Clinical Assistant – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:42:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jasonpowers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Clinical Assistant – Jason Powers http://jasonpowers.org/ 32 32 Doctors in charge of the most complex health procedures in Canada cannot have a second wind https://jasonpowers.org/doctors-in-charge-of-the-most-complex-health-procedures-in-canada-cannot-have-a-second-wind/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:42:10 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/doctors-in-charge-of-the-most-complex-health-procedures-in-canada-cannot-have-a-second-wind/ Unlike the United States, with its many large private clinics and hospitals that offer complex treatments, much of the high-tech care in Canada is only available at academic health science centers, which are partnerships between teaching hospitals and medical schools, says Stephen Archer, chair of the department of medicine at Queen’s University.Getty Images/iStockphoto They are […]]]>

Unlike the United States, with its many large private clinics and hospitals that offer complex treatments, much of the high-tech care in Canada is only available at academic health science centers, which are partnerships between teaching hospitals and medical schools, says Stephen Archer, chair of the department of medicine at Queen’s University.Getty Images/iStockphoto

They are the medical professionals who perform some of the most complex procedures in the country. They train our future doctors. They advance medical research. And they are exhausted.

Many academic doctors were already experiencing a state of emotional, mental or physical exhaustion before the pandemic. But as Canadian surveys in recent years have shown, Burnout among this population of health professionals exploded during the first waves of COVID-19[feminine]. And some fear it will have lasting consequences for health care in this country.

“As part of the hallmarks of burnout, you stop caring about yourself and performance deteriorates and you’re just not engaged,” said Stephanie Garner, clinical assistant professor in the division of rheumatology at the University. University of Calgary. This can diminish the quality of training that medical residents receive and lead to medical errors, she explained: “It will have repercussions for years.

The effect on academic health science centers across the country could also be particularly detrimental.

Unlike the United States, with its many large private clinics and hospitals that offer complex treatments, a lot of high-tech care in Canada — including advanced surgeries such as heart transplants — is only available through academic health science centers, which are partnerships between teaching hospitals and medical schools, said Stephen Archer, head of the Department of Medicine at Queen’s University.

“So every hospital is important, home care is important, family medicine is important. But academic health science centers kind of hold the keys to all the high-tech medicine that we do, as a whole,” Dr. Archer said. “And so if they break down or get drunk, so does the system.”

In addition to clinical care, the teaching and research that academic doctors undertake, including research to find new treatments and cures, can suffer when exhausted, said Edward Spilg, geriatrician, assistant professor and holder of the Research Chair in Physician Wellness at the Department of the University of Ottawa. of Medicine.

“Clinical practice helps patients today, but education and research are what help patients tomorrow,” Dr. Spilg said.

Sheila O’Brien: We need a thoughtful plan to support our nurses, but also to attract more healthcare workers to Canada

In a study published in the Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine in June, Dr. Garner and colleagues at McMaster University found three out of four academic physicians and non-physician faculty members at the school The Department of Medicine reported burnout in a survey in early 2021. Women and early-career people were disproportionately burnt out.

The findings echo those of another study, published in the journal BMJ Open in May 2021, which found that 68% of doctors surveyed at the University of British Columbia at two teaching hospitals were exhausted. More than 20% said they were considering leaving the profession or had left a position. As in the McMaster study, more women were exhausted than men.

As an early-career faculty member and mother of three young children, Dr. Garner said she could relate. Trying to juggle teaching, research, clinical care and personal life was difficult enough before the pandemic. But trying to guide patients through an unpredictable, unreliable and sometimes inaccessible healthcare system — due to COVID-19 clinic closures and surgical delays — made the job all the more difficult, she said. . So have school closures, lack of child care, isolation, and fear of bringing COVID-19 home.

In previous waves, in-person opportunities to collaborate and seek advice from colleagues on complex cases, which are essential for a positive work environment, have also disappeared, as health visits moved online, said Dr. Garner.

Now that the country has emerged from the acute phase of the pandemic, some of these challenges and pressures have eased. But in other ways, things only got worse, Dr Archer said. Patient volumes are high, compounded by an extraordinary increase in the number of sick children in this respiratory virus season. Nursing staff are burnt out and demoralized, and academic doctors, who are often asked to comment in the news media on how to keep people safe, are increasingly subject to public abuse, it said. -he declares. All this contributes to the moral distress of doctors, he added, noting that mental health is now the number one cause of work stoppage in his service.

Another problem is that as academic doctors struggled to meet the overwhelming needs of clinical practice, their teaching and research often took a back seat. And as some labs have been closed and non-COVID-19 clinical trials halted, many setbacks have experienced setbacks that are not easy to recover from.

Sonia Anand, lead author of the McMaster study and a professor of medicine and epidemiology at McMaster, said she fears these setbacks and high rates of burnout among women and early-career faculty will lead them to abandon their research and educational aspirations.

This is particularly concerning because even though many women are entering academic medicine, few end up in leadership positions, a problem that has persisted for decades and is known as the “leaky pipeline,” said Nadia Khan, lead author of the UBC study and professor of general internal medicine. If burnout causes more women to drop out of academia, it could exacerbate gender gaps and lead to less diverse research, she said.

Too often, the solutions offered come in the form of personal advice, like getting more sleep, but they don’t actually solve the problem, Dr Khan said. The biggest problems are rather organizational and systemic, such as a deluge of administrative tasks and a high volume of patients, which prevent doctors from devoting time to patient care.

“They’re harder to treat, but without treating them we really can’t get to the heart of burnout,” she said.

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Pediatric Literature Updates https://jasonpowers.org/pediatric-literature-updates/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 16:09:51 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/pediatric-literature-updates/ Lucia Diaz, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology, associate director of the dermatology residency program, and assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, provided an overview of new pediatric literature in the joint session, “Updates on Adult and Pediatric Literature.” During her session, […]]]>

Lucia Diaz, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology, associate director of the dermatology residency program, and assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, provided an overview of new pediatric literature in the joint session, “Updates on Adult and Pediatric Literature.” During her session, Diaz reviewed clinical scenarios and questions that may arise in a physician’s practice and articles that will help resolve difficult pediatric cases.

Case 1: A healthy one month old baby girl with a large red birthmark on her face referred to a dermatology clinic for laser treatments.

In this case review, Diaz began by explaining that a large red mark on an infant’s face should immediately tell a doctor that it is an important case to be treated immediately. One of the first considerations for the clinical presentations described by Diaz is Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), a neurological condition present at birth. Angiomas can eventually lead to port birthmarks on the face. The forehead and upper eyelid are high risk areas for port wine and SWS stains. Laser treatment is the best option for infants with SWS or port wine stains.

“I usually start at a month old, if I can, just to get more optimal responses of 50% to 90% clearance with 8 to 10 sessions,” Diaz said.

Case 2: A 6 month old female, previously healthy, with a large painful lesion on her leg and sleep problems after treatment.

Diaz diagnosed this patient with ulcerated hemangiomas. Beta-blockers are currently the best standard of treatment for preventing ulceration in pediatric patients. Propranolol is generally the go-to beta-blocker selection because it has the most literature and safety data and is already approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Pain control and wound care are important considerations with painful ulcerated hemangiomas in pediatric patients, but some patients may have significant sleep disturbances with beta-blockers because they cross the blood-brain barrier. When considering other beta-blockers, some studies refer to oral nadolol as an effective alternative. According to a study referenced by Diaz, oral nadolol was not inferior to oral propranolol and had a good safety profile overall.

“The group included 71 patients and they were mostly evenly distributed. What really came out was that nadolol was not inferior to propranolol and it led to faster resolution in terms of how quickly the lesions reduced. Also, there was an improvement in color and other factors,” Diaz said.

Reference

Diaz L. Update on adult and pediatric literature. Presented at the 2022 Society of Dermatology Physician Assistant Conference; November 17-20, 2022; Miami, Florida.

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Comfort care homes build bridges to hospice for underserved patients https://jasonpowers.org/comfort-care-homes-build-bridges-to-hospice-for-underserved-patients/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 18:53:01 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/comfort-care-homes-build-bridges-to-hospice-for-underserved-patients/ For terminally ill patients who don’t have safe housing or relatives to care for them, hospice is usually not an option. Organizations called comfort care homes have worked to fill this gap. These are usually non-profit residential facilities that provide patients with a place to stay while they receive palliative care. These organizations first emerged […]]]>

For terminally ill patients who don’t have safe housing or relatives to care for them, hospice is usually not an option.

Organizations called comfort care homes have worked to fill this gap. These are usually non-profit residential facilities that provide patients with a place to stay while they receive palliative care. These organizations first emerged in the 1980s during the AIDS epidemic to serve patients who had been rejected by their families.

While some comfort care homes have paid staff, many are run by volunteers, according to Karen Cassidy, founder and executive director of Hildegard House in Kentucky.

Cassidy is a nurse practitioner, certified in palliative care, who has also worked for 30 years as a nursing teacher. During her clinical practice in a hospital, she recognized that the end-of-life care needs of certain patient populations were not being met.

“So many people who needed to access palliative care couldn’t. It’s a gap in the continuum of care. For the homeless, the hospital gave them money for taxis and sent them back to a shelter or just to the streets,” Cassidy told Hospice News. “For other people who didn’t have family who could provide 24/7 care, they would just put them in an ambulance and send them home. I wanted to take them all home with me.

This led Cassidy and a fellow nurse to visit the Francis House comfort care home in Syracuse, New York, to learn more about their care and business models. The upstate New York region has a higher concentration of these organizations than most of the country.

The visit inspired them to establish Hildegard House in the Louisville, Kentucky area. Named after Saint Hildegard of Bingen, the property is a former convent that welcomed its first resident in 2016 after undergoing around a year of renovations.

Like most comfort care homes, Hildegard House is funded entirely by philanthropy and receives no reimbursement from any type of insurance, including Medicare or Medicaid. All staff members are volunteers, with the exception of a qualified nursing assistant who works at night.

Hildegard House itself does not provide medical care. Rather, it provides a place where hospices can come to see patients they otherwise could not reach.

“They are often the forgotten people,” Cassidy said. “These are always the most difficult patients to place from a hospital’s point of view because they don’t have a home; or they live alone at home, and it’s not safe for them to come back.

Adults 50 and older made up nearly half of the nation’s homeless population in 2016, an increase from 11% in 1990 that’s largely attributed to an aging generation of baby boomers, according to the National Institute on Aging. (NIA) reported.

Financial and other burdens on the family can also be a deterrent. To research showed that patients who are faced with end-of-life decisions are less likely to choose hospice unless they have a network of friends or family who can serve as caregivers at home.

Additionally, depletion of a family’s financial resources is a better predictor of aggressive end-of-life treatment than patient preferences or demographic factors, a 2016 study found. study concluded.

“There is a huge crisis in caregiving. It’s a huge stressor for families now,” Cassidy said. “When the hospice started in the 1980s, the families weren’t as mobile. There wasn’t so much of that “sandwich generation” where people take care of both children and older family members.

According to the Administration for Community Living (ACL), a component of the US Department of Human Services.

The expense alone can be a struggle. About three-quarters of caregivers spend more than $7,200 a year on associated costs, AARP reported. For many caregivers, this represents 26% of their income.

Closer 20% of unpaid caregivers are themselves elderly, frail or chronically ill, according to the US Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Support for these caregivers is sorely lacking in the United States, which threatens to make caring for sick or dying loved ones unsustainable for many families. The ACL recently unveiled a national caregiver support strategy to help meet their needs, but the development and implementation of specific interventions can take years.

The average length of stay for residents of Hildegard House is three and a half weeks and the facility currently has three patient beds. But that number will soon increase. The organization recently received a $100,000 grant to purchase a nearby house that will allow it to accommodate four additional residents.

About 80 comfort care homes are in operation in the United States, according to Cassidy. Nationally, these facilities offer a total of 192 beds and serve about 2,550 residents a year, reported the Omega Home Network, an association of comfort care homes.

As the US population continues to age, the availability of comfort care homes will likely prove to be one more area where demand exceeds supply. Increased awareness and financial support for these organizations would go a long way to improving access, Cassidy said.

“We don’t get a lot of publicity. There are not enough providers, and there is even a shortage of palliative care nurses. Some kind of funding for us would be great, some kind of recognition,” Cassidy told Hospice News. “We’re trying to fill a big gap in the continuum.”

In addition to connecting hospices to underserved patients, comfort care homes can, to some extent, help attract more workers to the palliative care space or improve other clinicians’ understanding of the benefits.

A 2018 study published in the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care examined the results of a pilot program in which 18 university students from various clinical disciplines volunteered to care for the dying in a comfort care home.

The researchers concluded that the experience gave the students a greater degree of exposure to end-of-life care than they otherwise would have received.

“Community-run residential homes for the dying provide a unique opportunity for professional training in end-of-life care,” the researchers said. “The opportunity to serve as a caregiver for the dying has enhanced students’ confidence and ability to provide patient and family-centered, empathetic end-of-life care to hospitalized patients in their final days.

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CARROLL, Marguerite https://jasonpowers.org/carroll-marguerite/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:12:05 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/carroll-marguerite/ CARROLL, Marguerite Regina Margaret Regina Carroll, BS, MA, MT (ASCP), originally from Xenia, Ohio, died Thursday, November 10, 2022 at her home. She was the daughter of Charles A. and Emma (Loose) Carrell. She was a graduate of the former St. Brigid Parish Secondary School in Xenia (class of 1942). She received a Bachelor of […]]]>

CARROLL,

Marguerite Regina

Margaret Regina Carroll, BS, MA, MT (ASCP), originally from Xenia, Ohio, died Thursday, November 10, 2022 at her home. She was the daughter of Charles A. and Emma (Loose) Carrell. She was a graduate of the former St. Brigid Parish Secondary School in Xenia (class of 1942). She received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Dayton (1945) and a Master of Arts from Central Michigan University (1984) with a major in Management and Supervision: Health Care Administration. In 1978, she was certified as a clinical laboratory scientist by the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel.

During her professional career at Miami Valley Hospital, she served as an educational supervisor, education coordinator, and education program director for the medical technology and cytotechnology programs in the hospital’s diagnostic laboratories. Since the hospital offered the final year to university students enrolled in medical technology programs, Margaret was appointed clinical assistant professor of medical technology at the University of Dayton and adjunct assistant professor of medical technology at Wright State University. .

After her official retirement, she was awarded the Golden Service Award in 1999 by the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science in recognition of her longstanding support of society and the profession at the highest level.

She was a member and secretary of the St. Brigid Parish Building Committee (1993-96), board member of Toward Independence (1990-99), life member of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Dayton , where she previously served on the curriculum committee and volunteered as a liaison or moderator for eleven seminars (1999-2012). She was currently a member of the executive committee and past president of the Golden Flyers Alumni Association at the University of Dayton. While at St. Brigid’s Church, Margaret proposed, then organized and implemented, with the help of an energetic committee, the only known modern “renewal of marriage vows” ceremony at St. Brigid. The church ceremony was followed by a free festive banquet for 50 married couples in the church school dining hall (2009). Margaret was also instrumental in St. Patrick’s Day celebrations at the church’s parish activity center, as well as St. Brigid’s parish coordinator for blood drives with the Community Blood Center of Dayton for 18 year. On December 29, 2014, she coordinated her 54th and final blood drive at the parish.

She is survived by her brother, Dr. Charles R. Carroll, a special faith group of inspiring and supportive friends, Jim and Ann Stewart, John and Paula Zaino, Patricia Neville, and David and Rita Ryer, her health care advocates home. ; Claudette Wheeler, Tina Knisley, Krystal Koverman, Christine Koverman, Brenda DeBord, Jan Bazell, Melissa Melendez and Aleta Willett, as well as hundreds of alumni of Miami Valley Hospital, University of Dayton and Wright State University .

A Christian burial mass will be held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, November 16, at St. Brigid’s Catholic Church, 312 Fairground Rd., Xenia. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. Wednesday, until time of service at the church. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the St. Brigid Memorial Program, 258 Purcell Ave., Xenia, OH, 45385, Greene County Library Foundation, PO Box 520, Xenia, OH 45385, or Xenia Adult Recreation and Services Center, (XARSC), 338 S. Progress Dr., Xenia, OH 45385, in his memory. Condolences may be presented to the family at www.NeeldFuneralHome.com.

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2D and 3D MRIs Provide Reliable Measurements for ACL Surgery Planning : Newsroom https://jasonpowers.org/2d-and-3d-mris-provide-reliable-measurements-for-acl-surgery-planning-newsroom/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:46:06 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/2d-and-3d-mris-provide-reliable-measurements-for-acl-surgery-planning-newsroom/ Jay P. Shah, MD DALLAS – November 09, 2022 – Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably establish measurements of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) “fingerprints” that are critical to graft placement for reconstructive surgery, report researchers from UT Southwestern. Jay P. Shah, MDassistant professor at Department of Orthopedic Surgery at UTSW, and his colleagues used two- […]]]>




Jay P. Shah, MD

DALLAS – November 09, 2022 – Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably establish measurements of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) “fingerprints” that are critical to graft placement for reconstructive surgery, report researchers from UT Southwestern.

Jay P. Shah, MDassistant professor at Department of Orthopedic Surgery at UTSW, and his colleagues used two- and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine these measurements, an approach that had not been explored before. Their study was published in European radiology.

“This study proves that 2D and 3D MRI is reliable in determining the specifics of the ACL impression,” said Dr. Shah.

The ACL is a crucial stabilizing ligament of the knee, and a torn ACL is one of the most common ligament injuries with serious consequences in terms of morbidity, mobility and cost. Among athletes who sustain ACL tears, 37% are unable to return to pre-injury levels.

For younger patients, ACL tears are often repaired with reconstructive surgery. For successful reconstruction, tunnels must be created in the tibia and femur. The ACL impression is used to determine where these tunnels should be drilled for graft placement.

A magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the knee illustrates how the location of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) baseplate is determined, with measurements relative to nearby anatomical landmarks.

The anatomical placement of ACL grafts impacts postoperative stability and potentially the future risk of arthritis for patients. Improper placement of the tibial tunnels can lead to reduced rotational stability of the knee. Accurate measurements of ACL impressions will allow surgeons to reliably predict anatomy and plan surgery.

To determine where to make the tunnels, surgeons typically use arthroscopy, in which a camera connected to a tube is inserted through a small incision to view the joint. However, the locations of ACL indentations are not always clear under arthroscopy.

MRI has been used successfully to observe the structure of the ACL. Dr. Shah and a team of researchers reviewed 2D and 3D knee MRIs of 101 adult patients to measure the tibial-ACL and intermeniscal ligament-ACL margins. They then compared the measurements to those obtained under arthroscopy.

“We found that the mean differences between 2D and 3D measurements of the tibia-ACL and intermeniscal ligament-ACL are small, and 2D and 3D MRI can be reliably used to delineate foot plate anatomy. of the ACL,” said Dr Shah.

Establishing ACL impression measurements using MRI can help reduce surgery times, reduce recovery times and improve patient outcomes, Dr. Shah added. Future studies will evaluate the results of ACL reconstruction based on different impression measurements.

Other UTSW researchers involved in this study were Toan Nguyen, Shamrez Haider, David Tietze, Yin Xi, Uma Thakur and Avneesh Chhabra.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty has received six Nobel Prizes and includes 24 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine, and 14 researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Full-time faculty of more than 2,900 are responsible for groundbreaking medical advances and committed to rapidly translating scientific research into new clinical treatments. UT Southwestern physicians provide care in more than 80 specialties to more than 100,000 inpatients, more than 360,000 emergency room cases, and oversee nearly 4 million outpatient visits annually.



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Las Cruces Heart Institute specializes in all aspects of cardiology, electrophysiology https://jasonpowers.org/las-cruces-heart-institute-specializes-in-all-aspects-of-cardiology-electrophysiology/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 21:53:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/las-cruces-heart-institute-specializes-in-all-aspects-of-cardiology-electrophysiology/ By Mike Cook Dr. Lookman Lawal is the founder and chief medical officer of ASC at The Heart Institute, 1250 N. Sonoma Ranch Blvd. Lawal is board certified in cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology, which is the branch of cardiology that deals with the treatment of heart rhythm disorders. The Heart Institute is the only facility […]]]>

By Mike Cook

Dr. Lookman Lawal is the founder and chief medical officer of ASC at The Heart Institute, 1250 N. Sonoma Ranch Blvd. Lawal is board certified in cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology, which is the branch of cardiology that deals with the treatment of heart rhythm disorders.

The Heart Institute is the only facility in Las Cruces that specializes in electrophysiology, said the institute’s director of nursing, Jared Felton. It is also the only one to offer cardiac ablation, a minimally invasive procedure used to treat heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias).

“No other cardiologist can do that in Las Cruces,” Felton said.

Lawal provides preventive care and all other aspects of cardiac care to his patients, he said.

“His expertise includes evaluating patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), syncope (fainting), and tilt table testing,” Felton said. He also performs procedures such as stress test, echocardiogram, Holter monitor, cardiac arrhythmia ablation, implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators. He is one of the few doctors to specialize in the Watchman implant for the prevention of strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation.

The individual counseling Lawal provides helps patients cope with high blood pressure, obesity, smoking and other issues that can stress the heart, Felton said. An electrocardiogram (ECG), which records the heart’s electrical signal, is often a good start, Felton said, along with a stress test and a discussion of a person’s lifestyle choices and any history of heart disease in his family.

If a person has breathing problems, low energy, or “just not feeling well,” this might be a good time for a conversation with their family doctor, who can then make a referral to Lawal to pursue this. discussion and recommend healthy lifestyle changes or medical procedures, if needed.

In many cases, Felton said, a person’s insurance may not require a referral from a family doctor, so they can come directly to Lawal.

“It’s not an assembly line. These are people’s lives,” said Felton, an Alamogordo native who has been a nurse for 13 years and arrived at the Heart Institute a year and a half ago. He holds a degree in nursing from New Mexico State University and previously worked at Memorial Medical Center.

Lawal completed his internship and residency at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, followed by postgraduate training in cardiovascular disease at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio. He then completed a fellowship in clinical cardiac electrophysiology at the Southwestern School of Medicine at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he spent an additional year in advanced training in electrophysiology, focusing on complex ablation therapies for arrhythmias. Lawal’s medical degree is obtained from the University of Ibadan College of Medicine in Ibadan, Nigeria.

He is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in El Paso and Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine in Las Cruces, where he is actively involved in teaching.

The Heart Institute CSA is open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Call 575-323-3010. Visit https://ascheart.com.

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What is brown noise and will it help you sleep better? https://jasonpowers.org/what-is-brown-noise-and-will-it-help-you-sleep-better/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:20:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/what-is-brown-noise-and-will-it-help-you-sleep-better/ The big question is whether or not brown noise helps with sleep. While many people have claimed and even benefited from brown noise for sleep, there really isn’t much research to show a link between better sleep and brown noise. Professor of Neurology and Director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center Alon Avidan MD, MPH […]]]>

The big question is whether or not brown noise helps with sleep. While many people have claimed and even benefited from brown noise for sleep, there really isn’t much research to show a link between better sleep and brown noise. Professor of Neurology and Director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center Alon Avidan MD, MPH tells Form that broadband noises have not proven effective. “If patients ask me if they should buy a machine that cancels ambient noise or plays noise, I tell them not to,” he explains. “The data so far does not show it has scientific merit.”

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYU Langone Health Thea Gallagher Psy.D. explains to Shape that brown noise can help slow the mind for better concentration: “There’s no high-level scientific research on this, but [listening to brown noise] seems to be a way to slow down the brain.”

On the other hand, Sarah Silverman, specialist in behavioral sleep medicine, explains to Outside that she found that the best sound for sleep aid would be pink noise, followed by brown noise, then white noise. Brown noise, however, has been proven to aid concentration and relaxation with its deeper tones. Often people use brown noise when working to drown out distracting outside sounds. Silverman reveals to Outside that it’s not ideal for falling asleep as it aims to put you in a focused state of mind.

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Collaborative Approach to Pediatric Keratoconus Delivers Positive Patient Outcomes https://jasonpowers.org/collaborative-approach-to-pediatric-keratoconus-delivers-positive-patient-outcomes/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 23:07:14 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/collaborative-approach-to-pediatric-keratoconus-delivers-positive-patient-outcomes/ Christina Twardowski, OD, FAAO, and Erin D. Stahl, MD, share highlights from their discussion, “A Collaborative Approach to Pediatric Keratoconus,” which they presented at the 2022 meeting of the American Academy of Optometry . The 2022 meeting of the American Academy of Optometry takes place this year in San Diego. Drs. Christina Twardowski and Erin […]]]>

Christina Twardowski, OD, FAAO, and Erin D. Stahl, MD, share highlights from their discussion, “A Collaborative Approach to Pediatric Keratoconus,” which they presented at the 2022 meeting of the American Academy of Optometry .

The 2022 meeting of the American Academy of Optometry takes place this year in San Diego. Drs. Christina Twardowski and Erin Stahl share with optometry time® key highlights from their discussion, “A Collaborative Approach to Pediatric Keratoconus,” which they presented at the meeting.

Christina Twardowski, OD, FAAO, is program director for the Children’s Mercy Pediatric Optometry Residency Program, as well as clinical assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, and Erin D. Stahl, MD, a pediatric ophthalmologist who is division director of ophthalmology and associate chair of surgery at Children’s Mercy Kansas City, as well as a professor in the department of ophthalmology at the University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Medicine.

What are the main lessons of the presentation?

  1. There is no bad reference – Often doctors think they have to keep a patient until a diagnosis can be confirmed. Pediatric keratoconus can progress rapidly, which means waiting for certainty of diagnosis can lead to permanent vision loss. Any suspicion of keratoconus warrants a referral.
  2. Use your retinoscope – Doctors often try secondary tests to help confirm the diagnosis of keratoconus. When it comes to children, testing attempts are often unsuccessful due to patient cooperation. Retinoscopy is a tool that we all have and that can confirm the diagnosis of keratoconus in any elderly patient.
  3. Optical treatment AND medical treatment are necessary – Being able to provide your pediatric keratoconus patients with both treatments is imperative for successful vision and eye health outcomes. Collaboration between optometry and ophthalmology is essential to meet family expectations and ensure the success of long-term vision.

Why is this so important for optometrists to address?

Optometrists tend to be the first to see and diagnose patients with keratoconus. Pediatric keratoconus may not be a diagnosis that comes to your office every week, but understanding the severity of the condition and the treatment required for these patients will help guide your decisions going forward.

What does this mean for patient care?

Early detection and treatment are key to avoiding severe visual impairment. Corneal cross-linking offers a true treatment for keratoconus, halting corneal changes and avoiding the full range of visual rehabilitation options. Pediatric patients with keratoconus require early diagnosis, careful examination, and early intervention with CXL to ensure a positive visual prognosis.

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Alleghany Schools Partners with Mountain Gateway in Pilot Medical Program; After . . . https://jasonpowers.org/alleghany-schools-partners-with-mountain-gateway-in-pilot-medical-program-after/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 06:05:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/alleghany-schools-partners-with-mountain-gateway-in-pilot-medical-program-after/ Here’s a roundup of education briefs. Want more education news? There is no full-time reporter west of Richmond covering K-college education. You can help solve this problem. Help fund this post. * * * Alleghany Schools Partners with Mountain Gateway Alleghany Highlands Public Schools and other school divisions are partnering with Mountain Gateway Community College […]]]>

Here’s a roundup of education briefs. Want more education news? There is no full-time reporter west of Richmond covering K-college education. You can help solve this problem. Help fund this post.

* * *

Alleghany Schools Partners with Mountain Gateway

Alleghany Highlands Public Schools and other school divisions are partnering with Mountain Gateway Community College for a pilot program at Mountain Gateway that provides high school students with comprehensive training for careers in clinical medical assistant and nursing. certified practical nurse. It also provides training for students to access more than 100 different areas of health care.

Alleghany Highlands Public Schools worked with Mountain Gateway Community College and other school divisions to help develop Advanced Health Care Professional as a vocational and technical training program.

This fall, which marks the first year of the program, Advanced Health Care has three AHPS students. Tiffany Rosales, coordinator of health care programs at Mountain Gateway Community College, intends to expand enrollment by spreading the word to schools in the Mountain Gateway Community College catchment area, which includes Bath County, Alleghany County, Rockbridge County and the northern part of Botetourt County. .

Funding for Advanced Healthcare is provided by FastForward, a Mountain Gateway grant program designed to help students obtain the necessary training they need for their chosen career field.

The Advanced Healthcare Program is part of Alleghany Highlands Healthcare Advancement, an initiative funded by a $497,756 Innovation Grant for High School Vocational and Technical Education from the Virginia Department of Education.

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Memories of the community | News | thevalleyadvantage.com https://jasonpowers.org/memories-of-the-community-news-thevalleyadvantage-com/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://jasonpowers.org/memories-of-the-community-news-thevalleyadvantage-com/ Lions plan cleanup The Eynon Archbald Lions Club will collect litter along its Adopt-A-Highway route on October 22. Club members are asked to gather at the Archbald Borough building to pick up needed supplies at 8:45 a.m. Any interested residents can participate. The Archbald Community Ambulance will provide a safe escort. Church with clothing and […]]]>

Lions plan cleanup

The Eynon Archbald Lions Club will collect litter along its Adopt-A-Highway route on October 22.

Club members are asked to gather at the Archbald Borough building to pick up needed supplies at 8:45 a.m. Any interested residents can participate.

The Archbald Community Ambulance will provide a safe escort.

Church with clothing and food drive






Ss. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church of Olyphant donated Halloween items from their recent thrift sale to the United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania. From left to right, Sunita Manickchand and Jessica Wallo, Director of Community Services and Lauren Telep, President of the Braderie.




Ss. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church of Olyphant will hold a clothing drive through October 23.

Clothing and accessories for men, women, children and babies for all seasons will be accepted and delivered to United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania in Scranton.

The church has already donated a number of Halloween items from their fall thrift sale to UNC. Items can be dropped off at St. Cyril’s School Gymnasium, 133 River Street, Olyphant. Use the side door or go behind the presbytery from 3pm to 5.30pm on Saturday and from 10am to 12.30pm on Sunday. Clothes, which should be clean and wearable, can be left on hangers, in bags or in boxes.

The church is also holding a non-perishable food drive at the same time; items can be dropped off at the same location and at the same times as the clothing collection. Pastor Nestor Iwasiw suggested the food would be delivered to the church’s neighbor, Rescue and Restore Church on Willow Street, which organizes food distributions on the first Monday of every month.

The Carbondale area crowns the queen







Left to right, 2022 Carbondale Area Homecoming Court features Shauna Durst, Robert Constantine, Brycen Kelly, Audrey Cobb, Julia Gorel, Cameron Kilmer, Sophie Crozier, Oscar Martinez, Alyssa Hendrick and Liam Shenise.

Left to right, 2022 Carbondale Area Homecoming Court features Shauna Durst, Robert Constantine, Brycen Kelly, Audrey Cobb, Julia Gorel, Cameron Kilmer, Sophie Crozier, Oscar Martinez, Alyssa Hendrick and Liam Shenise.




On September 23, Carbondale Area held their annual comeback match.

After the alumni parade, the Chargers took the field against Western Wayne. At halftime, the short 2022 was recognized. They include Shauna Durst, Robert Constantine, Brycen Kelly, Audrey Cobb, Julia Gorel, Cameron Kilmer, Sophie Crozier, Oscar Martinez, Alyssa Hendrick, and Liam Shenise.

Julia Gorel has been crowned Homecoming Queen.

“I was completely in shock and I was humiliated,” she said. “It was unexpected to receive this crown. This moment felt quite surreal. I attribute most of the support I have been given to my mother and my aunt who stayed up all night to help me making this dress. My brother as well as my neighbor, Nate, were also very encouraging. I felt like the underdog the whole time and was in tears when they announced my name.

Students gain experience at the Wright CenterThe Wright Center for Community Health recently welcomed eight master’s-level students who will gain knowledge and experience in its primary care practices by completing a program to become physician assistants.

The students are among the first class to enroll in the Central Coast Physician Assistant program, a new initiative of AT Still University of Health Sciences in partnership with the National Association of Community Health Centers and select health centers across the country.

Participants in the 24-month program attend ATSU’s Santa Maria campus in California for one year during their preclinical phase. Then they enter a clinical phase, which includes 35 weeks of supervised clinical practice experiences at the Wright Center or another partner community health center.

“The Wright Centers for Community Health and Higher Medical Education is deeply immersed and passionately engaged in developing and inspiring our current and future interprofessional health workforce,” said Dr. Linda Thomas-Hemak, President and Chief from the leadership of the Wright Centers for Community Health. and higher medical education. “We are excited to embrace an expanded role in preparing physician assistants to work in community teaching health centers, where they will serve and care for historically underserved populations.

“Our partnership with ATSU’s College for Healthy Communities will force us to multiply the achievement of our shared mission to improve America’s health and well-being,” she added. “Future graduates of the program will be essential to the continued renewal of the workforce of community safety net providers such as the Wright Center for Community Health, which depend on dedicated teams of caring, patient- and community-centered healers. community.”

Physician Assistants Bryan Boyle and Angelo Brutico, who are each an alumnus of Marywood University and an employee of the Wright Center, will provide on-site program oversight and direction as Regional Directors of Physician Assistant Education. of the ATSU.

The Central Coast Physician Assistant program prepares its graduates to be “highly competent professionals in the science of medicine” who are “steeped in the osteopathic tradition of caring for body, mind, and spirit for the whole person.”

The Wright Center and ATSU have a long history of successfully collaborating to conceptualize and initiate programs that develop compassionate and skilled physicians and other healthcare professionals to help address workforce shortages in communities. rural and other underserved areas of the country.

Representatives from the AT Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, based in Mesa, participated in the planning stages of the national family medicine residency at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education – a unique program that places medical residents at one of four partner training sites in the United States

In 2020, under a separate program, the Wright Center for Community Health became a rotating home site for aspiring physicians enrolled at ATSU-SOMA – which bills itself as “the medical school from the future”. The school’s unique medical education model allows students to spend their freshman year at the Mesa, Arizona campus, followed by three years at a community health center, where the focus is on fostering caring physicians. of the community who will defend equitable access to health care. . About 30 ATSU-SOMA medical school students are based in primary care practices at the Wright Center in northeastern Pennsylvania.

These programs, combined with the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education’s existing residency and fellowship programs, have positioned the Wright Center’s nonprofit as a true regional provider of interprofessional healthcare education.

The first cohort of Physician Assistant students is expected to complete their clinical rotation at the Wright Center in June 2023.

To learn more about Central Coast Physician Assistant program opportunities, visit the ATSU website at atsu.edu. or contact Carla Blakeslee, Internship Coordinator at the Wright Center, by calling 570-591-5116 or emailing blakesleec@thewrightcenter.org.

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