab immunotherapy and standard chemotherapy
  • patients with HER2-negative breast cancer treated with either standard chemotherapy or standard chemotherapy plus pembrolizumab immunotherapy.

They determined that MHC-II is expressed in a subset of primary breast cancers TNBC and HR +, and that tumor expression of MHC-II is associated with the response to standard chemotherapy plus durvalumab or pembrolizumab, but not to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone.

“The results of association with response in high-risk, early-stage HR + patients suggest that MHC-II may be a useful tool in a larger breast cancer setting and this area would benefit from further study. more in-depth, “said co-lead author Kim Blenman, PhD, MS, assistant professor of medicine at Yale University.

The study is considered the first to assess and demonstrate the predictive ability of MHC-II tumor for specific benefit to immunotherapy in breast cancer patients. The researchers also noted that MHC-II has the potential to be a pan-cancer biomarker predictor for anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 immunotherapies since its clinical relevance has been demonstrated with melanoma, cancer breast and Hodgkin’s lymphoma in this study. and previous studies. However, they are asking for a large randomized controlled trial to validate their results with breast cancer, which was based on a retrospective tissue-based analysis.


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Health insurers must cover all costs of PrEP, Biden administrative orders https://jasonpowers.org/health-insurers-must-cover-all-costs-of-prep-biden-administrative-orders/ https://jasonpowers.org/health-insurers-must-cover-all-costs-of-prep-biden-administrative-orders/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 10:09:28 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/health-insurers-must-cover-all-costs-of-prep-biden-administrative-orders/ Gilead Science’s Truvada for PrEP – Photo: Tony Webster The Biden administration has ordered health insurers to cover all costs associated with pre-exposure prophylaxis, also known as PrEP. A once-daily pill, PrEP uses antiretroviral therapy for HIV to prevent an HIV-negative person from contracting the virus. It reduces the risk of transmission during sex by […]]]>
Gilead Science’s Truvada for PrEP – Photo: Tony Webster

The Biden administration has ordered health insurers to cover all costs associated with pre-exposure prophylaxis, also known as PrEP.

A once-daily pill, PrEP uses antiretroviral therapy for HIV to prevent an HIV-negative person from contracting the virus. It reduces the risk of transmission during sex by about 99%, according to the CDC.

the Order of the Ministry of Labor means that insured persons accessing the drug – sold under the brand names Truvada and Descovy – will not face any copayments, deductibles or additional costs associated with PrEP.

This includes laboratory tests and quarterly clinic visits necessary to “monitor patients taking the drug to ensure its safe and continued use,” according to the guidelines.

Insurers have 60 days to classify PrEP as a zero-cost preventative drug. If they don’t comply, insurers will be violating the Biden administration’s interpretation of the Affordable Care Act, which requires health care plans to cover all costs for certain drugs and preventative services.

Although the guidelines require that PrEP and related services be free, they do not require insurers to cover Truvada or Descovy, with generic alternatives being allowed unless “a particular PrEP drug (generic or brand) is medically inappropriate, ”the guidance states.

The new guidelines from the Biden administration come just months after insurers were required to remove reimbursable fees for PrEP by January 1, 2021, NBC News reports.

By removing the financial burden of lab tests and clinic visits, the new guideline will “reduce barriers to PrEP and help prevent new HIV infections while advancing efforts to end HIV in the United States. “Carl Schmid, executive director of the HIV + Hepatitis Policy Institute, said in a declaration.



“It appears that insurers have responded to our previous analysis,” Schmid continued. “However, now we need to make sure that everyone fully complies with their legal requirements, including those set out in the new guidelines, and that federal and state regulators enforce them.”

Jim Pickett, senior director of gay men’s health and prevention advocacy at the AIDS Foundation Chicago, told NBC News that posting the advice had made him “jump for joy.”

“This has the potential to remove many of the access barriers we face with providing PrEP,” he said. “I look forward to dramatic improvements in access to PrEP, especially for communities most vulnerable to HIV. “

While once-a-day PrEP has been shown to be very effective in reducing the risk of HIV transmission, new forms are being tested by drug companies that could reduce the pill dose to once a month, or one injection once. every two months.

Merck recently announced that its monthly PrEP pill was found to be “extremely potent” in phase two trials and said it was “probably a little more forgiving” than daily PrEP because of its long-lasting nature and ease. monthly requirement.

Last year, GlaxoSmithKline announced that its injectable PrEP treatment, given every two months, was more effective than Truvada in reducing the risk of HIV transmission.

GSK said its injections were 69% more than once-daily PrEP, already reducing the risk of transmission by around 99%, with results so promising that clinical trials were stopped early and those who did had received Truvada offered bi-weekly injections instead.

Read more:

HIV vaccine trial launched, 40 years after virus was first detected

Senate Confirms Shawn Skelly and Gina Ortiz Jones to Senior Military Positions in Historic Firsts

Federal judge blocks ban on transgender athletes in West Virginia from taking effect


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PA students in Cumberlands receive white coats | New https://jasonpowers.org/pa-students-in-cumberlands-receive-white-coats-new/ https://jasonpowers.org/pa-students-in-cumberlands-receive-white-coats-new/#respond Sun, 25 Jul 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/pa-students-in-cumberlands-receive-white-coats-new/ WILLIAMSBURG – Students in Cohort 6 (Class of 2022) of the Master of Science in Medical Assistant Studies (MSPAS) program at the University of the Cumberlands received their white coats this spring, which means they have completed successfully completed the didactic part of the program. The following students in your area have received their white […]]]>

WILLIAMSBURG – Students in Cohort 6 (Class of 2022) of the Master of Science in Medical Assistant Studies (MSPAS) program at the University of the Cumberlands received their white coats this spring, which means they have completed successfully completed the didactic part of the program.

The following students in your area have received their white coats:

Zachary Hurley from Bernstadt East (40729)

Morgan Nickell of London (40741)

A. Trey Pelfrey of Hazard (40741)

The white coat ceremony is a symbolic ceremony marking the transition from didactic learning to clinical studies. PA students complete four semesters of didactic education before receiving the white coat. The ceremony usually takes place during the students’ second year of study. After the ceremony, they begin the clinical year, consisting of three semesters and ten clinical rotations. During these three semesters, they also take a professional development course and a comprehensive research project. Approximately 27 months after enrollment, students complete the program ready to take the National Physician Assistant Certification Exam (PANCE). After passing the PANCE, they are certified to practice medicine in their preferred specialty.

Fatimah Hussain, President of the 2022 UCPA class, said: “This past year has been a real adventure for us. The constraints related to COVID-19 have touched us all and have taught us a lot of patience, new medical practices, the importance of family. , and never take anything for granted. “

She continued, “What makes you a future medical assistant is not the white coat. It is the qualities that you possess – your compassion, your discipline, your selflessness and your intelligence. The ability to practice medicine. is a real blessing. “

Dana Campbell, UCPA program director, told the students at the ceremony: “You all make me so proud. To persevere in the face of what you have faced since signing up is amazing to me. Congratulations on taking this step!

The University of the Cumberlands is one of the largest and most affordable private universities in Kentucky. Located in Williamsburg, Kentucky, Cumberlands is a regionally distinguished institution offering quality undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, and online programs. Learn more about ucumberlands.edu.


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Emory & Henry Launch Horse Assisted Therapy Program | Latest titles https://jasonpowers.org/emory-henry-launch-horse-assisted-therapy-program-latest-titles/ https://jasonpowers.org/emory-henry-launch-horse-assisted-therapy-program-latest-titles/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/emory-henry-launch-horse-assisted-therapy-program-latest-titles/ EMORY, Virginia – Emory & Henry College will soon begin offering a new Bachelor of Arts in Horse Assisted Therapy. The college said Thursday that the program will begin this fall. The major is an interdisciplinary major combining courses in psychology and equine studies, designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of human psychology […]]]>





EMORY, Virginia – Emory & Henry College will soon begin offering a new Bachelor of Arts in Horse Assisted Therapy.

The college said Thursday that the program will begin this fall. The major is an interdisciplinary major combining courses in psychology and equine studies, designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of human psychology and psychopathology and how horses can be used to improve psychological functioning of a wide range of individuals, the college said in a statement. Release.

“This interdisciplinary program combines the college’s expertise in equine studies and psychology to create an opportunity for students who wish to use their knowledge and love of horses to provide therapeutic services to children and adults,” said Jessica Denniston, Clinical Assistant Professor of Equine Studies. “This major offers an excellent path for students interested in receiving higher education in various areas of mental health as well as in related fields such as occupational therapy.

The program will be based on the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) model of practice, so that students are prepared to become an EAGALA Certified Therapist. EAGALA is recognized as the standards organization in this area, the statement said.

Graduates will be prepared for careers such as Equine Specialist for a Therapeutic Center, Mental Health Specialist, working in a residential therapy setting, managing a therapy program and graduate studies in programs such as the Masters in Clinical Counseling in E&H mental health.


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CHAT SUMMARY: Doctors at Fox Chase Cancer Center Answer Your Questions About Breast Cancer https://jasonpowers.org/chat-summary-doctors-at-fox-chase-cancer-center-answer-your-questions-about-breast-cancer/ https://jasonpowers.org/chat-summary-doctors-at-fox-chase-cancer-center-answer-your-questions-about-breast-cancer/#respond Thu, 22 Jul 2021 01:52:30 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/chat-summary-doctors-at-fox-chase-cancer-center-answer-your-questions-about-breast-cancer/ PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) – Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States, with women having a 1 in 8 chance of developing it in their lifetime. When it comes to this disease, many people have questions about risk factors, screening, diagnosis, treatment, reconstructive surgery, and survival. In a live chat on […]]]>
PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) – Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States, with women having a 1 in 8 chance of developing it in their lifetime. When it comes to this disease, many people have questions about risk factors, screening, diagnosis, treatment, reconstructive surgery, and survival.

In a live chat on July 21, four breast cancer specialists from Fox Chase Cancer Center answered viewers’ questions about breast cancer!

About the doctors

Andrea S. Porpiglia, MD, M.Sc.
Assistant Professor, Department of Surgical Oncology
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Dr Andrea Porpiglia is a surgical oncologist specializing in the treatment of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric (stomach) cancer, melanoma, sarcoma, skin cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and neuroendocrine tumors. She currently sees patients at the main Fox Chase campus in Philadelphia, Pa., As well as the Fox Chase Cancer Center East Norriton-Hospital Outpatient Center in Montgomery County, Pa.

She received her medical degree from the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center and also completed a surgical residency there. Subsequently, she obtained her Masters in General Clinical Research for Healthcare Professionals at Drexel University before completing a Fellowship in Complex Surgical Oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Mr. Shuja Shafqat, MD
Assistant Professor, Department of Surgical Oncology, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Program Director, Microsurgery Fellowship
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Dr M. Shuja Shafqat is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon specializing in reconstructive oncology procedures for breast cancer, head and neck cancer, skin cancer and lymphedema. He treats patients at the main campus of Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University Hospital – Jeanes Campus, Temple University Hospital – Main Campus, and Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Dr. Shafqat offers patients a full range of reconstructive surgery options to restore their shape and function after treatment.

He received his medical degree from Drexel University College of Medicine, completed a combined general and plastic surgery residency at Lehigh Valley Health Network, and pursued a microsurgery fellowship at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Shelly Hayes, MD
Director, Fox Chase Cancer Center Buckingham
Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Dr Shelly Hayes is a radiation oncologist who treats patients and is the director of Fox Chase Cancer Center Buckingham: Fox Chase’s outpatient cancer treatment center located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Although she has expertise in the treatment of many types of cancer, her particular interests include breast, gynecological, prostate and lung cancers (as well as brain and spinal cord tumors). She is experienced in a variety of radiation therapy treatments, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, image guided radiation therapy, stereotaxic radiosurgery, and stereotaxic body radiation therapy.

Dr. Hayes completed her undergraduate studies in bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania and received her medical degree from Temple University. She completed a preliminary medical residency at Albert Einstein Medical Center and another radiation oncology residency at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Jennifer Winn, MD, MS
Associate Professor, Department of Hematology / Oncology
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Dr. Jennifer Winn is a medical oncologist specializing in the treatment of breast cancer. She sees patients at the main Fox Chase campus in Philadelphia, Pa., And at the Fox Chase Cancer Center East Norriton-Hospital Outpatient Center in Montgomery County, Pa.

It offers individuals the latest standards of therapeutic care for all types and stages of breast cancer as well as the opportunity to participate in a wide range of clinical trials.

Dr Winn received his medical degree from Taipei Medical University, completed an internal medicine residency at Abington Memorial Hospital, and was a hematology / oncology researcher at the University of Virginia Medical Center. She also holds a Master of Science in Clinical Research from the University of Virginia.

Copyright © 2021 WPVI-TV. All rights reserved.


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How to be a better aunt or a better uncle https://jasonpowers.org/how-to-be-a-better-aunt-or-a-better-uncle/ https://jasonpowers.org/how-to-be-a-better-aunt-or-a-better-uncle/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 09:00:09 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/how-to-be-a-better-aunt-or-a-better-uncle/ Start with a frank conversation. If you’re an aunt or uncle who doesn’t have kids, Dr Lakshmin said, it’s almost like you have to learn a different language. “You are not well versed in the world of being a parent. TV shows, toys, all the struggles, ”she said. “It’s really hard to know what questions […]]]>

If you’re an aunt or uncle who doesn’t have kids, Dr Lakshmin said, it’s almost like you have to learn a different language. “You are not well versed in the world of being a parent. TV shows, toys, all the struggles, ”she said. “It’s really hard to know what questions to ask. “

It may be helpful to start by asking your brother what his hopes and expectations are for you, said Joseph S. Tan, clinical psychologist in the Department of Family Medicine at UVA Health in Virginia.

“Different people are going to have different needs and wants,” said Dr Tan, “and some things they would rather deal with on their own, and some things they would like a little help with.” He recommended being honest about what you are also hoping for with this budding relationship and why you need your brother’s help.

You can also support your sibling by putting in a little more effort early on, right after your niece or nephew is born, Dr Lakshmin said. Maybe that means offering to babysit or help with laundry every Wednesday. Or if you live far away, Dr. Lakshmin suggested, you can send your siblings dinner one night a week for a few weeks.

“Things like that, which don’t even necessarily have to do with your connection to your niece or nephew,” she said, “but just support your brother in a difficult time, so your brother knows sort of like, “I’m here, I want to be involved.

Planning one night a week that you read a story together in person or on Zoom, or an annual vacation for the whole family, can take the load off your siblings and strengthen family bonds, experts said.

“The key is to have something regular,” Dr Lakshmin said, so parents will know: “Thursday night we don’t have to worry about dinner because it will be take out that my sister is going to. Or on Saturday night I have 20 minutes of free time to have a glass of wine in peace because Joey is going to buy a Zoom book. ‘ “


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Technical literacy and digital etiquette are essential for teaching telehealth in pharmacy schools https://jasonpowers.org/technical-literacy-and-digital-etiquette-are-essential-for-teaching-telehealth-in-pharmacy-schools/ https://jasonpowers.org/technical-literacy-and-digital-etiquette-are-essential-for-teaching-telehealth-in-pharmacy-schools/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 14:38:38 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/technical-literacy-and-digital-etiquette-are-essential-for-teaching-telehealth-in-pharmacy-schools/ In addition to teaching students the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other policies surrounding the use of telehealth, pharmacy students should learn technical skills and digital etiquette, according to a session at the ‘American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Virtual Pharmacy Education Conference 2021. According to session moderator Danielle Miller, PharmD, MEd, […]]]>

In addition to teaching students the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other policies surrounding the use of telehealth, pharmacy students should learn technical skills and digital etiquette, according to a session at the ‘American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Virtual Pharmacy Education Conference 2021.

According to session moderator Danielle Miller, PharmD, MEd, RPh, BCACP, pharmacists are reinventing the way they work in healthcare teams and how they can integrate this rapidly evolving field into pharmacy curricula . Although telehealth was first suggested 140 years ago in an article published by The Lancet, its practice has radically changed and continues to evolve constantly, according to the presenters.

“We need to prepare pharmacy students to know and understand the different forms of telehealth,” said presenter Pamela Stamm, PharmD, CDE, BCPS, BCACP, FASHP, associate professor at Harrison School of Pharmacy at Auburn University .

Stamm reviewed 6 different telehealth models and said students should be prepared for all of them. Electronic visits consist of messaging or email and may include the “store and forward” model, in which the patient takes a photo and sends it to the provider.

Remote patient monitoring is frequently used in diabetes and other chronic illnesses to monitor patient adherence, side effects, and other issues. Finally, Stamm said patients can also connect with providers via audio and video-only visits, or with case-based teleconferences that may include family members and caregivers.

While these models all use different forms of technology, Stamm said she has found skills that many students struggle with that may not immediately occur to instructors. These include managing passwords, incorporating new technologies, and using multiple screens rather than multiple windows. Notably, however, Stamm said the biggest challenge is dealing with all of these issues at once.

Presenter Tricia Gangoo-Dookham, PharmD, Clinical Assistant Professor at Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy, reviewed several other skills students need to know to communicate effectively through telehealth. These include digital etiquette, virtual communication skills, HIPAA compliance, and emergency care or triage via telehealth.

Digital health expectations should be established early in preparing students for an experiential environment. Unlike in-person tours, students need to make sure their cameras are on, their lighting is good, and their background is clear. These expectations can be set using modeling, discussions, vignettes, policies, simulation and practice.

Likewise, while patients may understand the communication skills necessary for in-person visits, virtual communication may differ. Students should prepare a greeting and closing message and can use a script if they find it useful, Gangoo-Dookham said. They should also inform the patient that they are taking notes or seeking information if they do not make eye contact, so that the patient does not feel ignored or disrespectful.

Ensuring HIPAA compliance is also extremely important when using telehealth. Students should verify privacy by using a headset or earphones, removing listening devices from the room, and documenting any security measures taken. Gangoo-Dookham added that they should verify the privacy of their computer, whether it’s using an encrypted device borrowed from their institution or using HIPAA-compliant software.

Finally, Gangoo-Dookham said patients should check the patient’s location and emergency contact information at the start of the call, in case emergency services are needed. Helping students work on what-if scenarios can also ensure they are prepared for unexpected changes during telehealth visits.

All of this information can be overwhelming, so having pre-session preparation is essential, according to presenter Kylie Barnes, PharmD, BCPS, associate clinical professor in the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Pharmacy. Students can be encouraged to use a script if they find it useful, and instructors can help them work on what-if scenarios in advance so that they feel prepared for any situation.

While many students may feel well prepared for face-to-face interactions with patients, telehealth can present new challenges and unexpected obstacles. However, by working properly in advance with students and giving them ample opportunity to practice, pharmacy students can be prepared for the future of the profession.

REFERENCE

Barnes K, Gangoo-Dookham T, Miller D, Stamm P. The Necessary Hub: Integrating Telehealth into the Pharmacy Curriculum. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Virtual Pharmacy Education 2021 Conference. July 19, 2021. Accessed July 19, 2021.


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Endologix Wins FDA Green Light for Aneurysm Sealing System https://jasonpowers.org/endologix-wins-fda-green-light-for-aneurysm-sealing-system/ https://jasonpowers.org/endologix-wins-fda-green-light-for-aneurysm-sealing-system/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 13:26:40 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/endologix-wins-fda-green-light-for-aneurysm-sealing-system/ [Image from Endologix] Endologix today announced that the FDA has granted breakthrough device designation for its Chimney Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing System (Chevas). Endologix, based in Irvine, Calif., Designed its Chevas System as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endovascular sealing therapy that combines the Nellix 3.5 stent with parallel visceral stents to treat patients with ‘a […]]]>
[Image from Endologix]

Endologix today announced that the FDA has granted breakthrough device designation for its Chimney Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing System (Chevas).

Endologix, based in Irvine, Calif., Designed its Chevas System as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endovascular sealing therapy that combines the Nellix 3.5 stent with parallel visceral stents to treat patients with ‘a juxtarenal, pararenal and suprarenal AAA, according to a press release.

The company is currently evaluating the Chevas system as part of the Chevas One Experimental Device Exemption (IDE) clinical study, which is expected to enroll approximately 120 patients at up to 50 clinical sites around the world.

Dr Francis Caputo (Cleveland Clinic Foundation), Dr William Jordan (Emory University School of Medicine), Dr Joseph Lombardi (Cooper University Health Care) and Dr William Quinones-Baldrich (UCLA) are the principal national investigators of the study. .

Lead study participant Dr James McKinsey said in the statement that Endologix engineered aneurysm sac technology in the Chevas system to reduce endoleaks – including gutter endoleaks – that are reported after treatment. endovascular complex aneurysms. McKinsey will present his first experience with Chevas at the Eastern Vascular Society’s annual meeting on September 26.

“The Chevas System represents an important therapy that provides ‘out of the box’ treatment to an underserved patient population with complex abdominal aortic aneurysms,” said Dr. Matt Thompson, CMO of Endologix. “We are delighted that the FDA has designated Chevas as a breakthrough device, as it will facilitate our ability to develop this technology and make it available to patients on an accelerated basis. The Chevas System joins the PQ Bypass Detour System as two breakthrough devices designated by the FDA in our clinical investigation programs, reflecting our aspiration to provide innovative and disruptive technologies to fill clinically relevant therapeutic gaps.


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